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  • Engine: Bolt On Crankshaft Socket

    I'm going to try to break my engine loose, using a bolt on crankshaft socket...for want of a better term. It bolts on where the crankshaft pulley is/was, and has a 1/2 or 3/4 inch square hole in it to put a breaker bar into. Any ideas where to get such an animal...if one exists? Every time I hit the remote start, the tip of the fan moves forward about a 1/16 of an inch or so, then moves back to where it was. I squeezed underneath, but can't find anywhere to pry on the flywheel. If I can round up enough beef to push it, I was thinking about pushing it down the drive way and popping the clutch. Good idea, bad idea? And yes, the cylinders are full of acetone/automatic transmission fluid...

  • #2
    I don't think what you seek exists, and it's not a good idea to try turn the engine by way of the crankshaft bolt, anyway. Two suggestions. One, remove the starter, and use a long screwdriver or pry bar to move the flywheel back and forth by prying on the ring gear teeth. You might break a tooth off the ring gear, but in that case the engine is likely stuck so bad it will have to come out, anyway. Two, remove the water pump (for ease of access) and the crankshaft pulley. Get a long piece of steel bar or angle stock, and drill a pair of holes near one end to match up with the pulley bolts. Bolt that on, and use it to rock the engine back and forth.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      I've seen what you are asking about for Chevys and Fords, but not Studebakers. What Gord mentions is a good idea, or you could make a round plate that will bolt onto the front crank hub bolts, and weld a big nut onto it in the center -- this will do essentially what the tool you are describing does.
      Paul
      Winston-Salem, NC
      Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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      • #4
        Went out and checked the crank pulley. First off, the pulley has studs, not bolts holding it on the balancer. Second the crank bolt is an inch and a half, so I can't get the pulley off the balancer. Back to square one...

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        • #5
          Aren't there two threaded holes in the pulley/hub, so you can use a puller (once you get the crank bolt out)? I use a steering wheel puller, just have to put a few washers over the bolt hole in the end of the crank.

          As far as the pulley bolt, check with local parts stores, they usually have large sockets. Or, Lowes home Improvement's Kolbalt line may have large sockets available individually.

          There is a 'lock plate' for the crank bolt that has one edge folded over onto one of the crankshaft bolt flats. Be sure to flatten that back out before you try to take the bolt out. I usually use an air impact to zip the bolt out.
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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          • #6
            I have an engine that has been stuck for years. I've had it soaking in oil for years. I have tried many times to use "Reasonable" force to move it. I understand that "reasonable" is a very subjective term. However, just in case there is something seriously wrong, internally, that would never allow the engine to turn, I am reluctant to try more extreme measures to get it to turn. Who know whether or not there is a broken rod, rod cap, or seized up valve train ready to break something. It is possible to make a repairable engine pure junk by forcing it until something breaks.

            On my engine, since I don't need it at this time, I'm willing to wait until I can remove the oil pan, and valve covers. If that does not reveal the problem, I'll probably even remove the heads and expose the pistons before attempting to move it by excessive force.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

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            • #7
              The thing that gets me is that it will move then return to its original position...

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              • #8
                Are the Spark Plugs out?
                It is way better to use Acetone and ATF 50%/50% and soak the Rings, instead of breaking them and scoring the Cylinder walls or bending the Pushrods trying to turn a stuck Engine.

                The Valves are most likely rusted to the Cast Iron Valve Guides.

                You will need to bend the lock Tab on the Crank Bolt and buy a 1 1/2" X 3/4 Drive Socket and a 3/4 to 1/2 Adapter to later turn the Engine with a 1/2 inch Drive Torque Wrench or Breaker Bar.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                • #9
                  Plugs are out, 50/50 acetone ATF in all the cylinders. Valves stuck is a possibility...I'll give them a tap with the rubber hammer...
                  Last edited by 345 DeSoto; 04-16-2016, 03:15 AM.

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                  • #10
                    A brass drift and hammer on the rocker arm tip will bump valves open just a tad. most hardware stores carry a deep well 1 1/2 6 point 1/2 drive socket, it's for water heater elemonts and works great on crank bolts after lock plate is flattened. Luck, Doofus

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                    • #11
                      You don't state if it's a standard or auto. If it's a stick, try to pry from one of the holes in the clutch cover. Also put lots of penetrant on all the valve train in case something there is frozen. If not follow doofus's suggestion.
                      Good luck.
                      Bill

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                      • #12
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OC-Ot4jcSI
                        Redneck Restorations
                        6 part series on turning over an engine with unknown history.
                        A Pontiac but the procedure is the same.
                        You may not have to go through all the steps he shows, but there they are.
                        Caution: If you are someone who has to have surgical cleanliness during automotive work:
                        DO NOT WATCH THIS !
                        This IS Redneck Restorations after all.
                        South Lompoc Studebaker

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                        • #13
                          Unless you are planning to flip the car, at a minimum, I'd remove, disassemble and clean up the heads; then while the heads are off, try to free up the motor. I've had to bust pistons up in order to get them out. With stuck pistons, look for pits in the cylinder walls. Any cylinders with pits too deep to remove with oversize boring, will need to be sleeved.

                          Even if you do free up the motor, you could do major damage by running it even a minute or two. That happened to me once with a 352 motor in a 56J, and it wasn't even stuck.

                          Figure about $3000 for a rebuild, if you do the work, other than machining and hot tank.

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                          • #14
                            try pulling the rockers and make sure the valves are all CLOSED.... ATF and ACETONE in the cylinders as well..

                            then try bumping it again. it just might be a stuck valve you're dealing with and if it's stuck you could end up with a hole in a piston if it hits.l

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                            • #15
                              See post # 13 !!! It is unlikely you will end up with an engine that provides any real service.....that is unless you're just putting together a "driver".....

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