Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Clutch fluttering noise

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Clutch/Torque Converter: Clutch fluttering noise

    Gene Shambaugh

  • #2
    Is the engine mated to it's original bell housing? If not, did you "dial it in" during assembly. I did you check for alignment when bolting everything together? Even a small amount of "run-out" could cause "scuffing" creating the noise you are describing. How about vibration? Is your shift lever moving around when you are going down the road?

    How about drive shaft balance? Just a few things to check.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

    Comment


    • #3
      Are all the The fingers on the pressure the same height? only way to check was when trans was out using a dial or digital caliper. If one or more of the three is out of adjustment it could cause throwout bearing to rattle. Lou Cote

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes it's the original bell housing. What do you mean John by dialing it in during assembly? The original tranny was the same, but without over drive, they both measured the same. I slid right together. The shift lever dose not move or vibrate. I don't feel any vibration at all.
        I did't check the finger height with a dial indicator, I just thought being new they were ok. That little wire clip on the throw out bearing is a suspect to me. Is that suppose to hold the bearing against or away from the clutch plate? I wish they would of put an inspection plate on the bottom of the bell housing.
        I didn't get an email so I didn't think anyone had replyed.
        Thanks for your help.
        Gene Shambaugh

        Comment


        • #5
          A rebuilt pressure plate (even from a dealer) doesn't necessarily mean the fingers are set correctly. The last one I installed in a Model A had all 6 fingers off by quite a bit and not even. Luckily it had self locking nuts, so it was easy to readjust. A piece of aluminum channel with a bolt and nut in the center to check the height is easy to make, and a good tool to quickly reset the arms.
          Last edited by TWChamp; 02-19-2016, 11:50 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            could be spring chatter that holds the throwout bearing in place.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Drifter22 View Post
              Yes it's the original bell housing. What do you mean John by dialing it in during assembly? The original tranny was the same, but without over drive, they both measured the same. I slid right together. The shift lever dose not move or vibrate. I don't feel any vibration at all.
              I did't check the finger height with a dial indicator, I just thought being new they were ok. That little wire clip on the throw out bearing is a suspect to me. Is that suppose to hold the bearing against or away from the clutch plate? I wish they would of put an inspection plate on the bottom of the bell housing.
              I didn't get an email so I didn't think anyone had replyed.
              Thanks for your help.
              Gene, your question makes me think you don't have a shop manual for your Studebaker. You really need one. They are some of the best I've ever seen. Like a lot of us, I'm guilty of diving into a job and not referring to the manual until I get into trouble.

              Studebaker made their bellhousings with some amount of "adjustability" built in, so that they could get the concentric balance of the drive line tweaked to eliminate vibration. They did it with an alignment tool, and a dial indicator. Although there were special alignment tools, many of us have devised "work-arounds." Some have posted pics. It has been so long since I've done it, I'll have to re-learn next time I need to do it. Once aligned, they installed dowel pins to "set" the alignment. My description is oversimplified, but you really need the manual. I have a 1953 and a 1959 shop manual, and the instructions regarding bellhousing alignment is pretty much the same.

              If it will make you feel any better, and everything runs as smooth as you describe..the suggestion about the throw-out (release) bearing assembly is a likely culprit, and not all that complicated. I had one to make strange noises, but was still working. when that happened, I was much younger, and would crawl under a vehicle and start wrenching away just because I was curious. What I found was that the bearing retainer spring had either broken or come loose and worn away one of the metal loops on one side of the assembly. Replacing the bearing assembly solved the noise, and it was working great, years later, when I sold the car.

              One more thing about the throwout bearing...don't clean it with solvents. It is a sealed perma-lube bearing. Washing or soaking one in any kind of solvent will get past the seal, destroy and wash out the lubrication.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8
                If the original transmission was the same but with no overdrive, it was more than likely a T86.
                The T85 was used on the supercharged engines and some trucks.
                Robert Kapteyn

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Guys for all of your help. I guess the only way to find the problem is to pull the tranny. I do have the shop manuals for this car, guess I should of payed more attention.
                  Gene Shambaugh

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Clutch chatter is usually caused by misalignment, it could be inherent, as runout tolerances can be .004 plus some movement in the bellhousing could add .001 - .0015 plus some movement in the transmission plus .001 - .0015. This could add up to .007.
                    .000 is perfect, .001 - .0015 is ideal, .004 is acceptable, and beyond that is questionable.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X