Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

door adjustment

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • door adjustment

    Hi, Does anybody have a good set of directions for adjusting a door on my 61 Lark four door (Front driver's door)? Thanks.

    David G. Nittler
    David G. Nittler

  • #2
    I expect the shop manual will have something to say about it.

    First: are the hinges in good shape? If there is slack or slop on the hinge pins, the door will sag, and any adjustment will simply cover up the problem, for a while.

    Assuming the hinges are good:
    1. The hinges are fastened to fixed points in the door pillar; no adjustment is possible there. All adjustment is achieved by adjusting the placement of the door on the hinge leaves. There is quite a bit of up/down or forward/back movement allowed by the sliding nut plates that attach the hinges to the door; just loosen the hinge screws, and shift the door a little. Of course, loosening thse hinge screws can be quite a chore sometimes.

    2. The above takes care of moving the door around on its own plane within the opening. If your problem is that it sits "in" or "out" on one side or corner relative to the adjacent body panels, that is taken care of by adding/removing shims under the hinges, or by shifting the latch striker on the door pillar. When closed, the door is held to the body at three points, the two hinges and the latch striker. Any adjustment made to one of those three points will cause the door panel to pivot about a line joining the other two. (Try levelling a 3-legged stool with cardboard under one leg to visualize what's going on.)

    Say the bottom front corner of the door is too far "in" related to the fender. First, if the door fit is otherwise perfect, you might need to shift the fender in a bit. Assuming, though, that the problem is in the fit of the door, you would install a small shim between the lower hinge and the door. You will also have to correct the way that the door hangs within the opening, even if you marked the hinge's location on the door. That shim will move the front lower corner of the door out, but it will also move the rear upper corner in. That can be taken care of by simply bending the door; body shops do it all the time. In this case, it can be done by simply bracing your knee against the rear lower corner of the slightly-opened door, and tugging on the top corner by hand. Use repeated trials and progressively greater force until you get it right. It does not take a great deal of strength!

    If the whole procedure sounds like too much work, I'd suggest you simply do the following: remove the interior door panel, loosen and re-tighten the hinge-to-door screws, and then take the car to your favorite body shop, and have an old hand do the adjustment for you. Talk to a shop or two beforehand, and find somebody who will work with you.

    Freeing up the possibly rusted hinge screws can EASILY be the most time-consuming part of the job; search threads here on that topic for hints. If the body shop has to do that, you are going to pay body shop rates for it. Nuff said.

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #3
      Gord's response is very good. I will also mention that if your Lark is rusty, like at the base of the A and/or B pillars, forget about adjusting the door until the body structure is repaired. The door latch should be used to hold the door shut and not to force an alignment. I like to adjust doors with the latch plate removed and then place the latch plate on the car to retain the door at the correct distance in.

      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer
      Gary L.
      Wappinger, NY

      SDC member since 1968
      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

      Comment

      Working...
      X