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  • #16
    Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
    George Demitsas still has the stainless tanks. It is not necessary to remove the tank or back seat to replace the fuel gauge sending unit. There is an access panel built into the rear bulkhead, behind the carpet.
    From what info I can find "Olympus Avanti" doesn't exist anymore, do you have direct contact info for George?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by karterfred88 View Post
      From what info I can find "Olympus Avanti" doesn't exist anymore, do you have direct contact info for George?
      George still has ads in the Avanti Magazine. 773 486-6026.

      Also new tanks are avaiable here. Scroll down.

      http://avantiparts.biz/accessories-3/
      Bob Langer
      Glenshaw,PA

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      • #18
        Definitely pull out the tank and get it cleaned and sealed. Some guys do it themselves, some get it done. I've had several tanks "boiled out" and then sealed with a teflon coating. Excellent results, and safe feelings about the effectiveness of the sealer. Bill

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        • #19
          Hawklover,

          Where did you get the new steel fuel lines for your Avanti? I want to replace mine also.

          Thanks

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          • #20
            I made my last 2 Avanti tanks.
            Just remove the ends of the tanks and the baffles and get a sheet metal worker to roll you a new skin.
            Weld together and seal the tank.
            There is obviously a bit more to it but if you're handy then it can be done. I think the first one cost about $160AUD to make and the other was about $250AUD and that included the sealer.
            It was the cheaper option than buying one in the US and shipping here.
            pb
            ps I changed the second tank to so I could run an intank fuel pump.

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            • #21
              Greetings to you in Virgina!......spent many moons in Fairfax!!
              As to the fuel lines.........I purchased two full coils of Cunifer lines from Jon Myer, one for the tank to fuel pump, the second from the glass bowl back to the tank (vent line). Cunifer is an amazing material an amalgam of copper and nickle Very easy to work with. Also replaced every rubber line with FI spec'd hose and FI clamps, overkill, but I like overkill!:-)
              Originally posted by studefan View Post
              Hawklover,

              Where did you get the new steel fuel lines for your Avanti? I want to replace mine also.

              Thanks

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Stan.Gundry View Post
                I agree that it needs to be thoroughly cleaned inside, whether by having a radiator shop boil it out, or soaking it for days with a super strong detergent solution followed by a solution that will dissolve rust, followed by filling it with gravel and rotating and shaking that around inside for an hour or so and then cleaning all of that out. Shaking the gravel around inside will break loose a lot of rust and crud that may still be left in there. The point is, there is more than one way to clean it out on the inside, but it must be cleaned out. Then, before you slosh the inside with some kind of fuel tank sealer/protectorant, on th outside solder a penny over every spot weld holding the interior baffles in place. The penny soldered in place gives an extra measure of strength and protection against rust through at the spot welds. I followed this procedure years ago, and it has held up over time even with the modern fuels.
                That 'soldered penny over the spot welds' is a good old 'trick' Stan.....Thanks for sharing

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                • #23
                  20 yrs ago Jon Myer told me about those pennies, I did as he said.........no more tank weeping!
                  Originally posted by Stan.Gundry View Post
                  I agree that it needs to be thoroughly cleaned inside, whether by having a radiator shop boil it out, or soaking it for days with a super strong detergent solution followed by a solution that will dissolve rust, followed by filling it with gravel and rotating and shaking that around inside for an hour or so and then cleaning all of that out. Shaking the gravel around inside will break loose a lot of rust and crud that may still be left in there. The point is, there is more than one way to clean it out on the inside, but it must be cleaned out. Then, before you slosh the inside with some kind of fuel tank sealer/protectorant, on th outside solder a penny over every spot weld holding the interior baffles in place. The penny soldered in place gives an extra measure of strength and protection against rust through at the spot welds. I followed this procedure years ago, and it has held up over time even with the modern fuels.

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                  • #24
                    Pennies!!! Avantis are at least worth silver soldering silver dimes!
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Here's a link to a 1963 Avanti gas tank on ebay right now.

                      http://www.ebay.com/itm/STUDEBAKER-A...#ht_128wt_1238

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                      • #26
                        Once again I must respond to a gas tank thread. GAS TANK RENU!!!
                        Find your nearest agent (GASTANKRENU.COM) and send your tank to them. The cold process treatments do not stay in place with the modern "alcohol" fuels due to the dramatic increase in their oxygen content. The cold process coatings were designed long before we had alcohol in our gasoline and the alcohol does really bad things to most of those coatings. In addition RENU agents can typically repair almost any extent of rust holes your tank may have (up to and including softball sized holes). And you won't need to solder pennies onto your tank. Their process results in a baked on PVC coating inside and out that they guarantee for the life of the owner. I have had several Avanti tanks done and they are the ultimate in reconditioned parts. No other process can match the finished quality of a Gas Tank RENU repair. I used to be their agent in AZ and even though I closed the operatiion due to low volume, I still swear by the process and send my tanks to other RENU agents to have them processed. I've seen the results of the cold process coatings and it ain't pretty. The coatings, when they start to release from the inside of the tank become floating contaminants and commence doing the very thing they are supposed to prevent.
                        Last edited by Kenmike2; 02-23-2015, 09:18 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Kenmike2 View Post
                          Once again I must respond to a gas tank thread. GAS TANK RENU!!!
                          Find your nearest agent (GASTANKRENU.COM) and send your tank to them. The cold process treatments do not stay in place with the modern "alcohol" fuels due to the dramatic increase in their oxygen content. The cold process coatings were designed long before we had alcohol in our gasoline and the alcohol does really bad things to most of those coatings. In addition RENU agents can typically repair almost any extent of rust holes your tank may have (up to and including softball sized holes). And you won't need to solder pennies onto your tank. Their process results in a baked on PVC coating inside and out that they guarantee for the life of the owner. I have had several Avanti tanks done and they are the ultimate in reconditioned parts. No other process can match the finished quality of a Gas Tank RENU repair. I used to be their agent in AZ and even though I closed the operatiion due to low volume, I still swear by the process and send my tanks to other RENU agents to have them processed. I've seen the results of the cold process coatings and it ain't pretty. The coatings, when they start to release from the inside of the tank become floating contaminants and commence doing the very thing they are supposed to prevent.
                          What is the typical cost of the RENU process?

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                          • #28
                            I removed the tank about ten days ago and it doesn't look too bad on the inside. It doesn't have much crud in it but does have a rust-like dust on the inside. I took it to a fellow who restores older cars and he also thought the tank looked good. He suggested taking it to a radiator shop to have it dipped and cleaned but they won't touch them anymore.The shop suggested using strong detergent then muriactic acid to treat the inside. Does anyone have any experience using the acid as far as mixing it with water, ie. the proportions, and will it affect the galvanized coating on the metal? Oh by the way, that tank stinks to high heaven and there was still about a quart in it when I took the tank out

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                            • #29
                              Go to a NAPA store and buy a POR-15 fuel tank kit, about $80.00. Works like a charm...
                              64 GT Hawk (K7)
                              1970 Avanti (R3)

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