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  • Okiejoe86
    replied
    You can always weld a bolt to the top and use a socket to get it out. I have done that on broken exhaust bolts

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  • gpete
    replied
    I have for years used a variation of the acetylene torch approach. Heat them red hot and walk away until they are stone cold. Then go back and usually they will be loose. May have to libricate after the initial turn or two. GP

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  • CJMiller
    replied
    I've been fighting the door hinge screws on my Lark for two weeks, and I'm ready to take a torch to the last three, but I'm wondering why I shouldn't replace them with bolts?

    They don't show once the door panel is on, and even if I never have a moment's trouble with them, the next owner who has to do a door adjustment 20 years from now will surely thank me, right?

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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    Dipping the screw/bolt head with a candle or similar wax after heating has worked for me in some really tough situations.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Some good methods have been mentioned and will remove the screws most of the time. One more method as a last resort is to try the same thing used on broken head studs on Model A engines. Lay a good sized thick flat washer over the screw head (or broken head stud) and weld it to the screw head. Let it cool, then lay a large nut over the flat washer and weld the center of the nut to the flat washer. Let it cool and unscrew the welded mess. Almost always the two heat cycles will have broken the rust bond and the screw will come out. If the nut breaks off, then reweld it and try it again. I've never had one fail to be removed by the first or second try.

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  • rkapteyn
    replied
    The door screws on the Studebaker are not Phillips screws.
    As others in this post noted.
    They are pozidrive
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...rives#Pozidriv.
    Use an impact drive with the pozidrive bit.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_driver
    http://www.justbrits.com/pozi/pozidriv.html

    Robert Kapteyn
    Last edited by rkapteyn; 04-04-2016, 05:25 AM.

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  • candbstudebakers
    replied
    Go to Sears and get a couple of #3 phillips bits that fit the 3/8 ratchet if you have an inpack tool that is for a 3/8 us it if the tool is 1/2 " then use an adapter 1/2 to 3/8, the #3 has a blunt end and fits these screws perfect, some of the screws will back out easy, some will sheer the head off and then you can drill out the screw and some times the bit will break and that is why you buy a couple from sears when they break you take them back and get new ones for free. Also remember the the door is heavy and will want to drop when screws are removed, after you get a screw out of each hinge get a couple of bolts with the same thread and cut the head off and install into one of the holes that the screwed out , once all are removed you can slide the door off the bolts and you can use the bolts when installing the door just screw one into each hinge and slide the door on they will hold the door in place, good luck.

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  • FleetMaster68
    replied
    Google " Shaker breaker " its an air hammer/chisel insert with a posi driver bit and lever arm to rotate the screw while using light impact force to break the bond between threads and rust. On my buy list. Couple people I know swear these work well. Amazon and fleabay several sellers. Once they are out, I run new fasteners with oil in and out couple times. Final fasteners have either antiseize or heavy grease. If I or the future owners ever need to remove, it will save a lot of swearing.

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  • bezhawk
    replied
    You may get lucky using phillips head drivers, but for the proper fit you need posi-drive bits. there is less chance of slippage when whacking the impact driver.

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    I think most of us have confronted this problem. Heat works, soaking for days at a time sometimes works, drilling out always works as a last resort ---- but don't be a hurry or you'll bugger things up. Go slow, have patience, take a break, go have a beer and try again tomorrow.

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  • 63 R2 Hawk
    replied
    I tried all of the above, ended up using a reverse twist cobalt drill slightly smaller than the screw diameter. Several of them unscrewed when the reverse twist drill bit into the screw and backed it out. I replaced all the hidden (inside the door panel) screws about 10 years ago with stainless socket head cap screws with anti-seize compound on them. I had to remove my driver door recently and it was easy this time

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  • 57pack
    replied
    Originally posted by thunderations View Post
    If you have access to an oxy/acetylene torch, heat the screws to red hot without melting the head. While it is red hot use the screwdriver that fits the head the best and turn it out. I know it sounds wrong, but until I saw it done and then did it myself several times, I didn't believe it would happen either.
    I was removing those screws on a Wagonaire only yesterday. I used my map gas torch and a large screwdriver with vise grips locked on shaft. Getting the screws red hot and inserting screwdriver, giving the screwdriver some whacks, they came out, some easy, some under protest.

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  • thunderations
    replied
    If you have access to an oxy/acetylene torch, heat the screws to red hot without melting the head. While it is red hot use the screwdriver that fits the head the best and turn it out. I know it sounds wrong, but until I saw it done and then did it myself several times, I didn't believe it would happen either.

    Leave a comment:


  • 5brown1
    replied
    To get the hinge screws out of the speedster I drilled a hole through the screw and enlarged it with larger bits until the hole was large enough to insert a hacksaw blade which I had ground down. I ground the back side of the blade off until the end had an area about 1.5 inches long which was about 3/16 in width and would fit in the hole in the screw.
    I then used it to cut through the screw. It left a cut in the female threads but made it pretty easy to remove the rest of the screw. I only had to make one cut per screw but it might be necessary to make more.

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  • Mo-Baker
    replied
    Hey Peanut, As you were writing that I was doing that. No go! this is really getting frustrating.

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