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  • #16
    I have installed chrome rings in several V8 Studes, the last one 3-4 years and about 35,000 miles ago. They take about 3000 miles to break in, but require no special procedures. Just drive it, change the oil after the first 500 miles, then keep driving it. Keep an eye on the oil level, and it will be fine. Whether your car has cast or chrome rings, it matters not. Just drive it. Its a sign the rings are breaking in when the oil mileage begins to go up. Some things do not need to be complicated.

    Oh, did I mention, just drive it?
    Last edited by JoeHall; 10-19-2015, 04:57 PM.

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    • #17
      new information. Engine may have 1000 miles on it, and 250 of those were up and down a 7 mile hill, with an altitude change from 160' to 1350', 700' of the rise in 6 miles and 500' rise in the last mile. Knowing that where do I stand?
      1949 2r5 28196
      170ci 6cyl
      4spd

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Old Radio Tech View Post
        new information. Engine may have 1000 miles on it, and 250 of those were up and down a 7 mile hill, with an altitude change from 160' to 1350', 700' of the rise in 6 miles and 500' rise in the last mile. Knowing that where do I stand?
        See post #16. Happy motoring

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        • #19
          Oh I plan on driving it, no matter what. We have lots of 45 mph roads here, which seems to be right in the middle of the power range in high gear. I bought it to drive, not show.
          1949 2r5 28196
          170ci 6cyl
          4spd

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
            I have installed chrome rings in several V8 Studes, the last one 3-4 years and about 35,000 miles ago. They take about 3000 miles to break in, but require no special procedures. Just drive it, change the oil after the first 500 miles, then keep driving it. Keep an eye on the oil level, and it will be fine. Whether your car has cast or chrome rings, it matters not. Just drive it. Its a sign the rings are breaking in when the oil mileage begins to go up. Some things do not need to be complicated.

            Oh, did I mention, just drive it?
            Joe's point is well-taken. The Champion is an early last century agricultural machine, designed and built in a wagon factory. Nothing complicated or delicate about it. Just drive it hard and let us know how it goes.
            PackardV8

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            • #21
              Thanks everyone. And I am going to hold off on a PCV. Next is speedo, front turn signals, temp, rear end, grease, door mechanisms and locks.
              1949 2r5 28196
              170ci 6cyl
              4spd

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              • #22
                Engine remanufacturing technology and procedures have improved over the years to a point where engine break-in is almost eliminated. Boring and honing procedures are very different to day than years ago and also ring designs have improved greatly. The above break-in procedures appear to be redundant with current machining procedures and ring design. Generally new cars today do not require extensive break-in procedures. 40 to 50 years ago general break-in procedures were mandatory because of the crude machining procedures and you were lucky to get 50,000 miles on a rebuild. Modern engines commonly get 300,000 miles and almost never get rebuilt. Suspension, transmissions and bodies usually give in first, this is all attributed to a high quality of engine design. Two of my last cars were over 300,000 miles when retired, the suspension and bodies were shot

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by altair View Post
                  Engine remanufacturing technology and procedures have improved over the years to a point where engine break-in is almost eliminated. Boring and honing procedures are very different to day than years ago and also ring designs have improved greatly. The above break-in procedures appear to be redundant with current machining procedures and ring design. Generally new cars today do not require extensive break-in procedures. 40 to 50 years ago general break-in procedures were mandatory because of the crude machining procedures and you were lucky to get 50,000 miles on a rebuild. Modern engines commonly get 300,000 miles and almost never get rebuilt. Suspension, transmissions and bodies usually give in first, this is all attributed to a high quality of engine design. Two of my last cars were over 300,000 miles when retired, the suspension and bodies were shot
                  This is great information if you own a 2015 Model, but not applicable at all to our 50's and 60's Built Vehicles or even 2015 rebuilds.
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                  • #24
                    Paul - Do not hold at 50, Accelerate (in high gear) from 30 to 50 at full throttle.
                    Then lift and let it coast down & cool off.

                    The object is to apply full power without getting things too hot.
                    I am not talking radiator hot, I mean rings, pistons, & cylinder walls.

                    Do not do this if your tuneup is not spot on.
                    If the motor is complaining stop and fix the tuneup.

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                    • #25
                      this is the time you "don't" want OD in that little 6... or at least don't engage for several hundred 1st miles...

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                      • #26
                        All interesting and useful comments.

                        All I would add is that a PCV is not a band-aid for a smoking engine.
                        (But I am a big proponent for a PCV, because a properly plumbed PCV 'closed' system keeps the outside of your engine clean)

                        My break in procedure is a little more suburban in nature.
                        I was taught to go out with your fresh engine and put it in low gear.
                        Accellerate to your target high rpm (say 4,567.89 rpm
                        ), and let the engine pull the speed down.
                        Do that a half dozen times.
                        Then do the same in second gear.

                        That way the rings see the max and min on cylinder pressures (working both edges of the piston rings).
                        Drive it normal after that, but avoid long runs at the same RPM's (no 200 mile trips at 55 mph).
                        Change the oil and filter after the first 500 miles.

                        My .02 worth....
                        Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 10-20-2015, 06:27 AM.
                        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                        Jeff


                        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                        • #27
                          A well done PCV can keep oil a lot cleaner than a road draft system, especially under dusty or short trip or low speed conditions.

                          A decade or so before PCV was required for emissions reasons in the early 60s, at least one fairly well known car/truck manufacturer offered it as an option for their commercial vehicles, and reportedly made it standard on all Forward Control ( Cab Over Engine?) trucks. Yes, it requires a carb re-adjustment due to the extra "air" introduced into the intake.

                          About the same time For a brief period FRAM offered a product that positively ventilated the crankcase, but apparently just spewed the fixin's and leavin's out the road draft tube.

                          And of course during the development of the Studebaker V8 SW Sparrow and the boys uncovered some "unconventional" Crankcase Ventilation behavior, and rectified it. That to me points out providing a road draft tube and an inlet filter and a meandering ventilation path through the crankcase //may// not be enough.

                          And of course a few pressure relieving breathers in the rocker cover etc will not scavenge the bad stuff that does real damage over time.
                          Attached Files

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                          • #28
                            WWII Jeeps also used a PCV system. Mainly to allow crossing deep water as I was proudly shown by a Vet with a 41? Jeep at an auto show last year.

                            Bob

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                            • #29
                              I think after learning that my truck did the hill climbing it did, break-in is moot.
                              1949 2r5 28196
                              170ci 6cyl
                              4spd

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