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  • Engine: V8 Intake manifold gaskets

    Hi:

    With the warm weather back, it's STUDEBAKER time again. Last year I was having some heat soak problems with the edelbrock 1403 in the Hawk. I got the Mr. Gasket 98 Laminated gasket for the carb. I'd also like to block off the exhaust crossover in the intake manifold. I read there is a ready made gasket set that does this, who stocks it?

    Thanks
    1964 Gran turismo Hawk
    1954 Packard Pacific

  • #2
    Originally posted by erik64 View Post
    Hi:

    With the warm weather back, it's STUDEBAKER time again. Last year I was having some heat soak problems with the edelbrock 1403 in the Hawk. I got the Mr. Gasket 98 Laminated gasket for the carb. I'd also like to block off the exhaust crossover in the intake manifold. I read there is a ready made gasket set that does this, who stocks it?

    Thanks
    Phil Harris at Fairborn Studebaker has them. I just bought 2 sets .
    Bill H
    Daytona Beach
    SDC member since 1970
    Owner of The Skeeter Hawk .

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    • #3
      I have seen those gaskets at SB. Looks like a good idea, but they're made of fiber material. Wonder how long they last before blowing through?

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      • #4
        I used the Edelbrock #8723 gasket and removed the heat riser valve. That plus no ethanol gas seems to have solved the problem without replacing the intake manifold gaskets with the blocking type.

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        • #5
          The manifold gasket with the small opening is listed for an R2 - I have used an original metal one and it seems to make no difference to the hard starting hot......

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          • #6
            Even with a composite intake gasket that is 'blocked off' on the heat crossover, you still need to protect the gasket from burn through.

            I make a pair of small thin stainless steel heat deflector plates that fit between the composite gasket and the head to protect the intake gasket.
            Sell them in an intake installation 'kit' complete with a pair of composite gaskets, a heat insulated 'stacked & stapled' AFB carb gasket, a set of stainless steel studs/nuts/washers to mount the carb...

            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
              Even with a composite intake gasket that is 'blocked off' on the heat crossover, you still need to protect the gasket from burn through.

              I make a pair of small thin stainless steel heat deflector plates that fit between the composite gasket and the head to protect the intake gasket.
              Sell them in an intake installation 'kit' complete with a pair of composite gaskets, a heat insulated 'stacked & stapled' AFB carb gasket, a set of stainless steel studs/nuts/washers to mount the carb...

              That looks like a well thought out kit, Jeff. Set up that way, it'd probably last as long as OEM gaskets, and could be ran year round. Unless the person lived in Alaska.

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              • #8
                Thanks Guys:

                I tried a lot of things already. Electric fuel pump, Edelbrock 1403. Replaced the prestolite distributor with a delco obtained from one of our vendors. Did this so I could install a pertronix igniter. Anyway, the vacuum advance was bad on the prestolite. I checked the cooling system with the Harbor Freight Thermometer (Nice gizmo, by the way!!). The only things I haven't tried yet are ethanol free gas (Unobtainable in my area, heard shell might have it but no shell in area). I have the mr gasket 98 but haven't installed this laminated carb insulator yet. Nice kit Jeff! This is what I was what I was asking about. I'll be contacting you offline about it.

                My hawk isn't as bad as some I've read. It doesn't stall out on the road and not restart. But it will not restart hot, unless I depress the gas pedal to the floor. I assume this is a flooding condition? Not good for the cylinders. anyway thanks for the help especially Jeff's kit. I heard it was out there, but didn't know what it looked like (Nice Picture)

                Thanks Warren
                1964 Gran turismo Hawk
                1954 Packard Pacific

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by erik64 View Post
                  Thanks Guys:

                  The only things I haven't tried yet are ethanol free gas (Unobtainable in my area, heard shell might have it but no shell in area).

                  Thanks Warren
                  I would be very surprised if Shell carried ethanol-free gas in your area, even if you could find a Shell station. The entire NYC metropolitan area is an EPA air quality noncompliance area, and oxygenated fuel is required.
                  Skip Lackie

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by erik64 View Post
                    Thanks Guys:

                    I tried a lot of things already. Electric fuel pump, Edelbrock 1403. Replaced the prestolite distributor with a delco obtained from one of our vendors. Did this so I could install a pertronix igniter. Anyway, the vacuum advance was bad on the prestolite. I checked the cooling system with the Harbor Freight Thermometer (Nice gizmo, by the way!!). The only things I haven't tried yet are ethanol free gas (Unobtainable in my area, heard shell might have it but no shell in area). I have the mr gasket 98 but haven't installed this laminated carb insulator yet. Nice kit Jeff! This is what I was what I was asking about. I'll be contacting you offline about it.

                    My hawk isn't as bad as some I've read. It doesn't stall out on the road and not restart. But it will not restart hot, unless I depress the gas pedal to the floor. I assume this is a flooding condition? Not good for the cylinders. anyway thanks for the help especially Jeff's kit. I heard it was out there, but didn't know what it looked like (Nice Picture)

                    Thanks Warren
                    I know exactly what you are talking about with the hot restart. The electric choke makes the problem even worse. It only needs to be shut off 15-20 minutes for the rheostat to cool off enough to close the choke. Then you are trying to restart a flooded engine, on full choke. Pushing the gas pedal to the floor forces the choke to open 1/4 inch or so, and with enough cranking, the motor will eventually restart. With a manual choke, at least you can be sure the choke is open for the hot restart.

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                    • #11
                      Hey that's a great idea, with the electric choke, Joe. I never thought of that. I'll open it on the next hot start, and see what happens.

                      Thanks Warren
                      1964 Gran turismo Hawk
                      1954 Packard Pacific

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by erik64 View Post
                        Hey that's a great idea, with the electric choke, Joe. I never thought of that. I'll open it on the next hot start, and see what happens.

                        Thanks Warren
                        You are already opening the choke about 1/4 of the way, when you hold the pedal to the floor. The mechanical linkage over-rides the choke spring to partially open it. Still, with manual choke you have total control, i.e. can keep it all the way open for hot restarts.

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                        • #13
                          My dad taught me at a young age to remove the air cleaner lid on our 64 Daytona six cylinder and hold the choke open with a screwdriver so it would start for my mom in his absence.

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                          • #14
                            If the choke is not fully open when the engine is hot then it needs to be adjusted. Holding your foot down is supposed to open the choke when the engine is flooded.
                            59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                            60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                            61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                            62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                            62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                            62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                            63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                            63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                            64 Zip Van
                            66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                            66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Warren Webb View Post
                              If the choke is not fully open when the engine is hot then it needs to be adjusted. Holding your foot down is supposed to open the choke when the engine is flooded.
                              The heated coil (heated electrically or with hot exhaust gases), located on the carb, cools faster than the exhaust crossover, which continues to percolate the carb. The result is, while the motor is still hot and percolating the carb and flooding the intake, 15-30 minutes after shutdown, the choke will close. This condition only becomes worse if the carb is kept cooler, with such things as phenolic spacers and aluminum shields.

                              If you doubt the above, the next time your Stude cranks & cranks during a hot restart, stop cranking and pop the breather and look at the choke. A screwdriver handle works good to prop it open, while you are at it.

                              The only way to "adjust" this condition away, would be to set the choke super lean, but then it would hardly do its job during cold starts.

                              GM style, divorced coil operated chokes do not have the problem, since the heated coil is located on the crossover. A possible solution for Stude drivers would be to install a divorced choke. I tried several times to come up with a way to do that, but it woulda been too much trouble and beyond my skill set. I bet Jeff R. could do it with his eyes closed though
                              Last edited by JoeHall; 05-21-2014, 09:00 PM.

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