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My GM front Sway Bar installation

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  • Frame / Springs: My GM front Sway Bar installation

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    Last edited by 5brown1; 03-01-2015, 10:18 AM.

  • #2
    Very nicely done, complete with photos and listing of possible donors.

    For anyone fabricating his own brackets, consider mocking up the bar attached at the ends. It will then become obvious how the bracket can be fabricated by bending, making each side from a single long piece of steel and adding reinforcing straps across the open area. Use heavy cardboard to make the pattern.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      My only recommendation...would be to shorten the connection links (from the bar to the control arm) to get them and the anti-sway bar out of harms way. Junk laying on the freeway, chunks of tire, etc., with the links hanging so low may cause some havoc, you don't want. Also, same reasoning, put the nut on the upper end of the connection, less stuff hanging down.
      And yes, I agree with Jack. When I made mine, it was from a single piece of strap (steel) with just a single diagonal welded in to keep the bracket from moving back and forth (front to rear).

      Otherwise, nice work.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Yes, very nicely done...I'm wondering though, if in a really hard 'lean' that massive bar may 'overpower' the stock Studebaker pedestal brackets and bend (collapse) them....probably not, but that really is one 'powerful' sway bar!! Good luck!

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        • #5
          Thanks for the compliments.
          I did consider shortening the links more but looking at Sals54's drawing I could not tell how much to cut off.
          Can they be shortened too much?
          I will turn the bolts around, that was just the easiest way to get the bar attached prior to having the brackets ready.
          Sals54 has used a 1 5/16" bar with the same pedestal brackets for (IIRC) about 20 years and seems to love it.

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          • #6
            I just went to Bob Johnston's site looking up what he has on sway bars & every one I clicked on came up with the error 404 message. I hope it's something wrong on my end here & not with Bob's site. I tried looking for Sal's post here but the search came up empty.
            59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
            60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
            61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
            62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
            62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
            62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
            63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
            63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
            64 Zip Van
            66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
            66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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            • #7
              Looks nice! How does the car handle at the limit of adhesion?
              Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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              • #8
                I also searched Bob Johnstones website and couldn't find anything on sway bars so I sent him a PM telling him he can use my project if he wishes.
                I haven't driven the car yet but may this afternoon as it is supposed to get 44 degrees. I will not be "at the limit of adhesion". LOL

                Here is a link to the thread in which Sals54 participated and provided his drawings.

                http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...y+bar+question

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                • #9
                  One more thing that's fairly critical -

                  With that big bar on the front, if you don't have a rear bar...GET one and put it on the car.
                  If you do not, the handling will be unballanced. If you drive the car in the wet (rain), or occasuinally push it in corners (freeway on/off ramps), the car will over-steer, and may quickly come around on you.
                  Actually it will be unballanced all the time, but just won't show up under "normal" driving.

                  Just a little forewarning.

                  Mike

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                  • #10
                    I hate to disagree but I believe a very thick bar will tend toward pushing than looseness. (Front wheels losing traction before rear and plowing straight ahead). Generally it is a good idea for bars at both ends but driving the car will tell the tale. There are lots of cars and trucks out here with front bars and no rear bars.
                    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Mike,
                      With that big of a bar on the front and no rear bar, won't the car understeer not oversteer? With a 1 1/4"front bar the rear should be about 7/8" to balance the handling.
                      Bill

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                      • #12
                        Funny, 2x. Disagree all you like,

                        Wanna ride with me on a rainy day in my Lark with a big bar in front and no bar in the back, it's an easy thing to proove.............?

                        Mike

                        I know what it says in the manual..! I've been modifying suspensions a long time.
                        BUT, on that rainy day I mentioned (its raining now), with just the slightest flick of the steering wheel, while in a corner (freeway off ramp)...well, you might want to bring a change of shorts..!
                        Last edited by Mike Van Veghten; 03-02-2015, 08:40 AM.

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                        • #13
                          sals54

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
                            Funny, 2x. Disagree all you like,

                            Wanna ride with me on a rainy day in my Lark with a big bar in front and no bar in the back, it's an easy thing to proove.............?

                            Mike

                            I know what it says in the manual..! I've been modifying suspensions a long time.
                            BUT, on that rainy day I mentioned (its raining now), with just the slightest flick of the steering wheel, while in a corner (freeway off ramp)...well, you might want to bring a change of shorts..!
                            Apparently there are things at work in your car that make it behave differently than other cars. Could be many things, seized shock absorbers, improper tire pressure, broken frame, etc. ...too much application of power for traction available...?

                            The rules of suspension design are still that a thicker front bar will make the condition at the limit of traction understeer.
                            Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                            • #15
                              With heavy bar in front and none in the rear, my car has only come around on me once. It was raining, but that's only part of the story. I was entering the freeway on a cloverleaf onramp, when my throttle linkage broke. The sudden release of the throttle acted like a brake, which caused me to do a sudden 180. My instinct was to steer into it with more gas, but, alas, none was to be had and around I went. I'd entered many freeways under fairly heavy throttle without trouble prior to this occasion. That was, by the way, the last time I drove the car with stock carb linkage. I immediately changed to GM cable linkage. No more trouble after that, either with the carb, nor with handling. I can assure you the extra rubber out back does make a difference.
                              sals54

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