Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

what is best rubber lubricant for the vent window shafts in a hardtop Hawk?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Body: what is best rubber lubricant for the vent window shafts in a hardtop Hawk?

    hi, finally getting my door/vent/quarter glass components redone and will be reassembling for my '57 Golden Hawk.

    I had to buy and rivet in NOS pot-metal pivot shafts for the bottom of the stainless vent-window frames (and seems these are ALWAYS broken!), and thought it MIGHT help save mine from breaking by having a decent, long-lasting lubricant on that shaft before forcing it through that tight rubber hole in the vent frame seal.

    Was thinking of engine-lubricant (the white lithium?) that you use when reassembling pistons/rings, etc.... Any suggestions for something better and non-harmful to the rubber over time (and won't dry out and make the situation WORSE?) Maybe 'nothing' is the best..... Don't know.

    (and WHY in the world did Studebaker ever make a load-bearing shaft like that out of POT-METAL? I know they were scrounging for pennies, but the engineers must have had convulsions when told they couldn't use steel for those long skinny shafts, knowing how much pressure they had to take when people force the vent windows open and close......)

  • #2
    Not too sure, but what about a silicone based lubricant like used in plumbing applications? cheers, junior
    sigpic
    1954 C5 Hamilton car.

    Comment


    • #3
      NAPA RuGlyde (spelling ? ) It has always been the best I could find on rubber, suspension, tire beads, and the like.

      Comment


      • #4
        I broke both NOS pivot pins (or should I say the glass shop guys did when putting in the new glass in the frames) and noted the pot metal casting had air bubbles in it making the weak metal even weaker.

        Not wanting to fix this ever again, I made my own shafts from steel rod. I had access to a mill and have a welder and grinder so I cloned the shafts from steel as best I could and they have been in the car since. It would take a lot of force to bust them again!

        I just put the white lithium grease on the plastic bushing inside the door that is tightened with the band clamp. One thing you can do is drill a hole in the door inner steel frame so you can tweak the band clamp screw for tightness after the window frame installed. Otherwise its not accessable w/o pulling everything apart.

        Jeff in ND

        Comment


        • #5
          Take a look at303 Products 30350 Aerospace Protectant. It's a great lube for rubber, vinyl, leather, etc. It'l even dress up your tires.

          Dick

          Dick
          Mountain Home, AR
          http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker2.htm

          Comment


          • #6
            Being an old Electron Beam Welder, I use Dow Corning High Vacuum Grease on those rubber parts. Once you rub some of that stuff in the rubber will never rot.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
              I broke both NOS pivot pins (or should I say the glass shop guys did when putting in the new glass in the frames) and noted the pot metal casting had air bubbles in it making the weak metal even weaker.

              Not wanting to fix this ever again, I made my own shafts from steel rod. I had access to a mill and have a welder and grinder so I cloned the shafts from steel as best I could and they have been in the car since. It would take a lot of force to bust them again!

              I just put the white lithium grease on the plastic bushing inside the door that is tightened with the band clamp. One thing you can do is drill a hole in the door inner steel frame so you can tweak the band clamp screw for tightness after the window frame installed. Otherwise its not accessable w/o pulling everything apart.
              Darn, Jeff, thought I was the only one who ever thought of drilling the hole in the door. That makes it a snap to adjust the clamping screw. I just use silicone spray to lube that nylon bushing, and it has never caused a problem.

              Another trick, when installing vent window seals, is to use a razor and slit the inboard side of the seal hole, which the vent window pivot pin passes through. That way, the seal slips around the pin easily, and no reason to remove the vent window to install the seal.

              Comment


              • #8
                I use Kroil on just about everything now. I like the way it penetrates & stays on parts you need lubed.
                59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                64 Zip Van
                66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                66 Cruiser V-8 auto

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Alan View Post
                  Being an old Electron Beam Welder, I use Dow Corning High Vacuum Grease on those rubber parts. Once you rub some of that stuff in the rubber will never rot.
                  Haven't thought about that stuff since I stopped working on Varian ion implanters, back in 1981. We used to like the brown stuff in the orange tube made in France better than the silicone base clear grease. The specs said the vapor pressure was better.
                  Last edited by RadioRoy; 08-24-2014, 09:02 PM.
                  RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                  17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                  10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                  10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                  4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                  5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                  56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                  60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks guys, good input. The NAPA stuff I could find; where would one find Dow "high vacuum grease"? Sounds like speciality supply store material.......?? I don't suppose it is the same as good old Vasoline petroleum jelly, or close enough? That or the white lithium for motor rebuilding 'start-up' lube was my first choice, without recommendations of alternatives.

                    For the record, I'm looking to lubricate the RUBBER, where the pot metal shaft goes through; not the nylon bushing.
                    THAT will get lubed too, but figure any good grease or lube will be fine on the nylon. I just don't want to break down the rubber with some chemical in a lube and they ALL have different stuff in them nowdays, some compatible with rubber, and some I'd bet pretty bad with rubber....
                    Originally posted by Alan View Post
                    Being an old Electron Beam Welder, I use Dow Corning High Vacuum Grease on those rubber parts. Once you rub some of that stuff in the rubber will never rot.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Silicone based grease will not hurt the rubber, but it's death to any kind of a re-paint job. It seems like only a molecule of it will keep fresh paint from sticking.

                      The vacuum grease is truly a specialty item, but you might google it.

                      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dow-Corning-...533192&vxp=mtr
                      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Rubber Rejuvenator is used by printers to clean and revitalize rollers and platens.
                        Available from several manufacturers.
                        South Lompoc Studebaker

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X