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Plastic floats on new sending units

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  • Treblig
    replied
    Originally posted by rbigcal View Post
    I ordered a Moeller unit to use in my 64 wagonaire, haven't received it yet. To make it work should it be modified to match bends and length of the old original one or just modified to get the right range of motion to match depth of tank?
    No need to have the same bends as the original, the sender won't care how the wire is shaped. Normally you simply cut the wire to a length that give you the up and down travel (full to empty) to fit the height of your tank. You just have to make sure that the float is within an inch or so from the bottom and registers full when the tank is full (or when the float is raised as high as it will go in the tank). If you measure the depth of your tank it makes it pretty easy and that's the distance the float should travel. But in the end you want to know when you're getting low on gas .

    PS - When I installed my Moeller a couple of weeks ago I couldn't get it to work correctly with the dash gauge (59 Silver Hawk) even though the dash gauge functioned properly when tested. I had to send the gauge and the sender off to be calibrated. It should be back in a few weeks.

    Treblig

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  • rbigcal
    replied
    I ordered a Moeller unit to use in my 64 wagonaire, haven't received it yet. To make it work should it be modified to match bends and length of the old original one or just modified to get the right range of motion to match depth of tank?

    Leave a comment:


  • joncon
    replied
    I repaired mine today in my 63 Cruiser. I had a foam carb float, not sure what carb it came from. I removed the cork, pushed the wire through the foam float and replaced the small washer on the end. Seems to be working OK.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treblig
    replied
    Originally posted by Flat Ernie View Post
    I agree with you. I simply thought it was a good article from the stand point it told you how to check the meter range and adjust the stops to get the readings you need.

    Bending the arm is irrelevant - so long as you have full range of motion and full is near the top and empty is near the bottom, it doesn't matter what shape the arm is...it's the arc is scribes within the tank that matters and where the float is at the top and bottom.
    Yes Flat Ernie, the web site that you posted has some very good info!!

    treblig

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  • thunderations
    replied
    If, for some reason you can't get the exact readings, EMPTY is the most important thing to know. I can live with a gauge that only reads 3/4 when it's full or stays full for 100 miles before it starts to drop. If it doesn't tell you when it's empty, make sure you have a gas can and some comfortable walking shoes.
    Originally posted by Flat Ernie View Post
    I agree with you. I simply thought it was a good article from the stand point it told you how to check the meter range and adjust the stops to get the readings you need.

    Bending the arm is irrelevant - so long as you have full range of motion and full is near the top and empty is near the bottom, it doesn't matter what shape the arm is...it's the arc is scribes within the tank that matters and where the float is at the top and bottom.

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  • Flat Ernie
    replied
    Originally posted by thunderations View Post
    I disagree with "never bending the arm". If the float hits the top or bottom of the tank before the rod arm hits the stops, what good was that adjustment?
    I agree with you. I simply thought it was a good article from the stand point it told you how to check the meter range and adjust the stops to get the readings you need.

    Bending the arm is irrelevant - so long as you have full range of motion and full is near the top and empty is near the bottom, it doesn't matter what shape the arm is...it's the arc is scribes within the tank that matters and where the float is at the top and bottom.

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  • Treblig
    replied
    Originally posted by thunderations View Post
    I disagree with "never bending the arm". If the float hits the top or bottom of the tank before the rod arm hits the stops, what good was that adjustment?
    I agree with "thunderations"!! I've installed universal type senders and you just have to make sure to hold (very firmly) the upper portion of the rod so you don't put pressure on the sensitive sender parts. By "very firmly" I mean gripping the upper part of the arm with duck bill pliers or vice grips just so that there's no load (twisting/pulling) on the sending unit itself.

    treblig

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  • thunderations
    replied
    I disagree with "never bending the arm". If the float hits the top or bottom of the tank before the rod arm hits the stops, what good was that adjustment?
    Originally posted by Flat Ernie View Post
    Stumbled upon this good article for adjusting the sending unit...

    http://www.mgexp.com/article/fuel-sender-adjust.html

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  • Flat Ernie
    replied
    Stumbled upon this good article for adjusting the sending unit...

    http://www.mgexp.com/article/fuel-sender-adjust.html

    Leave a comment:


  • thunderations
    replied
    Yes, the tank is grounded by being bolted to the frame.
    Originally posted by Treblig View Post
    I just finished accessing my fuel sending unit (59 Silver Hawk) . I followed the service manual instructions. Removed sending unit wire, turned ign "on" and it registered Empty. Then, with the wire still removed, I grounded the wire directly to battery ground ("ign on") and the gauge went to full. That's exactly what's supposed to happen if the gauge and the wire are good. So I guess I'll order a Moeller Sending unit and swap it out. I did find that the Moeller unit 035725-10 is designed for 240-33 Ohm gauges. According to everyone here it should be the same as the original sending unit (Ohmwise).

    I want to thank everyone who gave info on this subject!!

    Oh, one more thing....I noticed that there was no ground wire on any of the screws, is that normal??

    treblig

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  • Treblig
    replied
    I just finished accessing my fuel sending unit (59 Silver Hawk) . I followed the service manual instructions. Removed sending unit wire, turned ign "on" and it registered Empty. Then, with the wire still removed, I grounded the wire directly to battery ground ("ign on") and the gauge went to full. That's exactly what's supposed to happen if the gauge and the wire are good. So I guess I'll order a Moeller Sending unit and swap it out. I did find that the Moeller unit 035725-10 is designed for 240-33 Ohm gauges. According to everyone here it should be the same as the original sending unit (Ohmwise).

    I want to thank everyone who gave info on this subject!!

    Oh, one more thing....I noticed that there was no ground wire on any of the screws, is that normal??

    treblig

    Leave a comment:


  • Flat Ernie
    replied
    Originally posted by stude dude View Post
    From one of our more technically minded customers -

    Checked fuel sender resistance and gauge (which is N.O.S. - 1962 Lark). Fuel sender is 240-30 ohms (empty-full) which appears standard. I purchased a RESISTANCE WHEEL from Jaycar to check fuel gauge - http://www.jaycar.com.au/Passive-Com...Wheel/p/RR0700

    Results on gauge with resistance wheel connected at joiner between front and rear wiring loom at left front firewall are -
    220 ohms - empty
    150 ohms - 1/4
    100 ohms - 1/2
    56 ohms - way past full.

    It appears fuel sender resistance does not match fuel gauge.
    240-30 ohms is one of the industry standards, and appears to be the standard used by Studebaker in the 60s. NOS doesn't always mean good. If he's reading "way past full" at 56 ohms, there's likely a problem with his gauge.

    However, if Studebaker didn't use the industry standard, this is an easy problem to solve. Using his 'resistance wheel' - also called a potentiometer - He can find what his full resistance is for his gauge and find a stand-alone resistor that matches the value difference between the sending unit and the gauge and then wire it in series with the sending unit.

    For example, if he finds that his gauge reads "full" at 70 ohms, and the sending unit uses 33 ohms, simply wire a resistor of 44 ohms (77-33) in series with the sending unit wire to the gauge. His gauge will read full at full, but may read inaccurately at other levels.

    Another solution may be found in adjusting the arm. This will not allow full travel to the full position, so that the float hits the tank top once it reaches the desired resistance.



    Other industry standards are, from empty to full:

    0-90 ohms (generally used by GM from mid-60s up)
    0-30 ohms (generally used by GM before mid-60s)
    73-10 ohms (generally used by Ford & Chrysler until early '90s)
    240-33 ohms (generic, industry standard for most makes not specifically listed)
    Last edited by Flat Ernie; 04-05-2016, 10:50 AM.

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  • paul shuffleburg
    replied
    I just installed a Moeller in my Champ. It came with gasket and screws. Easy adjustment.

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  • stude dude
    replied
    Originally posted by Flat Ernie View Post
    How have you traced the problem to the sending units?
    From one of our more technically minded customers -

    Checked fuel sender resistance and gauge (which is N.O.S. - 1962 Lark). Fuel sender is 240-30 ohms (empty-full) which appears standard. I purchased a RESISTANCE WHEEL from Jaycar to check fuel gauge - http://www.jaycar.com.au/Passive-Com...Wheel/p/RR0700

    Results on gauge with resistance wheel connected at joiner between front and rear wiring loom at left front firewall are -
    220 ohms - empty
    150 ohms - 1/4
    100 ohms - 1/2
    56 ohms - way past full.

    It appears fuel sender resistance does not match fuel gauge.

    Leave a comment:


  • thunderations
    replied
    To the best of my knowledge, Studebaker used gauges that were calibrated to the "Industry Standard", 33-240 OHMS. I didn't have to do anything to make this unit work in my 63 Daytona, except modify the float rod to correspond to my tank depth. Measure your tank depth, (remove sender and measure from bottom of tank to top). Adjust the float rod with the float installed to work in that amount of space, full up to full down. That should give you full and empty.
    The entire unit gets submerged when the tank is full, just like the original one. The unit can be turned on the mounting flange to get the correct float direction. Mine came with a gasket. I did this over a year ago and it's working perfectly.
    Originally posted by 56GH View Post
    The universal sending units are sold by Moeller Marine Products in Sparta, TN. The gasket and screws are sold separately. Does anyone know how to adjust the unit properly to calibrate it to the resistance range of a '62-'64 GT Hawk gas gage? What are the ohm readings for empty and full on our gages and what should the travel be on the arm of the sending unit? Does the internal plastic housing for the measuring apparatus get submerged with a full tank of gas?

    I think a lot of Studebaker owners have been spending a lot of money for a long time replacing original sending units. If this universal sending unit works, THANK YOU!

    Leave a comment:

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