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Bias versus Radial tires

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  • #31
    Whitewalls and raised white lettering tires have the white rubber compound encapsulated in the sidewall of the tire. It is not an add on but an integral part of the sidewall. A special co-extruder is used to produce the whitewall sidewall. The white rubber has a covering of black rubber over it. After the tire is cured in the proper mold a special grinder grinds off the covering of black rubber over the white to produce the whitewall or expose the raised white lettering.

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    • #32
      Back in the '70s I was selling tires. I was given a tour of a tire plant and they showed us that most tires were given a white stripe during the production stage as StudegaryB said above. I saw the grinding procedure where the white stripe was exposed. Back then you had a choice of b/w or w/w with a couple more dollars for the w/w.

      I doubt if many tires are manufactured with the stripe now as few w/w tires are being offered.
      Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Michael J Hawk View Post
        I would just like to know why the wider the white wall, the more expensive the tire. Cokers are like 250.00 a pop. That's more than double the cost of one with a narrower stripe.
        Well I am sure one main reason is, the Wide Whites are in Limited Production, not mass produced like the narrow Whites, have been. They too are getting made in smaller quantities now, but when sold by Major Tire Co's. not Speciality Tire Co's. they are still affordable.

        I would not go to Coker for narrow whites, when you can get higher quality ones from Cooper and many others, just not quite as "period correct" with '60's Brand and Model names.

        Also per Post #31 & 32, less Black Rubber would have to removed on a Narrow White, less labor.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #34
          Originally posted by StudegaryB View Post
          Whitewalls and raised white lettering tires have the white rubber compound encapsulated in the sidewall of the tire. It is not an add on but an integral part of the sidewall. A special co-extruder is used to produce the whitewall sidewall. The white rubber has a covering of black rubber over it. After the tire is cured in the proper mold a special grinder grinds off the covering of black rubber over the white to produce the whitewall or expose the raised white lettering.
          Which explains all the numerous youtube videos demonstrating how you can make your own wide whitewalls by grinding off the black sidewall coating on most tires.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by LeoH View Post
            Which explains all the numerous youtube videos demonstrating how you can make your own wide whitewalls by grinding off the black sidewall coating on most tires.
            Don't ever try this!!! The co-extrusion process puts the white rubber in position for the original usage. You have no way of knowing if there is a broader expanse of white rubber under the black cover. Also the sidewalls perform structurally in the tire dynamics and are very important. Atlering the tire sidewall could get yourself and your loved ones killed and would void any warantee the tire has.

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            • #36
              StudegaryB,
              I too was in tire industry (distribution, not manufacture) and was the Armstrong distributor in western Canada - I had a set of Miracle Extra Traction tires(37x14.50x16.5)on my 8600 lb 1969 Suburban 4x4 that lasted 17 years with total off road abuse. A truly amazing product. Certainly the ride quality was not what we have now but using nylon in the construction sure made them tough.
              Bill

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              • #37
                Originally posted by StudegaryB View Post
                Don't ever try this!!! The co-extrusion process puts the white rubber in position for the original usage. You have no way of knowing if there is a broader expanse of white rubber under the black cover. Also the sidewalls perform structurally in the tire dynamics and are very important. Atlering the tire sidewall could get yourself and your loved ones killed and would void any warantee the tire has.
                Back in the late '70s/early '80s there was actually a franchise being sold called "Tire Cosmotology". To become a tire cosmotologist you bought a machine that spun the wheel on the car and ground off black to achieve the width of whitewall desired.
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Buzzard View Post
                  StudegaryB,
                  I too was in tire industry (distribution, not manufacture) and was the Armstrong distributor in western Canada - I had a set of Miracle Extra Traction tires(37x14.50x16.5)on my 8600 lb 1969 Suburban 4x4 that lasted 17 years with total off road abuse. A truly amazing product. Certainly the ride quality was not what we have now but using nylon in the construction sure made them tough.
                  Bill
                  During that period Armstrongs off road light truck tires were know to be the preferred tire for off roaders. Nylon was a very good ply fabric with one failing. Nylon bonded into the rubber compounds very well but it would flat spot. After driving, having the tires warmed up, then parking, the tires would take a set when they cooled off. Next time you drove the tires would be thumping for 5 miles until they warmed up again. Polyester became the preferred ply fabric because it performed well in tires without taking a cold set and didn't flat spot.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by 53k View Post
                    Back in the late '70s/early '80s there was actually a franchise being sold called "Tire Cosmotology". To become a tire cosmotologist you bought a machine that spun the wheel on the car and ground off black to achieve the width of whitewall desired.
                    That is a truly scary practice. A tire engineer designs the sidewall profile to work properly and have the right thicknesses in the original whitewall configuration. Weakening up a sidewall by gringing away some thickness would make the tire unbalanced side to side, the tire would flex more, produce more heat, and fail.

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                    • #40
                      Back in 1963 my Dad had a set of Michelin X radials installed on his new '64 Daytona wagon by the dealer even before he picked the car up. The dealer had the tires selected and installed by a tire shop. The tire shop had never installed Michelin X's on a Stude so they contacted Michelin and had the factory recommend the proper size. The factory also sent a set of steering alignment specs for his car. They were NOT the same as the Studebaker factory specs. Since I was given all my Dad's old paperwork I might be able to find the data that he was given back in 1963. Otherwise I am sure the proper alignment specs for radial tires on our Studes should be out there somewhere.

                      I don't know how many times I remember hearing gas station attendants (remember them?) ask him or my Mom if they wanted to have the Studebaker's tires aired up!

                      BTW, I have heard rumors that part of the DOT inspection procedure for all cars will be limiting tires to a MAXIMUM age of 5 years.

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