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Oilleak in valley cover

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  • Other: Oilleak in valley cover

    I have an early 289 with a Cater 4 barrel with the PCV at the base of the carb. I rebuilt the engine and it is leaking oil around the rear fitting in the valley cover where the hose runs from the carb base to the valley cover. The valve in the carb seems to be free as I can hear it rattling like open and closing. I am wondering if when it gets hot it gums up and maybe that is causing the leak. The rear 3 inches or so has the oil. Any ideas will be appreciated. Thanks.

  • #2
    Check the valve cover gaskets first, oil doesn't flow up hill. Then check the grommets holding the valley cover, and the inlet grommet of that hose.

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    • #3
      It could also be the distributor base gasket leaking.

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      • #4
        If you have an oil pressure gauge equipped car then I would check the flex hose from the engine to the hard line on the firewall. If that is original have it replaced too.
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        • #5
          You mention the PCV Valve IN the Carb. That worries me, because a Studebaker PCV Valve goes in the Hose, if it is screwed INTO the Carb. it could have the wrong direction of Flow. It should restrict flow AWAY from the Carb. and allow it TO the Carb.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            It is a Carter AFB and the middle of the rear of the carb has a Carter C-37299 screwed into the carb. There is a hose nipple on the end of it and the hose exits in the rear of the valley cover.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Studeguy61 View Post
              It is a Carter AFB and the middle of the rear of the carb has a Carter C-37299 screwed into the carb. There is a hose nipple on the end of it and the hose exits in the rear of the valley cover.
              Just for "fun" remove the hose from the valley cover, blow into it-should allow it easily-then suck on it, should act like a stopper and not let you. I don't trust just jiggling it to test it. To get enough oil vapor in that hose to make it leak that much at the grommet, would take a lot of blow by, or oil splashing madly in the lifter galley, like it's not draining to the pan.

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              • #8
                I don't think early or late has anything to do with the PCV, in many cases it was a State requirement. All the engines were designed for a draft tube except where State laws required a PVC system. I have three 259 engines all with different configurations,
                VC 21416 has a draft tube, V588353 has what appears to be a factory PCV system and VCN 303 appears to have an after market system with a fitting welded to the valley cover where the PC valve is threaded in to and then into the base of the carb, with additionally a vent hose from the breather cap directly in to the air cleaner. I am pro draft tube only.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by altair View Post
                  /Cut/VCN 303 appears to have an after market system with a fitting welded to the valley cover where the PC valve is threaded in to and then into the base of the carb, with additionally a vent hose from the breather cap directly in to the air cleaner. I am pro draft tube only.
                  What you have here is a late '64 Engine with a Factory correct 1964 fitting in your Lifter Cover for a PCV, if it ONLY had that, it would be a 1st. Generation South Bend '64, but since it is a Second Generation '64 from Hamilton Production it has the "Upper Kit" Sealed System on it also, which was mandated in the year 1964 but not 1963 for '64 Production, that is the Sealed cap on one side and Hose Fitting Oil Cap with Hose to Air Cleaner on the other.

                  The PCV System is a very good thing especially in above the equator areas where moisture from condensation builds up in the Engine and is drawn out by the system, both the Standard Engine System and the Jet Thrust PCV System work VERY well, I would never disable them.
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                  • #10
                    Thank you for the info I didn't know VCN 303 was a late 64 I looked up the numbers and "N" is December and the three digit numbers are 1964. Also with these engines valley covers and valve covers can be changed to complicate the ident.

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