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Which type of intake manifold gaskets are best

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  • jackb
    replied
    I always thought if your old head may have some deformity, the composite made a better compress ? A newly milled head and block should accept the metal gaskets better ??

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    I had a few of the composite intake gaskets blow through at the exhaust crossover port. But that was on 56J. I stopped using composites after that. As for Studes, figured I'd learned my lesson on 56Js, so have avoided them on Studes.

    In looking at composite head gaskets, I see some have, and some do not have the, "fire rings" around the piston holes. I'd stay away from those that don't, due to concern about eventual blow through.

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  • jclary
    replied
    Hey Alan, we're pulling for you. If you have the tech gadgets, take and post pics while you are there. I'm glad to know you are going to trailer. I know we are the Studebaker "Drivers" Club...but in events like these...driving there puts you at an immediate disadvantage. If you do get the car cleaned to "Trailer" condition, the labor involved takes away from time to really relax and enjoy the experience. Good luck!

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  • alanmende
    replied
    Thank you to all who responded. I regasketed our engine some time before 2008 and don't recall what I used. But I'll go with the metal gaskets because the engine is original, and as far as I know was never rebuilt. I don't think AACA judges are going to look at the engine closer than seeing good paint and a lack of dirt and oil.

    The AACA Grand National will be the first time I trailer the car to a show, but only because I will change from radial to bias ply tires. How we ever drove on those I'll never know.

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  • jclary
    replied
    My take on gaskets is (normally) reach for the nearest one. That is, given that everything is "normal," you have recognized quality, and there are no extenuating circumstances. About "quality"...with today's corporate practice of "holding companies," buying, trading, and sometimes trashing the quality reputation of some manufacturers, (in the mean time, taking the money and running.) it is difficult to know who's who. But, for the most part, I don't think any good gasket manufacturer would intentionally invest in employees, machinery, skilled die makers, die cutting machinery, advertising, and all the stuff required to make and market gaskets, to intentionally miss-apply and sell gaskets that will fail.

    What is a gasket, but a seal? Accurately applied, a gasket with sufficient chemical resistance, temperature, and compressability, tolerances should perform its assigned task. Just yesterday, I was rummaging through some of my stash of parts. I encountered a box of head gaskets. Some look to be all metal, some seem to be a combination of metal/asbestos sandwich. I'm not sure when you would choose which, but my uneducated guess is that the sandwich might be more forgiving of a slightly uneven surface.

    One very familiar brand, to us all, is Fel-Pro, I doubt they would want to risk their good reputation by making a bad gasket for, of all things, a Studebaker engine. I have eight engines full of gaskets. Some have been in place without failing for nearly half a century. The most common gasket failure I've had is chemically degraded carburetor, and the out board ends of flathead six exhaust manifold gaskets. The main reason for the exhaust gasket failure is due to neglecting to mechanically address the problem immediately. Once that manifold's bolt looses enough torque to keep the seal, the resulting "hot spot" will damage the gasket, and if neglected too long, will also oxidize and erode the port surface.

    As far as intake gaskets...I've always wondered about how Studebaker attaches their intakes with the clamps that bridge over two ports. How even is the clamping forces? What effect does clamping and unclampling cycles have? Surely, there is some point that the resulting deforming of the clamps can influence the distribution of clamping force. I'm always impressed at drag racers who will rip parts off, make a repair, and be screaming down the track in minutes. Doing, in a very short time, what would take me weeks!

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    If your engine is original, with the original heads... Then the steel intake gaskets will work fine.
    If you have had your deck milled, or your heads milled, then the composite gaskets will probably serve you better.

    I suppose it is possible, an a/r judge 'might' take notice of a composite gasket on a Stude engine and make note of it.. (but I doubt it)

    There have been several suppliers of composite intake gaskets through the years.
    So making a claim that all composite gaskets are bad because of one failure is not very realistic.
    And saying that a composite gasket is cheaper than a steel gasket (I will use the word cheaper as a monetary value) is also questionable.
    Studebaker chose steel stampings because the were monetarily cheaper, and they lasted through the warranty period.

    I have sold hundreds of intake manifold gasket (sets). Have not had a single warranty issue.
    I'd like to see/discuss/hear about composite intake gasket failures on Stude V8 engines, so I can help prevent customer problems in the future.
    Usually, a failed intake gasket has to do with other issues besides the gasket itself.
    The last failure of a composite gasket that I personally experienced was due to a warped intake/exhaust manifold (on a Champ six).
    Have experienced burn through of composite intake gaskets that has the heat crossover blocked.
    That is to be expected, and there is a solution to that issue (if the users choice is to block that off, which an AACA car would most likely not use)

    Good question by the OP.
    Replies so far are...interesting.

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  • Bud
    replied
    I've had the fiber gaskets split after they have been in service for a while. Like Doofus says, the failures have to do with heating and cooling of the engine. The fiber gaskets are usually a bit cheaper than the steel gaskets, but in my opinion, spend the money for steel gaskets. Bud

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  • doofus
    replied
    Hi Allen, played a Shade tree mechanic till Govt sent me to school ( numerous times) then sent me to desert! no trees, guess i was pro mech then. I prefer the factory steel gaskets and spray copper coat around ports,factory knew something way back then. I have seen fiber gaskets blow out or get sucked in in some cases on hard working Studes, there still out there you know. the intake "Grows ".015or so when heated and steel allows for this i guess. Luck Doofus

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  • Which type of intake manifold gaskets are best

    I'm preparing our 1954 Commander Starliner for the AACA Grand National meet in Williamsport, PA in June. I have to redetail the engine and repaint some of its parts. In doing so, I'll have to remove the intake manifold and, of course, will have to replace the intake manifold gaskets. Studebaker Internaational has both metal gaskets and composition ones. They're both the same price. Is one better than the other, or are there advantages to one over the other?
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