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Project A: Sleeving Rear Drum Cylinder

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  • Project A: Sleeving Rear Drum Cylinder

    Ok,
    now for the sleeving. There have been about 5 messages on this over
    the past 8 years. but none in the past 4.

    1. what is preferred, brass or stainless steel.
    2. who are the vendors, and WHO DO YOU TRUST.
    3. what are their prices, I find that most do not tell you on their web
    pages.

    thanks!

    Terry,
    1963 Avanti R2, 63SR1065 http://sterkel.org/avanti
    1985 Kubota L2202 (Diesel)
    2000 VW Jetta GLS

  • #2
    White Post Restorations in Northern Virginia will do the sleeving, but it IS pricey.


    Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

    Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

    Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
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    • #3
      They're not the only ones but they're certainly the ones who've been advertizing the service the longest! I remember their ads in Hemmings back in the 70s![:0]

      Miscreant adrift in
      the BerStuda Triangle!!

      1957 Transtar 1/2ton
      1960 Larkvertible V8
      1958 Provincial wagon
      1953 Commander coupe
      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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      • #4
        I have sleeved slave cylinders in the past in my shop and have always used nonmagnetic stainless. I quit doing it for the public because of the liability factor and because I haven't had a request in a long time. The reason for stainless is, brass will corrode if you happen to get moisture in the lines. Neal

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        • #5
          Never sleeved a wheel cylinder, never felt the need since new ones are cheaper then sleeving. Disk brakes yes, but not wheel cylinders.


          Studebaker On The Net
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          Arnold Md.
          65 Sports Sedan(sold)
          64 Daytona HT
          63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
          63 GT Hawk
          63 Avanti R1/AC
          63 Avanti R2/4 speed
          63 Daytona HT
          63 Lark 2 dr.
          62 Lark 2 door
          62 GT(parts car)
          60 Lark convert
          60 Hawk
          57 Silver Hawk
          52 Starliner(sold)
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          50 Champion (sold)
          JDP Maryland

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          • #6
            I've sleeved both wheel cylinders, masters and even slave cylinders. I used all stainless. How bad is your cylinder? Does it need to be bored out first? The ones on my M-series were so bad I had to bore them out a lot to get past the pits.

            Jake

            -Home of John Studebaker-
            http://community.webshots.com/user/Stude4x4

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            • #7
              I was interested in purchasing stainless sleeved wheel cylinders from White Post. I believe I talked to the owner at a huge swap meet. He was very curt, and advised that they didn't use stainless, but refused to talk to me even though he was not busy. He implied that they used brass now, but seemed very evasive. To make a long story short, I would not purchase anything from this man.

              Since their price is almost twice the price of a new one, I settled on new ones - but I still run regular brake fluid. I presume if I change it regularly, there is no corrosion problem.

              If stainless would stop the corrosion problems, he would have had a sale. I am debating switching to silicone, but its hard on stoplight switches - however, I understand that there is a interchangeable Harley stoplight switch that is not affected by silicone. 12 volt only?

              I am interested in having safe brakes - ones that I can rely upon even if the car is stored for a while. I'm open to suggestions too.

              Paul R

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              • #8
                Paul; you are right about buying new wheel cylinders, there is NO reason to re-sleeve them when new ones are available, even if they cost the same. I would go to the silicone, especially in a cold, wet area where there is lots of condensation. The stop light switch problem is not that big a deal. You can convert your car to a simple plunger switch like other makes in the 70's use, and make a bracket to mount it. If you have a '61 & up Lark type or Avanti it is easy to do, right above the pedal. If you are asking will the Harley switch work as it is 6V, or it is 12V & yours is 6V, it should not matter, switches do not know the difference.

                quote:Originally posted by 55s


                Since their price is almost twice the price of a new one, I settled on new ones - but I still run regular brake fluid. I presume if I change it regularly, there is no corrosion problem.
                I am debating switching to silicone, but its hard on stoplight switches - however, I understand that there is a interchangeable Harley stoplight switch that is not affected by silicone. 12 volt only?I am interested in having safe brakes - ones that I can rely upon even if the car is stored for a while. I'm open to suggestions too.
                Paul R
                StudeRich
                Studebakers Northwest
                Ferndale, WA
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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