Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rear Brake Drums

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • doofus
    replied
    I have a similar puller made from a ruined disc brake rotor hub. best puller i'v ever used. even worked on cars that have sat abandoned for years in salvage yard. make your own the only hard bit is the center bolt. Luck Doofus

    Leave a comment:


  • karterfred88
    replied
    Chuck Collins used to sell these, don't know if he still does.

    Leave a comment:


  • alpayed
    replied
    All this hitting things with hammers is not the right way.
    There are hub pullers around (or you can make one like I did) like this.
    1 remove the nut.
    2 place the puller over the studs.
    3 put a bit of grease on each stud and wind the nuts on upside down (flat side to the puller) with a washer underneath.
    4 wind the nuts on until they are level with the ends of the studs. The puller should still be loose on the studs
    5 wind the center bolt in until it presses on the axle end.

    Now here is the important step.

    DO NOT TRY TO TIGHTEN THE CENTER BOLT.

    6 tighten the wheel studs 1 at a time working around in a random sequence.

    Because of the pitch of the wheel studs (UNF) the force applied is very large and there are 5 of them.

    I the hub does not pop off walk away and leave it under tension.

    I have had one stubborn one which released over night.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	P1016530.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	51.5 KB
ID:	1705180

    Allan

    Leave a comment:


  • BILT4ME
    replied
    These days, I would say probably have one made from a piece of 1-1/4" hex bar and drill and tap the end for the axle shaft. If you have or know i=of a local machine shop, I will provide you with detailed dimensions of mine. The only thing I do NOT know for sure is the thread count/inch of the axle threads. That can be confirmed directly from your axle or from other information on this site.

    6512K48 on McMaster Carr. I would NOT do hardened steel such as 1018 because then it is as hard as your axle. Keep it "soft" so it takes the damage and not your axle.

    Leave a comment:


  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    Where would one aquire such a "tool"?...

    Leave a comment:


  • BILT4ME
    replied
    I have used this large nut for this purpose for years. It feels like it will destroy something when you do it, but it works! This tool is designed for exactly this. It tightens against the end of the shaft so the threads don't get damaged.

    Screw it on to the end of the axle and tighten it with a large open end wrench.

    Hit the end with an 8 LB sledge hammer like a pimp on a bad ho...... Until it pops loose. Make sure it stays tight between swings so it does not jack your threads. The hub will pop off. You may not SEE it pop, but you will hear the change in tone when you hit it. It will go from a high pitch ring to a more dull thump. I have had it work in as few as three hits, and as many as 25+ hits. You will note the end is mushroomed due to seriously hard hits and inaccurate swings. I have never used a puller to remove my hubs, only this. My father handed down this tool, as it existed before I knew what it was.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151010_090427781.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	67.0 KB
ID:	1705169Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151010_090448145.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	56.9 KB
ID:	1705170Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151010_090506871.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	64.8 KB
ID:	1705171Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151010_090514607.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	53.5 KB
ID:	1705172Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151010_090528787.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	66.4 KB
ID:	1705173Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20151010_090539414.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	61.9 KB
ID:	1705174

    Leave a comment:


  • austrian
    replied
    Thanks Robert and Fred!! I will report on my progress ....

    Leave a comment:


  • karterfred88
    replied
    The longer they've been on the longer it seems to take to get them off. I borrowed a home made one from a vender with five lug attachment--it worked the best, Since then I have used one in a kit from Autozone that uses 3 legs and pulls on 3 lugs only-works but not as well. The worst thing about this is the amount of force you need to apply, your fear of smashing the puller with a sledge is the hardest part. Sometimes you smash turn and smash and nothing lets go, till you go get a cup of coffee and come back to find it popped while you were gone!!!
    While they are off, I would go to the trouble of removing the swages holding the drums to the hub, removing the drum from the hub, and replacing the lug bolts with ones with a slightly longer shoulder that will engage and center the drum without swaging them. Then after reinstalling the hubs properly you will be able to do any brake work in the future without pulling them again.
    Last edited by karterfred88; 05-04-2016, 06:30 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • rkapteyn
    replied
    What they referring to is , when you tighten the hub puller as far as you can and you hit the end of the puller screw with a big hammer you more than likely shock the hub loose.
    Make sure that you have the axle nut (without the washer) threaded part way on the axle shaft to prevent the drum from flying off and hitting you.
    Apply some heat if it still does not come off.
    Assemble the hub back on the shaft afterwards without grease , anti seize or any lubricant .
    Assemble it dry otherwise , when you tighten the axle nut , it will keep going further on the shaft
    and the taper will split the hub and you may not know the American term "you are up **** creek"
    That means you are in trouble because so many Studebaker "experts" made this mistake that hubs are hard to find.
    Gruss von Joliet

    Robert Kapteyn

    Read this article

    http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/.../reardrum.html

    Explore this website and you will find many tips on Studebakers
    Last edited by rkapteyn; 05-04-2016, 06:24 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • austrian
    replied
    Even with a perfectly fitting puller I did not manage to get my rear drums off thus far!

    I found a how-to online with pictures but I did not quite understand how they finally did it (put some metal between puller and axle and hammerd like hell .....?).

    I am just about to get the whole thing to the shop but I doubt they can manage this easily without destroying anything ......

    Leave a comment:


  • austrian
    replied
    I have the same problem right now - just ordered a puller some 30min ago.

    Pics in manual are really poor!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • 55 56 PREZ 4D
    replied
    Originally posted by Warren Webb View Post
    You obviously have a computer so get all you need in the form of a cd. It's much cheaper & you can print out the page(s) you need without getting a book all greasy & messed up. Available at most of our vendors.
    Does anyone know if the cds are copies of original manuals or from reprints ?
    Asking because the reprint pictures are not as clear as from the originals.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Use a hub puller, not a drum puller.

    Leave a comment:


  • Warren Webb
    replied
    You obviously have a computer so get all you need in the form of a cd. It's much cheaper & you can print out the page(s) you need without getting a book all greasy & messed up. Available at most of our vendors.

    Leave a comment:


  • r1lark
    replied
    Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
    Do the rear brake drums on my Sky Hawk come off the rear hub, or does the whole hub have to come off?
    DeSoto, you apparently don't have a Shop Manual yet. These are invaluable if you are planning on keeping your Studebaker. Go ahead and pop for the parts manuals also when you order the Shop Manual.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X