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  • Brakes: Brake drum stud repair

    Ok, with all the on and off I did replacing my rear axle seals, I may have cross threaded a stud and according to a tire shop, I have one stripped and another almost so.

    How do you go about replacing studs on a brake drum, this is a newer car and it's different, but is the process the same? I can't imagine I need a whole new drum because I have a bad stud.

    brhttp://matrixowners.com/index.php?/t...um-brake-type/

  • #2
    What year & model are we talking about? Is it a tapered axle rear or flanged? Have you spoken to one of the vendors? If it's tapered then you most likely have the studs that are swedged (spelling?). They require a special tool to install. If it is a flanged axle then you can do it yourself by just smacking them inwards & install the new ones with a larger nut in between to draw it into position.
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    • #3
      Studs in late model Rotors as well as any brake drums (hub centric) are all (((pressed))) in and out The lugs bolts have a serrated section that gauls into the receiving metal and that's all it needs to stay in place. If you have a new lug, just put the old drum on your bench and use a ball peen hammer. Using a piece of softer metal ( brass/aluminum) use it to beat (tap) on will ease the chore.
      I have to agree with you that Costco tire-bots are very close to Neanderthal in their methods, ask me why I know that!!...
      64 GT Hawk (K7)
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      • #4
        It's a rear drum on my '60 Lark VI wagon, the 9" drums.

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        • #5
          Ah, you said a newer car...
          60 Lark rear drum has to be removed with the appropriate puller (a hub puller). The lug studs are swedged onto the face of the drum....meaning there's a small pinch of lug bolt material spread in front of the drum and holding it against the hub. You need a swedge remover or a good eye and a sharp file to remove the swedge, then tap or press the lug out. New lug should be swedged to the drum but since this is the only one being replaced, just leave it alone, once it's set in the hub. The drum won't fall off...
          64 GT Hawk (K7)
          1970 Avanti (R3)

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          • #6
            Good to know. So I would just go into NAPA and get a replacement stud? What about the step in the video where they direct you to bolt the new stud into the drum with a torque wrench? That seems like a sensible step to take.


            Originally posted by 64V-K7 View Post
            Ah, you said a newer car...
            60 Lark rear drum has to be removed with the appropriate puller (a hub puller). The lug studs are swedged onto the face of the drum....meaning there's a small pinch of lug bolt material spread in front of the drum and holding it against the hub. You need a swedge remover or a good eye and a sharp file to remove the swedge, then tap or press the lug out. New lug should be swedged to the drum but since this is the only one being replaced, just leave it alone, once it's set in the hub. The drum won't fall off...

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            • #7
              Yes, the new lug wil likely have those serrations at the shoulder to bite into the hub. Stick the threaded nose through the hub/drum, slap a 1/2" washer over it and use a lug nut to pull it through.
              64 GT Hawk (K7)
              1970 Avanti (R3)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 64V-K7 View Post
                Yes, the new lug wil likely have those serrations at the shoulder to bite into the hub. Stick the threaded nose through the hub/drum, slap a 1/2" washer over it and use a lug nut to pull it through.
                Thank you.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by LeoH View Post
                  Good to know. So I would just go into NAPA and get a replacement stud? What about the step in the video where they direct you to bolt the new stud into the drum with a torque wrench? That seems like a sensible step to take.
                  Are you going to file the swedge off, or find a machine shop with a swedge remover to remove it ?
                  South Lompoc Studebaker

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                  • #10
                    I use https://plus.google.com/photos/11667...05435250958898

                    This is the hole saw I have used to remove many swaged studs. Remove the swaging and press out the stud. I am in the process of making some more drum pullers so if you have the time, and the money for ten studs, then why not make your drums free from the hubs. I pressed out the ones for the black puller but the others I hit with a large ball peen hammer.

                    I use Volvo studs to replace the Studebaker studs but you might want original.

                    Len

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                    • #11
                      Remember that the left side of the car has left hand studs. Did the tire shop wreck them by over tightening them with an air wrench?
                      Last edited by RadioRoy; 03-13-2015, 10:53 AM.
                      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                        Remember that the left side of the car has left hand studs. Did the tire shop wreck them by over tightening them with an air wrench?
                        1958 was the last year that Studebaker used left hand threaded studs/nuts.

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                        • #13
                          words of wisdom, the home made tool in this thread is actually a hub puller, not drum puller, if you actually use a drum puller you run the risk of cracking the drum. also I recommend pressing out the lugs, smacking may also crack or warp drum. Take it to a mechanical shop after you pull the drum and have them press out and press the new lug in, most likely cost $50.00

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                          • #14
                            Warping or distorting a brake drum is very easy if removing or installing a wheel stud incorrectly. As the old saying goes..."ask me how I know"
                            Had to remove a brake drum and have it resurfaced on a brake lathe after replacing a stud.
                            My fault and I paid.
                            sigpic1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

                            "There's nothing stronger than the heart of a volunteer"
                            Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle
                            "I have a great memory for forgetting things" Number 1 son, Lee Chan

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jackster2014 View Post
                              words of wisdom, the home made tool in this thread is actually a hub puller, not drum puller, if you actually use a drum puller you run the risk of cracking the drum. also I recommend pressing out the lugs, smacking may also crack or warp drum. Take it to a mechanical shop after you pull the drum and have them press out and press the new lug in, most likely cost $50.00
                              Correct. Just a slip of the tongue. A "Hub Puller" is the correct name for the tool.

                              As the hub and drum are as one in it's configuration, if I'm pulling the hub I'm also pulling the drum with it, although with the tool it is pulling on the studs, which are swaged locking the hub and drum together, and pressing against the end of the axle. Page 3 of the workshop manual refers to the drum and hub as an assembly and they are removed as one.

                              If the swaging has been removed then the drum can be removed quite easily. I don't press out the studs until the drum is separated from the hub. Even the drums I run on the tapered axles have had the drums separated from the hubs. I still removed the drums for those after the swage removal and before I pressed out the studs.

                              As you can see in these photos I have the drums removed and the studs still remain. The drums were 10" six cylinder front and are now 10" V8 rear for a Moser flanged axle 44. https://plus.google.com/photos/11667...593?banner=pwa

                              The removal of the studs I was doing was not for reuse of the hub for anything else other than as a tool, so hitting them with a hammer is fine. Sorry if I was not clear about that.


                              Len

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