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harmonic balancer installation

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  • Engine: harmonic balancer installation

    Attempting to install R1 harmonic balancer. Have fabulous pusher tool from equally fabulous Phil at Fairborn;
    So- have pushed on until resistance is felt, and am loathe to go any further and possibly cause damage..

    Unfortunately I cannot load up pics, but it looks as if it should go on further -end of crank is still 3/4" or 20mm from being flush with front of balancer.1. Is this OK?
    2. does anyone have any pics of front on and side on correctly installed? Cheers, Quentin.

  • #2
    Yes...the damper needs to be in full contact with the crank gear.
    A light oil should have been used to help things along.

    Also, be sure that there is no burrs on the crank, the damper or the key.

    I'd say, pull it back off, check for burrs noted above, put some light oil on both the I.D. of the damper and the crank shaft, install...and just push it home. Some times they take a little effort.
    Note - It also helps a lot to have the threads on the installer tool lubed well.

    If it feels like you might be bending the shank of the installation tool or highly overloading the tool, might be best to check the dimensions of the parts. A .0015" to .0025" press fit should be plenty of interference.

    Mike

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    • #3
      Check the key in the crank. Sometimes they get a little off, or have a bur on it.
      1962 Champ

      51 Commander 4 door

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't know what you mean by being in contact with the crank gear -how does one tell if there is contact with crank gear? Also, there is a large slinger washer and a fuel pump cam in the way. Subsequently it must be very close to the slinger washer - I assumed this was the resistance.
        At the front of the balancer, I have 3/4" or 20mm of hollow before the beginning of the crank. Is this supposed to be flush? If not, what is acceptable? Pics would help.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have no idea what fuel pump cam you would mean. None of the Studebaker V8's I have had used a fuel pump cam on the crank. The camshaft has a fuel pump gear bolted to the front of it but none of the cracks gears do. Are you sure you mean a fuel pump cam? If so I'm in the process of learning something.

          Len

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Skybolt View Post
            None of the Studebaker V8's I have had used a fuel pump cam on the crank.

            Len
            Sorry, my bad, knew it was in there somewhere. Anyway.........I am assuming the resistance is coming from the slinger washer. The balancer has gone in a fair way, but at risk of repetition, I have 3/4" or 20mm of hollow before the beginning of the crank. Is this supposed to be flush? If not, what is acceptable? Pics would help.
            Last edited by Quentin; 12-26-2015, 05:22 AM.

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            • #7
              I would remove the damper and take some measurements so you know how far it should fit onto the shaft. Then follow what Mike and Kurt said.

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              • #8
                The damper should never be flush with the end of the crank. It always should have the crank recessed so pressure can be maintained by the crankshaft screw. This in turn keeps pressure on the crank gear, which controls crankshaft end play.
                Bad things happen with too much end play. 3/4 inch of space sounds excessive.

                Jim

                Comment


                • #9
                  Agree with Jim in #8. I do not have one handy to measure, and not sure if there is a difference for 'R' motor dampners. But there is a difference between short and long snouted cranks (early v. late), which affects how much space remains once the dampner is seated. I'd look closely in the Shop Manual, and if needed, disassemble, and measure everything, so as to know how much space to expect upon assembly.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    On the Avanti R1 I just finished, the crank is recessed about 3/4" - so I think you are good.
                    78 Avanti RQB 2792
                    64 Avanti R1 R5408
                    63 Avanti R1 R4551
                    63 Avanti R1 R2281
                    62 GT Hawk V15949
                    56 GH 6032504
                    56 GH 6032588
                    55 Speedster 7160047
                    55 Speedster 7165279

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                    • #11
                      When the damper "bottoms" (the resistance block you are sensing) there will be about .750" depth from the outer face of the damper to the actual crankshaft nose end. I believe you have seated the damper to the front side of the slinger which is correct.
                      Start and Stage Your Studebakers

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                      • #12
                        The final installation torque needs to be pretty high.

                        This may be right.
                        http://www.tpocr.com/studebakerts.html

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
                          Yes...the damper needs to be in full contact with the crank gear.
                          A light oil should have been used to help things along.

                          Also, be sure that there is no burrs on the crank, the damper or the key.

                          I'd say, pull it back off, check for burrs noted above, put some light oil on both the I.D. of the damper and the crank shaft, install...and just push it home. Some times they take a little effort.
                          Note - It also helps a lot to have the threads on the installer tool lubed well.

                          If it feels like you might be bending the shank of the installation tool or highly overloading the tool, might be best to check the dimensions of the parts. A .0015" to .0025" press fit should be plenty of interference. Mike
                          It sounds like you have "been there done that" more than a few times Mike, have you ever been able to successfully use the R1 Balancer on a short Nose early Crank that it was not designed for, like the OP has?
                          StudeRich
                          Second Generation Stude Driver,
                          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It is a 1963 long nose crank, as is my other P engine with the ordinary pulley assembly. Also the engine I am working on is a JT block and crank. However, it came as a short block that needed fitment of all and sundry. I successfully installed the R1 balancer today; however, due to lack off time (3 days) left in the workshop I have to get this car mobile. I have major issues with pulley alignment with the water pump and alternator, especially as the alternator is on the left on a home made bracket (previous owner moved it due to air con), and no suitable spacer for the water pump pulley to move it out an inch or so. Subsequently I have installed the standard steel disc and pulley for the time being to get mobile.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Quentin View Post
                              It is a 1963 long nose crank, as is my other P engine with the ordinary pulley assembly. Also the engine I am working on is a JT block and crank. However, it came as a short block that needed fitment of all and sundry. I successfully installed the R1 balancer today; however, due to lack off time (3 days) left in the workshop I have to get this car mobile. I have major issues with pulley alignment with the water pump and alternator, especially as the alternator is on the left on a home made bracket (previous owner moved it due to air con), and no suitable spacer for the water pump pulley to move it out an inch or so. Subsequently I have installed the standard steel disc and pulley for the time being to get mobile.
                              Sounds like lack of time is kinda pushing you out the door. But also sounds like you are creative, thus good at, "making do" to keep the project moving. You can always come back later and make it, "correct" when you have the parts, and more time on your hands. Lots of folks would let a project like that drag out another year, while waiting on all the, "correct" parts. Meanwhile, you'll be miles down the road, smiling all the way.

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