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  • Paint: Painting 101

    Anything is possible.....

    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

  • #2
    Hey...if his name is "Adam"...you can say he is "Adamizing" that paint!

    Sure reminds me of a friend's dad "back in the day." Ol' Jake would do anything to make/save a buck. On his used car lot...Too cheap to buy Armor-all, he would slather sugar water on old tires to make them shine. He stuffed worn engines with his secret mixture of "engine honey," and always kept an extra key, 'cause he also ran his own "re-possession" service.

    Thanks for posting this. I've actually done something similar, but by just blowing into my "air-brush" when doing a small model job and not wanting to hook up the air compressor. Good old American ingenuity.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

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    • #3
      Looks like a 100 point restoration to me!!

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      • #4
        Well at least He's not breathing in anything,at least part of the time.really is a big world with a lot going on
        Joseph R. Zeiger

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        • #5
          My brother-in-law ,also quite thrifty ,painted his 49 p.u. with a fly sprayer or a flit gun! Doofus

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          • #6
            My Dad has told be a couple of times that he painted a couple of cars with paint gun and his mother's Kirby vacuum cleaner...never knew if he was pulling my leg or not. cheers, junior
            sigpic
            1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by junior View Post
              My Dad has told be a couple of times that he painted a couple of cars with paint gun and his mother's Kirby vacuum cleaner...never knew if he was pulling my leg or not. cheers, junior
              No, he was not pulling your leg. As in..."there's nothing new..." what he was referring to was actually the first HVLP spray. HVLP refers to High Volume (atomizing) Air, and Low (Fluid) Pressure. It was an innovative method of expanding the use of vacuum cleaners, boosting sales back then.

              Later, with all the environmental concerns, the focus was on limiting VOC emissions, improving transfer efficiency, reducing waste, and a more economic process.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #8
                Back in the day I've seen cars painted with a powder puff (lots of orange peel) and I once saw one which had been painted with a straw broom. Serious brush marks.

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                • #9
                  First car I "Helped" paint was a early Ford coupe. My first cousin and a neighbor and myself painted it with Black Flag fly sprayers.

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                  • #10
                    Heck I guess I wasted my money on a compressor last summer.

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                    • #11
                      Well...after all...we are talking about "Air-Atomizers." And, to be serious for a moment, here is a little (uncredited) historical blurb I have stolen off another website.

                      It was in 1888 when Toledo, Ohio physician Dr. Allen DeVilbiss combined a bulb, some tubing, and the base of an oil can to create the first atomizer for health care.

                      In 1907, Thomas DeVilbiss, an inventor in his own right, experimented with adapting the original atomizer to create a spray gun to meet the challenges of spray finishing. Mass production was beginning to evolve at this time and Thomas DeVilbiss' spray gun technology proved to be a revolutionary addition to the paint and lacquer coating applications on the furniture and automotive finishing assembly line. Spraying the lacquer reduced drying time to hours instead of weeks and the spraying of paint replaced hand brushing, helping to create new jobs and increase productivity in manufacturing.


                      So, all these devices use the early principle of a technology from over a century ago. As for the fly sprayers...I have a similar dry sprayer for atomizing seven dust in the garden. The big drawback for mine is that you need to wear heavy work gloves when spraying with it. The friction of the piston causes the tin cylinder to heat up pretty quick and it gets too hot to hold with a bare hand.
                      John Clary
                      Greer, SC

                      SDC member since 1975

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jbjr View Post
                        Heck I guess I wasted my money on a compressor last summer.
                        Certainly not, as long as you bought one with enough CFM capability, and plumed it with appropriate filtration and moisture separator.
                        John Clary
                        Greer, SC

                        SDC member since 1975

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