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  • Fuel System: Avanti Fuel Tank

    I am finally beginning to bring back my 63 Avanti to life after a 44 year sleep. I wanted to inspect the fuel tank using a digital inspection camera (bore scope) and see if there are any issues with rust or debris in the bottom of the tank. Has anyone attempted this and can it be done ? Are there baffles that would cause a problem? I took off the gas cap yesterday and there is still an odor of stale gas in the tank.I can take the bottom hose off and make sure there is no liquid in there.

  • #2
    I just went through this with an 8 year old slumber and a half tank of old gas... The cheapest and most cost effective thing to do is remove the tank and treat it with a POR-15 tank sealing kit (~$80.00) Look at it this way... You have to replace the rubber lines anyway and chances are the sender is toasted from the condensation .... Getting the tank out is not a difficult process.
    64 GT Hawk (K7)
    1970 Avanti (R3)

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    • #3
      Well that makes sense. I was under the impression that it was a real pain to remove the tank.

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      • #4
        Yes, the Avanti tank has 2 baffles in them, so it's sectioned in about 1/3 s. Often the lower elbow where the hose outlet attaches gets plugged from varnish. You take the hose off, and nothing comes out, so you think it's empty. Then you have to remove this elbow to get the tank out and stale gas goes everywhere.
        Bez Auto Alchemy
        573-318-8948
        http://bezautoalchemy.com


        "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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        • #5
          I guess I might be able to run a brass welding rod through the elbow to open it up.

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          • #6
            I did my gas tank with Por-15 products as Mr. Johnstone states above in Post #2.

            it was fairly easy to get the tank out thru the back seat area. easier if you have a power screwdriver to get all the screws out to get to it. once loose, i angled the tank to drain most of the gas below the bellows thru the bottom hose and was able to get her out to drain what was left.

            if you don't have a "Service Manual" - get one!
            Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

            '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

            '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

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            • #7
              I do have the service manual I bought in 1979. I was just thinking that I should read up on removing the tank. Thanks for the advice guys.

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              • #8
                The two tanks I've pulled would not come out until the 90 deg fitting on the bottom was removed. That's the gas shower Brad referred to in his post. It's a 1/4" NPT so it will screw out.

                Bob

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                • #9
                  Three years ago I had the tank in my 76 pulled, cleaned and coated at a radiator shop I use. He also went over the outside of the tank soldering every spot weld for the baffles. Along with replacing the the entire fuel lines has eliminated any gas odors inside the cabin and there have been no issues with sediment in the carburetor.
                  sigpic[SIGPIC]

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                  • #10
                    I need to clean the inside of my 50 Champion gas tank. I'm surprised that the fine red rust can get through my large clear fuel filter. The car sat for most of it's 20 years since it was restored, until I bought it 10 months ago and started driving it.

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                    • #11
                      After 50 years, this past November I replaced all the steel fuel line in my "64..........this included all the rubber hoses, except the one hose that goes up to the sail panel as a vent. Guess in 50 years from now if cars still exist the next owner can change that one out.

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                      • #12
                        I would recommend saving yourself potential hassles down the road... take it out now, have it "boiled" out, look for pin-holes etc. See what you actually have, then decide what to do about it. All the best!!!

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                        • #13
                          I agree that it needs to be thoroughly cleaned inside, whether by having a radiator shop boil it out, or soaking it for days with a super strong detergent solution followed by a solution that will dissolve rust, followed by filling it with gravel and rotating and shaking that around inside for an hour or so and then cleaning all of that out. Shaking the gravel around inside will break loose a lot of rust and crud that may still be left in there. The point is, there is more than one way to clean it out on the inside, but it must be cleaned out. Then, before you slosh the inside with some kind of fuel tank sealer/protectorant, on th outside solder a penny over every spot weld holding the interior baffles in place. The penny soldered in place gives an extra measure of strength and protection against rust through at the spot welds. I followed this procedure years ago, and it has held up over time even with the modern fuels.
                          Stan Gundry
                          www.AvantiPublishing.com

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                          • #14
                            Looking through the various threads on the Avanti gas tank, I found out there is no longer a non-CASO method for tank replacement. At one time there was a vendor supplying stainless steel reproductions, but it seems they have disappeared. Has anyone, with an Avanti, found a company who already has the specs of the Avanti tank and can reproduce it in stainless? With all the alcohol in todays fuel, and it looks like it isn't going away any time soon, it seems like the best, if not the least expensive method, would be to replace all the fuel line and hoses with resistant materials that will last for our lifetime at least. Taking out the bazillion screws holding the panel behind the seatback in, is a chore-especially when they snap off and then there is the "resealing" of it which rarely gets done. My tank was resealed with some type of sealer, but now I can hear some stuff moving around when I tap the empty tank, so I know it needs to come back out. And the gage sender never gets to full, so if I have to take it out, I'd like to make the whole process the last time I'll need to do it.

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                            • #15
                              George Dimitsas still has the stainless tanks. It is not necessary to remove the tank or back seat to replace the fuel gauge sending unit. There is an access panel built into the rear bulkhead, behind the carpet.
                              Last edited by bezhawk; 02-20-2015, 04:29 PM.
                              Bez Auto Alchemy
                              573-318-8948
                              http://bezautoalchemy.com


                              "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                              Comment

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