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Rear axle noise (squeak) - 1957 Hawk

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  • Rear axle noise (squeak) - 1957 Hawk

    I'm experiencing a squeaking noise from the rear of my 57 Silver Hawk (289, auto, non TT). It seams to lessen when brakes are applied. It squeaks when the rear end is on jack stands as well.

    I changed the rear end gear oil. I replaced it with SAE 80-90 gear oil. I hope that is the right fluid. Still squeaks.

    Several articles said that there are pipe plugs in the axle housings that can be removed and grease fitting can be installed to grease the axles. I couldn't find these on my Hawk. Is there any other way to grease the rear axles?

    I've also greased the U-joints and drive shaft support bearing. Still have the squeak.

    Any other thoughts on where the squeak may be coming from?

    Thanks much, Mark



    Mark Rogers

  • #2
    Mark, there could be several possible sources of a squeak. Is the squeak continuous as the wheels rotate, or does it occur once per revolution? Any sign of a wobbling wheel?

    An axle could be slightly bent, allowing the edge of a brake shoe to make contact with the inside face of the drum.

    Dry axle bearings are more likely to rumble than squeak. Those pipe plugs should be there; they have a screwdriver slot in them, and they are quite a low profile, so can be easily missed under the usual buildup of crud. They are right in that part of the axle housing that bells out at the end. You can also pull the brake drums, then the axles, and manually repack the bearings, which is really the way to go. That allows you to set the axle shaft end play as well. See the shop manual.

    A cracked wheel rim can also make a squeak as the broken edges of the crack rub one another. If the car is on stands, try removing the rear wheels, and see if it still squeaks. If it does, remove the drums, and have a look-see. There are plenty of threads here on the proper way to remove rear drums!

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #3
      Gord,

      Thanks for the reply. The squeak is not constant, so I assume its close to once per revolution. It happens when its on jack stands too, so I doubt its load related.

      I give what you recommend next weekend. I have a 1955 shop manual. Will that work for the axle removal work or do I need something more current?

      I'll look again for the pipe plugs. I was looking near the rear end gears. I'll at the outer shaft. I'm assuming that these face the rear of the car? Not down or towards the front of the car. I should be able to find them.

      Thanks again. Mark

      Mark Rogers

      Comment


      • #4
        Mark, the '55 shop manual should suffice for drum removal on a standard rear axle, but not a TT rear axle.

        I THINK the pipe plugs are either on the top or bottom of the axle tube, but they are within about a half-inch of the brake backing plate, so they won't be all that hard to find. Studebaker put plugs in there because they are supposed to get only one squirt of grease at long intervals. If they had left Zerks in there, service station grease monkeys of the day would have pumped in grease until they saw it coming out somewhere.

        By the way, a dried-out U-joint can make a loud squeak, and because it's dried out, and the needles piled up, it's not necessarily loose, and could fool you on a "shake test." Have a close look at the U-joints, and be very suspicious if you see a film of powdery red rust around any of the rubber seals!

        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

        Comment


        • #5
          the pipe plugs are on the rear of the axle, facing almost directly back. The vents are on the very top of the axle and should be cleaned before pumping any grease in. Not sure what year they were dropped, I want to say either 57 or 58 though.

          nate

          --
          55 Commander Starlight
          http://members.cox.net/njnagel
          --
          55 Commander Starlight
          http://members.cox.net/njnagel

          Comment


          • #6
            Given what you've told us, I'd be thinking about a slightly distorted brake drum rubbing the backing plate at one point. If this is the case, the evidence would be a spot on one of the backing plates that's polished where it's being rubbed by the drum.[:I]

            Miscreant adrift in
            the BerStuda Triangle


            1957 Transtar 1/2ton
            1960 Larkvertible V8
            1958 Provincial wagon
            1953 Commander coupe

            No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with Mr. Biggs. I had a warped or bent brake drum on the rear of my 62, and when it was cold, would squeek badly. As it warmed up, it would lessen. Had to replace the drum to get it to go away. Also, worn self-adjuster parts can cause that kind of noise.

              Comment


              • #8
                Gang,

                Thanks for the leads. Now I have plenty of things to do this weekend. And, heck, I was just about to drive it into a big pool of oil to work the squeaks out. This manual labor stuff aught to be much more fun.

                Its amazing how much grease and grime can build up on the underbody of a car over 50 years. Its also neat how much can fall into your eye lids before it rolls down your face.

                I'm getting used to this 15W-40 cologne. The wife's not sold on it yet.

                Thanks again. Mark

                Mark Rogers

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mark,
                  Adjust your brake shoes in enough to pull the drums....
                  Pull the rear hub&drum(s)..
                  Put some white grease under the contact points where the shoes ride on the backing plates.
                  (inspect everything while you are in there)..
                  Rough up the shoes and drums with some 100 grit sandpaper ('X' pattern)
                  Reinstall the hub&drums.
                  Adjust the brakes.
                  Your squeak will most likely go away.
                  Even if it doesn't, your Stude will be better off with the brake check.
                  Hope the info helps.
                  Jeff[8D
                  ]
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The smell of Red Line Heavy Shockproof is downright sexy.

                    nate

                    (well, at least I find any woman that smells like Red Line sexy <G&gt

                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      This post will probably double their sales[:X]
                      Jeff[8D]
                      PS: But is the cleanup easy?[}]



                      quote:Originally posted by N8N

                      The smell of Red Line Heavy Shockproof is downright sexy.
                      (well, at least I find any woman that smells like Red Line sexy <G&gt
                      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                      Jeff


                      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                      Comment

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