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  • Steering: Lower outer bushings

    Can the lower outer A-arm bushings be replaced without removing the A-arm from the car?

  • #2
    Short answer, yes. but it's involved. you need to seperate the lower support from the king pin. keeping steering knuckle( spindle) tied up on king pin, this prevents shims from getting out of place also needle bearing in steering knuckle,there caged but... when removing king pin from support leave big nut on king pin with a few threads between top of nut and bottom of support. bump bottom of king pin with brass hammer till it seperates slightly. parts are keyed together and must come apart squarely, 2 large screw drivers work well to "wedge" them apart. with knuckle tied securely up on pin pry under upper control to raise assy out of lower support. you start this mechanical circus by placing your floor jack directly under coil spring and supporting cars weight. once parts are seperated, raise upper arm and wedge a wooden block under upper control for support. it all sounds easy but you will do some head scratching, work slowly and think through each step. Good Luck doofus

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    • #3
      Originally posted by doofus View Post
      Short answer, yes. but it's involved. you need to seperate the lower support from the king pin. keeping steering knuckle( spindle) tied up on king pin, this prevents shims from getting out of place also needle bearing in steering knuckle,there caged but... when removing king pin from support leave big nut on king pin with a few threads between top of nut and bottom of support. bump bottom of king pin with brass hammer till it seperates slightly. parts are keyed together and must come apart squarely, 2 large screw drivers work well to "wedge" them apart. with knuckle tied securely up on pin pry under upper control to raise assy out of lower support. you start this mechanical circus by placing your floor jack directly under coil spring and supporting cars weight. once parts are seperated, raise upper arm and wedge a wooden block under upper control for support. it all sounds easy but you will do some head scratching, work slowly and think through each step. Good Luck doofus
      Thanks for the reply, but I was thinking more like just backing off the threaded outer bushings - one at a time - and threading on new ones. One of the lower bushings will not take grease. Using higher pressure results in grease oozing out from behind the grease fitting and around the bushing.

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      • #4
        You could take a fine pin punch and try to move the ball in the zerk. Sometimes they will rust freeze.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the advice. I've replaced the zerk, but the results are still the same: no grease getting to the threads of the bushing. I even tried one of those "grease fitting rejuvenators," but without success.

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          • #6
            Take the nipple off the grease gun and thread it directly into the bushing. I can't leak then, and you can exert much more pressure
            Also try heat to soften the old grease.
            Bez Auto Alchemy
            573-318-8948
            http://bezautoalchemy.com


            "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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            • #7
              Bez nailed it! or remove one bushing at a time and clean then pack with fresh grease. much simpler and you can inspect pin and bushing for wear. Good One Bez! luck Doofus

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              • #8
                I used a 10 ton porta power pump and pumped hydraulic oil into plugged zercs.Then greased them, had to remove a few but eventualy got them all greased, my Stude had been parked awhile.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by doofus View Post
                  Bez nailed it! or remove one bushing at a time and clean then pack with fresh grease. much simpler and you can inspect pin and bushing for wear. Good One Bez! luck Doofus
                  So I CAN remove one bushing at a time. What problems will I encounter when doing that? Thanks.

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                  • #10
                    I like the advice from Doofus. Inspect them!

                    Who knows how long they have gone without grease? Maybe they were greased, but did it penetrate the threads where it is needed? You should have a look at one of my threads if you want to see what happens when the outer pins go without grease for an extended time...

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                    • #11
                      Just remove the zirks and run a wire through to clean out the hardened grease, put new zerks in and retry.

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                      • #12
                        Alan, that wont remove the hardened grease in the threads. Doofus

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                        • #13
                          Just take a propane or map gas torch and warm it up a little. That should take care of the grease in the threads.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by doofus View Post
                            Short answer, yes. but it's involved. you need to seperate the lower support from the king pin. keeping steering knuckle( spindle) tied up on king pin, this prevents shims from getting out of place also needle bearing in steering knuckle,there caged but... when removing king pin from support leave big nut on king pin with a few threads between top of nut and bottom of support. bump bottom of king pin with brass hammer till it seperates slightly. parts are keyed together and must come apart squarely, 2 large screw drivers work well to "wedge" them apart. with knuckle tied securely up on pin pry under upper control to raise assy out of lower support. you start this mechanical circus by placing your floor jack directly under coil spring and supporting cars weight. once parts are seperated, raise upper arm and wedge a wooden block under upper control for support. it all sounds easy but you will do some head scratching, work slowly and think through each step. Good Luck doofus
                            I agree, this is the best way to do it. This is not a good place to take short cuts; the cap & pin threads will need a thorough cleaning, and to re-install them correctly, you'll probably need the spreader called for in the Shop Manual. If you do not have a Shop Manual, I'd get one before tackling the job. JMHO.

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                            • #15
                              Great idea Alan, and just in time too. the 56 wagon wont take grease hi or lo propane time! Doofus

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