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  • #31
    hey all, I have a full drive train out of a 57 hawk (289-225 hp) from radiator to rear end. I can send video of engine running. 3 sp overdrive, 4.56 posi rear. I'll take $2000 for the works and throw in hill holder, master cylinder, steering box and drive shaft. I couldn't resist the free 500 caddy eng and trans to put in it. I'm in Eastern Oregon.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by chrise2 View Post
      /Cut/I couldn't resist the free 500 caddy eng and trans to put in it. I'm in Eastern Oregon.
      I am sorry to hear that Chrise.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #33
        [QUOTE=chrise2;884795]I couldn't resist the free 500 caddy eng and trans to put in it. [QUOTE]
        Congrats Chris. Good choice. What year 500? The ground pounder '70, or the low compression '76?
        Jerry Forrester
        Forrester's Chrome
        Douglasville, Georgia

        See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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        • #34
          I am guessing the Caddy motor has a TH400 behind it? With that setup, I bet your Hawk will pass everything but a gas station

          I met a guy about 22 years ago with a 62GT Hawk that he had put a Caddy 429 in. He told me he had tried everything he could think of to cool it down, but was unsuccessful. Later, he told everyone what a great setup it was, so maybe he got the bugs ironed out.

          I also met a guy with an Avanti, Joe Granatelli had put a Caddy 429(?) in, and he could not cool it down either.

          I cannot imagine why it would be such a pain to cool the Caddy motor in a Stude, especially a Hawk, with the excellent flow to the radiator. Hope you have good luck with yours.

          The TH400 is a great tranny, but you probably already know that

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          • #35
            Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
            I am guessing the Caddy motor has a TH400 behind it? With that setup, I bet your Hawk will pass everything but a gas station

            I met a guy about 22 years ago with a 62GT Hawk that he had put a Caddy 429 in. He told me he had tried everything he could think of to cool it down, but was unsuccessful. Later, he told everyone what a great setup it was, so maybe he got the bugs ironed out.

            I also met a guy with an Avanti, Joe Granatelli had put a Caddy 429(?) in, and he could not cool it down either.

            I cannot imagine why it would be such a pain to cool the Caddy motor in a Stude, especially a Hawk, with the excellent flow to the radiator. Hope you have good luck with yours.

            The TH400 is a great tranny, but you probably already know that
            I have a 700R4 behind the '79 Caddy 425CI in my '82-3-4-5-6-90 Chevy-GMC-Cadillac 2500 dump truck. All it takes is a Trans-Dapt adapter plate. I put the truck together from a lot of different vehicles. <G>

            Jerry Forrester
            Forrester's Chrome
            Douglasville, Georgia

            See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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            • #36
              Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
              I am guessing the Caddy motor has a TH400 behind it? With that setup, I bet your Hawk will pass everything but a gas station

              I met a guy about 22 years ago with a 62GT Hawk that he had put a Caddy 429 in. He told me he had tried everything he could think of to cool it down, but was unsuccessful. Later, he told everyone what a great setup it was, so maybe he got the bugs ironed out.

              I also met a guy with an Avanti, Joe Granatelli had put a Caddy 429(?) in, and he could not cool it down either.

              I cannot imagine why it would be such a pain to cool the Caddy motor in a Stude, especially a Hawk, with the excellent flow to the radiator. Hope you have good luck with yours.

              The TH400 is a great tranny, but you probably already know that
              Except for my schooling in the Air Force, where I worked on diesel, air cooled gasoline engines, turbine engines, and water cooled engines, I have never called myself a "mechanic." Returning from Vietnam, I went to college, and majored in psychology (of all things). Then, I somehow spent a long career in industrial sales, and engaging in many projects requiring engineering and mechanical skills. Unlike many of you, I am not a numbers guy. I have to touch, feel, apply, mock-up, and get dirty to achieve my mechanical and engineering goals. So far, I have managed pretty well.

              That said, for years, I have attended large gatherings of automotive events. At many of these gatherings, there are often beautiful modified contraptions that look great in their parking spaces, but can't make it down the highway without running hot. As we have discussed often, the coolant passages of some of our Studebaker engines tend to suffer from an accumulation of casting sand, and residual debris from the foundry. In addition, rust, corrosion, and mineral deposits, over time, can add to a cooling system loosing efficiency. This can be overcome with a thorough cleaning.

              Properly done, all cooling systems are engineered to optimize coolant flow and air flow. After-all, what is any cooling system but a "heat exchanger?" If you have a great radiator, properly sized, a fan with appropriate pitch/rpm...and fail in the ability to intake and exhaust the air...it won't work. If you have good airflow, undersized radiator, or constricted water flow....well...you get the picture. I've seen similar problems with spray booths, home heating systems, and, of course, many cars. Especially modified vintage cars, where insufficient radiators are used. To me, often, it is not the radiator itself, but the huge engine crammed into a small engine bay with little attention given to how that big power plant, dams up the air, restricting air flow, and compromising efficiency of air flow (heat exchange).

              All components of a cooling system need to be in good order. It is as simple as that. Wrong gasket on a water pump can cause impeller clearance gap to be too big. This reduces water flow (gpm), and as many of us have discovered, adding an air conditioner to an old car, slapping the after-cooler in front of an already marginal radiator, is asking for trouble.

              I'm kicking around the idea of installing a Studebaker V8 in my truck. I've gathered parts, including a couple of V8 truck radiators. If the project gets beyond the "planning" stage...I sure hope to get the cooling right. Wish me luck.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

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              • #37
                I'm kicking around the idea of installing a Studebaker V8 in my truck. I've gathered parts, including a couple of V8 truck radiators. If the project gets beyond the "planning" stage...I sure hope to get the cooling right. Wish me luck
                Studebaker got the cooling right on the V8 trucks. I've never had one in good condition overheat even when pulling a load. All you need to do is use the stock V8 truck parts and make sure your block and radiator interiors are clean before installation.

                jack vines
                PackardV8

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                • #38
                  Cooling won't be a problem I think. I put in a double row aluminum and so far it is fine. Had to weld on a couple of brackets and build an air dam for the top, but looks and works fine. It has the TH-400 but I scored on a 4L60E that I may put in it if I don't put it in the 67 Avanti. I expect more trouble keeping the trans temp down and will add an oil cooler and thermostatic fan. experience tells me it should work ok.

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                  • #39
                    [QUOTE=Jerry Forrester;884808][QUOTE=chrise2;884795]I couldn't resist the free 500 caddy eng and trans to put in it.
                    Congrats Chris. Good choice. What year 500? The ground pounder '70, or the low compression '76?
                    It's a 74, low compression but still gobs of torque. The old 289 was only 8.5

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