Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Fuel pump

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fuel System: Fuel pump

    I know this topic had been beat to death, so I want to kick it while it's down . Has anyone used the "new and improved" 4227 Airtex pump with any reviews?. The pump went out last night while cruising around (looks like it was a fairly newish replacement), I had a new Airtex on standby and an hour in a parking lot and we where cruising again. I'm going to watch the pump to see if it leaks, but want to still have a spare. Can the Airtex be rebuilt to be reliable, if so what needs to be done or should I get one from a Studebaker vendor (if so which one). I refuse to get an electric pump.

    If anyone has a stock pump for a '60 Lark 259 2bbl in good rebuildable shape please pm me.

    Remember this is a stock 259 2bbl so no hipo pumps.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	1-23-16 fuel pump-1.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	84.6 KB
ID:	1750264Click image for larger version

Name:	1-23-16 fuel pump-2.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	71.2 KB
ID:	1750265

  • #2
    Sad to say, my results with Airtex have been mixed at best.

    I strongly recommend an original type Carter along with an electric "kicker." In fact I have such on the '55 Powerhawk and a '63 Lark that I drove daily for a period in the late 1990's through about 2002.

    Of course, today's lousy gasoline doesn't help any...


    (Oh, don't underestimate the value of a filter between the tank and the pump.)
    Last edited by GrumpyOne; 01-24-2016, 11:53 AM. Reason: addition

    Comment


    • #3
      I've read about JB Weld over the pin but is the actuator rod seal the one that leaks?
      Click image for larger version

Name:	airtex4227techm.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	140.8 KB
ID:	1703496

      Comment


      • #4
        Put a Wanted Ad in the Studebaker Swap Page World Wide Website asking for a Original Carter either Metal Filter bowl or Glass.

        You should be able to buy one cheap from one of these fools that have replaced it with an Electric one.

        Then rebuild it with a Ethanol resistant repair kit. You will be good for another 20 Years.
        Last edited by StudeRich; 01-24-2016, 11:00 PM.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

        Comment


        • #5
          Click image for larger version

Name:	20150909_152926.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	47.1 KB
ID:	1703499Click image for larger version

Name:	20150909_152915.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	49.4 KB
ID:	1703500Click image for larger version

Name:	20150909_152805.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	42.6 KB
ID:	1703501Click image for larger version

Name:	20150909_152751.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	34.5 KB
ID:	1703502

          I have these pumps if you need one.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hate to purposely draw the ire of the purists here but I have used the airtex "carter" on my 289 for the last 5 years without any trouble. I did however , before I installed it, sealed the pin with JB weld. Clean and roughen the surface with medium grit sandpaper and let the JB weld set for 48 hours before installation and it should never leak. At least mine hasn't yet.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tim333 View Post
              [ATTACH=CONFIG]50916[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]50917[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]50918[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]50919[/ATTACH]

              I have these pumps if you need one.
              All of these are AC Design Airtex, sold as: Airtex, Champ, (Replacement Carter), Master etc. all '55-'64 Stude. V8.

              They match the Pictures in post #3.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

              Comment


              • #8
                Does it look like these? Also what V8s and years do they cover. BTW the picture of the fuel pump taken apart isn't mine it's from Bob's site.
                Click image for larger version

Name:	s-l1600.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	48.6 KB
ID:	1703506
                Click image for larger version

Name:	s-l1600.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	86.8 KB
ID:	1703507

                Comment


                • #9
                  I sent You a PM.

                  Originally posted by 1oldtimer View Post
                  I know this topic had been beat to death, so I want to kick it while it's down . Has anyone used the "new and improved" 4227 Airtex pump with any reviews?. The pump went out last night while cruising around (looks like it was a fairly newish replacement), I had a new Airtex on standby and an hour in a parking lot and we where cruising again. I'm going to watch the pump to see if it leaks, but want to still have a spare. Can the Airtex be rebuilt to be reliable, if so what needs to be done or should I get one from a Studebaker vendor (if so which one). I refuse to get an electric pump.

                  If anyone has a stock pump for a '60 Lark 259 2bbl in good rebuildable shape please pm me.

                  Remember this is a stock 259 2bbl so no hipo pumps.

                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]50899[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]50900[/ATTACH]
                  Joseph R. Zeiger

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The longer bowl assembly may not clear the steering. These pumps were made for multiple uses and configurations and may be adapted to marine or for a tractor use. The assembly has holes to attach a bail and glass bowl or it may be assembled with a metal bowl. There is a center threaded hole for the metal bowl or two insert holes to attach a bail and glass bowl. Some of the top assemblies are interchangeable with several different models, some have two sets of holes for different assemblies. I bought a fuel pump for a Perkins tractor engine because in the catalog it looked identical to the Stude. The pump did not fit however the top assembly was interchangeable with the stude pump. The castings are made to allow the fuel to enter from several directions, some castings are threaded on each side and some are not. Some have a plug in the casting that needs to be drilled out and some are threaded plugs. Threading a blank casting is relative simple, most are 3/8" parallel pipe. The insert should be a parallel pipe and tighten up against a flange and composition washer to avoid leaking. An over tightened taper pipe thread can crack a housing.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X