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Sleeving or Boring OS 1557668 Disc Brake Rear Wheel Cylinders: SS or Brass? Who?

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  • Brakes: Sleeving or Boring OS 1557668 Disc Brake Rear Wheel Cylinders: SS or Brass? Who?

    $88 is just too much for OE.

    Apple Hydraulics does brass for $50 however I think SS would be better.

    What what are people doing? What material? Who is reputable? or low cost?

    OR

    Are there any other cylinders than can be fabbed in without too much effort? I borrowed the old car CarQuest spec catalog with all the pics of all the cylinders and tried to find something that was close. While not a 100% thorough investigation, I did not find any.

    Still, there may be something that will fit without too much effort.

    Another thought is to bore them out to the next over size (4-jaw chuck in lathe - no problem) there are +1/32 and +1/16 bores available so the cups area available. The pistons are another matter - and the boots. Could make sleeves for the OE pistons. Aftermarket pistons DO NOT have the snaps for the boot - they are unusable.

    Interesting to here what people are doing and what works.
    Thanks
    Tom
    Last edited by tomhoo; 02-08-2015, 05:46 PM.

  • #2
    I'm trying to remember which but I think my calipers on the #1 Avanti were sleeved by Dave T-bow in stainless & the rear cylinders on the Hawk were done in brass by White Post in Virginia. I think that's what I did.
    59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
    60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
    61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
    62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
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    62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
    63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
    63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
    64 Zip Van
    66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
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    • #3
      They're not available from ordinary parts places anymore? I'd have thought you could walk into Napa as an example and get them....quite possibly off the shelf.
      Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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      • #4
        I tried the stainless route, and nearly lost my truck for it... They were not Dave's tho....

        I ended up scavenging till I found a set..... then rebuilt them and ended up rebuilding the entire system and going to DOT-5 fluid..

        Much better, not as much tendency to lock up after sitting.

        Comment


        • #5
          Back in the early 90's, I had a bunch of cylinders sleeved in stainless by a fellow somewhere in New England. Apparently he did not seal the sleeve to the cast iron cylinder body. The brake fluid leaked past the sleeves and onto the brake lining. Having a rear wheel lock up in the mountains of the California gold country almost cost me my car and maybe my life. Definitely a brown pants moment. If I ever meet this fellow in person, I will discuss this procedural flaw with him.

          I had to remove at least 8 wheel cylinders and at least two master cylinders from the cars that had them installed.
          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
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          • #6
            Well, this is not quite what I wanted to hear.

            I had DOT5 Silicone fluid in my car for something like 25 years and while there was no deep pitting, the surface finish on the calipers and wheel cylinders was unlike anything I ever saw - the surface looked like a "Dalmation" with black spots all over the place.

            I guess a real problem with a press fit is the fact that you are dealing with hydraulic pressure which is over 1000 psi. And this is further complicated when everything gets hot and you lose fit.

            Boring them out might be the best way to do it. If there is too much rear brake action, there is always an adjustable proportioning valve that the dirt track racers use. (Actually, Wilwood 260-8420 Lever Style Proportioning Valve has a 6-position detented lever to select specific proportions which would be AWESOME for trucks since empty they are seriously prone to rear wheel lockup.)

            I did spend some time with my Carquest Old Parts Application Catalog and there are about (7) 3/4" bore wheel cylinders that could possibly be adaptable. If the big hole in the backing plate was the same size, you could simply drill some other small holes for the mounting screws. In fact, some of them have (4) screws which might align.

            Spray welding would be interesting.

            Furnace brazing sleeves would be the ultimate.

            You would think that China could produce these for 1/10th the cost...

            Comment


            • #7
              Check the availability of 13/16" pistons, cups, and boots for those cylinders. They were in the past and probably still are. Bore the cylinders to 13/16". I doubt if you'll need a proportioning valve. I didn't for an Avanti with Turner front disks.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Warren Webb View Post
                I'm trying to remember which but I think my calipers on the #1 Avanti were sleeved by Dave T-bow in stainless & the rear cylinders on the Hawk were done in brass by White Post in Virginia. I think that's what I did.
                A long time ago I had all the wheel cylinders and the master cylinder from my '53 sleeved in brass at White Post. Their instructions said to NOT use silicone brake fluid. I thought that was silly and used silicone fluid. Guess what, they were right. Wheel cylinders leaked.
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                • #9
                  Maybe it's a false memory, but I seem to recall there was a Toyota wheel cylinder that fit. For me it was just easier-for the moment-to buy the *!!* overpriced supplier ones and bite the bullet. Bolts right in, you can use the DOT5 if you want to and it's over with. For the long term I'm going to convert the whole rear axle assembly to a Ford Explorer 8.8 with disc brakes, which solves many other cost problems at the same time.By the time you sleeve them or adapt something else that only costs $25.00 each you've spent more time and money than the savings, if any, is worth.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by karterfred88 View Post
                    Maybe it's a false memory, but I seem to recall there was a Toyota wheel cylinder that fit. For me it was just easier-for the moment-to buy the *!!* overpriced supplier ones and bite the bullet. Bolts right in, you can use the DOT5 if you want to and it's over with. For the long term I'm going to convert the whole rear axle assembly to a Ford Explorer 8.8 with disc brakes, which solves many other cost problems at the same time.By the time you sleeve them or adapt something else that only costs $25.00 each you've spent more time and money than the savings, if any, is worth.
                    I remember a Toyota replacement (calipers) for the front disc brakes, not for the rear drums on disc brake cars.
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tomhoo View Post
                      $88 is just too much for OE.

                      Apple Hydraulics does brass for $50 however I think SS would be better.

                      What what are people doing? What material? Who is reputable? or low cost?

                      OR

                      Are there any other cylinders than can be fabbed in without too much effort? I borrowed the old car CarQuest spec catalog with all the pics of all the cylinders and tried to find something that was close. While not a 100% thorough investigation, I did not find any.

                      Still, there may be something that will fit without too much effort.

                      Another thought is to bore them out to the next over size (4-jaw chuck in lathe - no problem) there are +1/32 and +1/16 bores available so the cups area available. The pistons are another matter - and the boots. Could make sleeves for the OE pistons. Aftermarket pistons DO NOT have the snaps for the boot - they are unusable.

                      Interesting to here what people are doing and what works.
                      Thanks
                      Tom
                      I think you should shop around a little more, I believe these cylinders can be bought for around $70.00 to $75.00 new. Now let's look at a couple things when considering sleeving/rebuilding:

                      1. $100.00 to sleeve
                      2. $30.00 shipping/insurance/handling; cylinders to/from sleever
                      3. $30.00 for 2 kits including shipping/insurance/handling
                      = $160.00car
                      4. I've had to remove lots of these sleeved units due to leaking. You run the risk of them leaking and losing your car and maybe even your life.

                      New cylinders:

                      1. $140.00 2 new cylinders
                      2. $12.95 Shipping
                      3. $3.95 Insurance
                      =$156.90

                      So, where are you really saving anything?
                      Bo

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                      • #12
                        Hint-------Contact Bo for new cylinders
                        Milt

                        1947 Champion (owned since 1967)
                        1961 Hawk 4-speed
                        1967 Avanti
                        1961 Lark 2 door
                        1988 Avanti Convertible

                        Member of SDC since 1973

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                        • #13
                          While stainless steel *sounds* good, many of those sleeves are too thin to get a good, solid press fit, so they sometimes leak. Brass or bronze sleeves are usually thicker, and are soft enough to press in and be leakproof. And they last virtually forever. There are specialists like White Post, but any decent machine shop, auto or general, should be able to rebore and press in yellow metal sleeves.

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                          • #14
                            The Toyota parts are 2.25 dia vs 2.125 dia. However this will work ok if you replace all 4.
                            David L

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 64Avanti View Post
                              The Toyota parts are 2.25 dia vs 2.125 dia. However this will work ok if you replace all 4.
                              This will also reduce pedal pressure applied enough to notice, so if the stock brakes require a lot of pressure this is a good idea. In general with the better (much) traction available with modern tires increasing the bore is a good idea as a more powerful braking action can be used with the extra traction.
                              Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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