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Speedo Cable Oil

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  • Speedo/Tach/Gauges: Speedo Cable Oil

    The needle on my GT Hawk is vibrating. Is WD40 okay?...any pointers out there?
    Lou Van Anne
    62 Champ
    64 R2 GT Hawk
    79 Avanti II

  • #2
    Originally posted by Lou Van Anne View Post
    The needle on my GT Hawk is vibrating. Is WD40 okay?...any pointers out there?
    No, Lou; it is not. It's too thin.

    Go to NAPA or somewhere and buy a bottle of legitimate speedometer cable lubricant, which has lot of graphite in it. The product I have and use is called Kable-Ease, manufactured by A.G.S. Company of Muskegon MI. This little bottle is so old, however, that I don't know if they are still in business. (It's been awhile since speedometers were cable-driven, you know...)

    Disconnect the cable and service as Joe describes below. I like to let the fluid gradually drain down into the cable and casing overnight to get lots of it in there.

    It's not the easiest job in the world, but it'll "git 'er done," as Larry the Cable Guy would say. BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 05-14-2015, 09:05 PM.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #3
      I use ATF, and/or powdered graphite. Disconnect it at the tranny first, and then at the speedo. From the speedo end, pull the core all the way out, then lube it as you re-install it. Re-install it on the speedo end first, then down at the tranny.

      Also a good idea, while the speedo is disconnected, remove and lube it. Once removed, use dikes to snag and remove the metal plug on the shaft drive body, just up from the cable threads. Then put a drop or two of light oil in the plug hole, while twirling the speedo drive with thumb and index finger. Once the oil starts to come out around the twirling shaft, re-install the plug, then re-install the speedo and cable. NOTE: do not lay the speedo on its face during this procedure, or oil may get into the facing area. Hold it horizontally in your hand.

      The above steps should get you at least another 50,000 miles in the car before it will need serviced again

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank You guys!
        Lou Van Anne
        62 Champ
        64 R2 GT Hawk
        79 Avanti II

        Comment


        • #5
          Bob,

          AGS is/was American Grease Stick. They are still around.

          http://agscompany.com/product/kable-...card-hardware/
          Frank DuVal

          50 Commander 4 door

          Comment


          • #6
            Soooo, they would probably be the MFG. of "Door Ease" a handy non-staining grease/lube Stick I keep around for Lubing the Door Strikers, Latches and Door Stops.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment


            • #7
              What are dykes?
              "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

              Comment


              • #8
                Dykes; are some sort of female. Or so I have been told.
                As for Dikes; it is short for diagonal pliers.
                Ron

                Comment


                • #9
                  Oops. Wrong spelling.
                  "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dykes is also an old very comprehensive shop manual that tells you everything about auto repair, from how to set up your shop, to how to rebuild your tar top battery.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                      No, Lou; it is not. It's too thin.

                      Go to NAPA or somewhere and buy a bottle of legitimate speedometer cable lubricant, which has lot of graphite in it. The product I have and use is called Kable-Ease, manufactured by A.G.S. Company of Muskegon MI. This little bottle is so old, however, that I don't know if they are still in business. (It's been awhile since speedometers were cable-driven, you know...)

                      Disconnect the cable and service as Joe describes below. I like to let the fluid gradually drain down into the cable and casing overnight to get lots of it in there.

                      It's not the easiest job in the world, but it'll "git 'er done," as Larry the Cable Guy would say. BP
                      Just googled Kable Ease and it is available in a 5 oz tube for around $3.00 at various stores.
                      sigpic
                      55 President Deluxe
                      64 Commander
                      66 Cruiser

                      37 Oldsmobile F37 4 Door

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Google? I provided the link in my answer!

                        Yes, the same company that makes Door-Ease. That's been around since I was a youngster.
                        Frank DuVal

                        50 Commander 4 door

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Use ONLY the correct lube for such cables--there are at least several brands. Not every auto parts store carries it any more. And, I found that those who don't were more than happy to tell me ALLLLLLL sorts of acceptable substitutes, which they did carry, of course. Yeah, right. All the best!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                            I use ATF, and/or powdered graphite. Disconnect it at the tranny first, and then at the speedo. From the speedo end, pull the core all the way out, then lube it as you re-install it. Re-install it on the speedo end first, then down at the tranny.

                            Also a good idea, while the speedo is disconnected, remove and lube it. Once removed, use dikes to snag and remove the metal plug on the shaft drive body, just up from the cable threads. Then put a drop or two of light oil in the plug hole, while twirling the speedo drive with thumb and index finger. Once the oil starts to come out around the twirling shaft, re-install the plug, then re-install the speedo and cable. NOTE: do not lay the speedo on its face during this procedure, or oil may get into the facing area. Hold it horizontally in your hand.

                            The above steps should get you at least another 50,000 miles in the car before it will need serviced again
                            Would clock oil work for the speedometer or would 3-in-1 be better?
                            "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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