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Clearance tolerance?

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  • Engine: Clearance tolerance?

    In the main and rod bearings my Chilton book calls for .0015 oil clearance. I suppose this is the minimum on assembly? How much is still good allowing for wear?
    Last edited by t walgamuth; 08-22-2014, 05:32 PM.
    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

  • #2
    Which engine?

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    • #3
      64 259 full flow.
      Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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      • #4
        In the main and rod bearings my Chilton book calls for .0015 oil clearance.
        All the interesting stuff you do and you're using Chilton as your engine building reference? C'mon, spring for a copy of the Studebaker Shop Manual - .0005"-.0025" mains and .0005"-.002" on the rods.

        FWIW, an engine worn to the upper limits is going to have lower hot oil pressure than I like to see.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          It's interesting to me that Chilton's survived and MOTORS did not. MOTORS is the best by far, IMO and Chilton's is riddled with mistakes. Although the older Chilton's had lots of cool short cut tips.
          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

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          • #6
            As Jack says, the Stude "book" sounds like the one to follow.
            Though .0005" sounds a "tad" too tight, the .0025"/.002" is more higher rpm, race clearance.

            While all above will work, something in the .0015 to .002" (rod and main) range sounds great to me.
            And as Jack notes, looser clearances will give slightly lower oil pressure shown on the gage, but it' should only be a couple of pounds, nothing to worry about.

            Mike

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
              All the interesting stuff you do and you're using Chilton as your engine building reference? C'mon, spring for a copy of the Studebaker Shop Manual - .0005"-.0025" mains and .0005"-.002" on the rods.

              FWIW, an engine worn to the upper limits is going to have lower hot oil pressure than I like to see.

              jack vines
              You callin' me a CASO? Guilty.

              Actually I am just trying to sell some parts and wanted to figure out how worn they are. For actual rebuilding and such I rely on my best friend who owns the best automotive machine shop around these parts.
              Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
                As Jack says, the Stude "book" sounds like the one to follow.
                Though .0005" sounds a "tad" too tight, the .0025"/.002" is more higher rpm, race clearance.

                While all above will work, something in the .0015 to .002" (rod and main) range sounds great to me.
                And as Jack notes, looser clearances will give slightly lower oil pressure shown on the gage, but it' should only be a couple of pounds, nothing to worry about.

                Mike
                Thanks Mike. Although overly simplified perhaps the Chilton's was right in the middle of the tolerances I see being bandied around here, if I understand it correctly.
                Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                • #9
                  I only make this a point because my high school shop instructor always did (and so in Mr. Pohl's honor):

                  Clearance is the designed (intentional) difference between parts.

                  Tolerance is the difference between ideal and acceptable.
                  '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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                  • #10
                    You know now that you mention it I believe I did hear that in shop class too!
                    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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