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232 V-8 Fuel Line (Pump to Carb)

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  • Fuel System: 232 V-8 Fuel Line (Pump to Carb)

    Hello!

    I am new to Studebaker ownership. On the top of the engine, I need to replace the steel fuel line (copper coated) between the fuel pump and the Stromberg WW carburetor.

    Where can I find one of these? I will need one with new compression fittings on each end.

    Thank you,

    Tony Peterson
    '54 Studebaker Commander Land Cruiser

  • #2
    Many of us use the two existing ends and join them with a piece of neoprene fuel line.

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    • #3
      With the proper flaring tool it can be made just like any other hard lines
      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      '33 Rockne 10,
      '51 Commander Starlight,
      '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
      '56 Sky Hawk

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by BOEING707100 View Post
        Hello!

        I am new to Studebaker ownership. On the top of the engine, I need to replace the steel fuel line (copper coated) between the fuel pump and the Stromberg WW carburetor.

        Where can I find one of these? I will need one with new compression fittings on each end.

        Thank you,

        Tony Peterson
        '54 Studebaker Commander Land Cruiser
        Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
        With the proper flaring tool it can be made just like any other hard lines
        Here is a pic of my '51 Land Cruiser 232. It now has just a little over 60,000 miles, and not much has changed since it left the assembly line. I changed the fuel pump several years ago. Otherwise, I believe the fuel pump to carburetor fuel line is the one that came with it.

        Click image for larger version

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        You mentioned compression fittings. There were no compression fittings used. As mentioned by rockne10...it uses "flare" fittings, and with a flare tool, easy to make. The "pig tail" curl in the line serves two purposes. It increases flexibility for aligning and connecting the fittings, and operates as a kind of "shock" absorber against vibration. Some parts stores sell various lengths of this kind of brake/fuel lines with fittings on both ends. You can buy a short one of these of the appropriate size and (with a tube bender) make your own. If you can't get a suitable length, buy one too long, bend your curl, and then you only have to cut and make one flare. Just be sure to put the fitting on before you flare the line. I'm not going to admit why I'm giving you this caution.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow, thanks everybody

          Originally posted by jclary View Post
          Here is a pic of my '51 Land Cruiser 232. It now has just a little over 60,000 miles, and not much has changed since it left the assembly line. I changed the fuel pump several years ago. Otherwise, I believe the fuel pump to carburetor fuel line is the one that came with it.

          [ATTACH=CONFIG]52461[/ATTACH]

          You mentioned compression fittings. There were no compression fittings used. As mentioned by rockne10...it uses "flare" fittings, and with a flare tool, easy to make. The "pig tail" curl in the line serves two purposes. It increases flexibility for aligning and connecting the fittings, and operates as a kind of "shock" absorber against vibration. Some parts stores sell various lengths of this kind of brake/fuel lines with fittings on both ends. You can buy a short one of these of the appropriate size and (with a tube bender) make your own. If you can't get a suitable length, buy one too long, bend your curl, and then you only have to cut and make one flare. Just be sure to put the fitting on before you flare the line. I'm not going to admit why I'm giving you this caution.
          Thanks so much for the advice. I'll pick up flare and bending tools and make my own line.

          Comment


          • #6
            Most FLAPS carry a type of steel line you can actually tie in a knot by hand! last i used was green in color and very easy to work by hand, cant remember brand but ask, try NAPA. Luck Doofus

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