Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Remove rear brake drum from hub.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Brakes: Remove rear brake drum from hub.

    I am going to separate the brake drum from the tapered hub and slightly enlarge the hole that the stud goes through. I want to be able to take the drum off without having to remove the tapered hub from the axle. Then it would be like a flanged axle when you want to remove the drum to check brake parts and pieces. I have done this on the 2 piece tapered axles on Jeeps with no problems. The drum will still center up on the tapered part of the wheel studs as long as you don't enlarge the holes in the drum to much. Does anyone see any problem with doing this that I am missing or haven't thought of? Appreciate any input. Thanks. Bruce.
    1958 Transtar 3E6-122
    1958 Transtar 3E13-31
    1959 Transtar 4E7-122
    1959 Lark 2 door Wagon
    1960 Transtar 5E28-171
    1960 Lark Gasser
    1963 Daytona

  • #2
    It's been done before. You have to be sure you don't cut too much of the lug swedging to remove the drum, else the drum will not center on the hub and the eccentric rotation will drive you nuts. Why not try removing the entire hub, etc as outlined in the manual, service the brakes as required and when you reassemble, just don't tighten the crap out of the axle nut.
    I can get my hubs off with minimum of effort (64 GT Hawk) because they're only wrenched down to maybe 120 Ft/lbs (if that). The hardest part of it all is mounting the damn hub puller. The manual installation instruction says to crank it to 170 ft/lbs, but I doubt anyone ever achieves that number. As long as you don't plan on any road racing, "good and tight" is plenty...
    ...and don't use any lube on the axle...
    64 GT Hawk (K7)
    1970 Avanti (R3)

    Comment


    • #3
      be careful if your hub/drum set has balance weights. Many Studes had weights welded onto the "drum" to balance the "set". If you remove and don't align by same lugs....out of balance. Also, unless you're drum is near perfect, you'll probably create an out of balance combo for sure. Tho not a real problem out back.

      Comment


      • #4
        I already have the hub and drum assembly off.The drums are in great shape and have been turned not long ago. I repacked the axle bearings and had to adjust the play in both axles. Ended up with no shims on one side and one very thin shim on the other side. I made a tool to install those axle buttons or whatever you call them. Those are a real pain in the butt!! Poor design by Dana in my opinion. Glad they finally got away from those. The later Dana axles I have don't use them. Tapered or flanged.
        I just thought separating the hub and drum would be a lot better if I needed to look at them when I was away from home. That probably would be pretty rare as I have never had to with any of my vehicles over the last 50 years when I started driving longer distances.
        1958 Transtar 3E6-122
        1958 Transtar 3E13-31
        1959 Transtar 4E7-122
        1959 Lark 2 door Wagon
        1960 Transtar 5E28-171
        1960 Lark Gasser
        1963 Daytona

        Comment


        • #5
          I have done this job on my Lark and had no problems although I didn't enlarge the stud holes at all. It did take a dead blow hammer to remove them later but it was better than a loose fit. I have read about installing the drum then applying the brake to center the drum but I have never done it that way. I did remove the swaging and press the studs out but that was it. Installing new Volvo studs allows the drum to fit tight on the studs, although the shoulder does protrude further so some wheels might not fit flush with the drum. I would also follow Jack's advice about the drum/hub location and balance. It might not show up but why not keep them as a balanced set. Easy to mark with a letter, number or just a regular punch.

          Len

          Comment


          • #6
            MCCAB1, I believe you will find that ALL Twin Traction Diff's. have the Axle spacer "Button" on each axle, the ones you found without, were all Open Rear Ends, not limited Slip. I do not think age has anything to do with it.

            Also Axle Shims do not belong on the Left side and no "adjustment" is needed, it is all done on the Right side.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment


            • #7
              I have later year Dana 44's with posi's out of Jeeps and they do not have axle buttons and they were tapered axles. I have never found flanged Dana axles with axle buttons posi or open! Seems like only the tapered Dana's had them in the 1960's. All twin trac's do not have these axle buttons. Maybe when Studebaker was using them they did. I have found quite a few left side axles with shims. I also found two rear ends with shims on both sides. Didn't seem to be a big deal and they worked fine. It should not matter which side has shims. After I have taken a few of the twin tracs apart the way they are built in the middle where the buttons go it would not matter as far as I could tell.
              1958 Transtar 3E6-122
              1958 Transtar 3E13-31
              1959 Transtar 4E7-122
              1959 Lark 2 door Wagon
              1960 Transtar 5E28-171
              1960 Lark Gasser
              1963 Daytona

              Comment


              • #8
                Torque the axle nut to the proper spec. Do not do it loose like 64V-K7 What de does not realize is that the key way mearly holds the hub in proper position but it the friction of the taper that holds the hub fast. Not torquing the nut down is asking for problems.
                If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

                65 2dr sedan
                64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
                61 V8 Tcab
                63 Tcab 20R powered
                55 Commander Wagon
                54 Champion Wagon
                46 Gibson Model A
                50 JD MC
                45 Agricat
                67 Triumph T100
                66 Bultaco Matadore

                Comment


                • #9
                  agreed on the proper torque for the axle. We just had pics of a spent axle/keyway (and probably hub too) which may have been under torqued. If you replace with new brake cylinders (cheap), and your drums are good..... DO you think you'll ever need rear brakes in 30K miles ? Leave well enough alone and torque correctly....GL

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I just did this all the way around on my '61 Hawk. I had to put 3" studs in so I could use the speedster bolt-on wheel covers on 6" wheels. I found the easiest way to remove the old ones was to use a cutoff wheel and cut them flush to the drum then knock the button out. The new studs had a .625 knurl and fit fairly tight but I tack welded on the button side. It is nice to be able to remove the rear drum without having to pull the hub.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To me, it sounds like a lot of labor for very little benefit. Total up the hours of labor required to do the conversion right, plus the cost of the studs, if you wind up having to replace them, and it will probably amount to the time it would take to simply use the hub puller you already have for the next two anticipated brake jobs.
                      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gordr View Post
                        To me, it sounds like a lot of labor for very little benefit. Total up the hours of labor required to do the conversion right, plus the cost of the studs, if you wind up having to replace them, and it will probably amount to the time it would take to simply use the hub puller you already have for the next two anticipated brake jobs.
                        You are right but there is always more than one way to look at it.

                        I have a puller, flanged axles and hubs separated from the drums with new studs, for different applications. I like the idea that if something does go wrong with the rear brakes away from home I don't have to carry a hub puller, plus the tools to use it. I have never had anything go wrong but some people like to preempt trouble if possible. I went the flanged axle route as I have seen first hand a tapered axle brake. Also just having a special tool to get access to do a brake job is too much for some. Doing the hub drum separation job can be done with regular tools and then from there on out the brakes can be accessed with no hassles. Of course one has to have a hub puller to do that job in the first place. And so we go around in a circle.

                        Len

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Agreed, if one wants the "convenience" of easily-removable drums, then the way to do it is to get the full-meal deal, and install a set of flanged axles, too. That eliminates the risk of tapered-axle failure. I put "convenience" in quotes because sometimes, removable drums aren't all that convenient. I have had them, on both Studes and brand X, get very tightly stuck by rust. And, if you have done a good job of service on the brakes in the first place, an unexpected breakdown in that department is really unlikely to happen. Besides, we have this wonderful network of Studebaker friends right here on this forum, so if something like that does happen, I can get on the Forum, and say "Hey, I'm broke down in East Armpit. Any Stude folks nearby with a hub puller?"
                          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by studebakerkid View Post
                            Torque the axle nut to the proper spec. Do not do it loose like 64V-K7 What de does not realize is that the key way mearly holds the hub in proper position but it the friction of the taper that holds the hub fast. Not torquing the nut down is asking for problems.

                            X2......... Pay attention to this unless you like surprises!!! It is very important to treat these tapered axles "BY THE BOOK". And it's dangerous not to.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The shop manual says to torque to 170 ft. lbs. and then to next slot in nut for cotter key. I didn't think it would be quite that much torque but I am putting the hub and drum assembly back on today. I already installed my Turner disc brake kit on the front.
                              What a great kit. Everything fit perfectly. I have boxed up the original complete disc brake system from the 64 cruiser and it is for sale. Brackets, dust shield, calipers, and rotors and hub assembly. Rotors are in good condition with some surface rust only. I don't know what it would be a fair price. The calipers need rebuilt. Thanks for all the input. Bruce
                              1958 Transtar 3E6-122
                              1958 Transtar 3E13-31
                              1959 Transtar 4E7-122
                              1959 Lark 2 door Wagon
                              1960 Transtar 5E28-171
                              1960 Lark Gasser
                              1963 Daytona

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X