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Rear U-Joint by way of Pinion Seal Replacement 62 GT Hawk

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  • Drive Shaft: Rear U-Joint by way of Pinion Seal Replacement 62 GT Hawk

    Need your Help / Advice

    There are welded tabs that are broken on the rear two bearing caps that are the ones captured by the C-Clamp to the yoke. I can find no corresponding weld points.

    1) Front U-Joint has a grease fitting and rear does not?
    2) Rear U-Joint has a previously cut welded tab on the 2 bearing caps that are captured by the c-clamp. What are these welded tabs?
    Thoughts,
    Jim
    Last edited by Studebaker1962; 03-15-2014, 01:28 PM.
    Studebaker1962

  • #2
    Originally posted by Studebaker1962 View Post
    Need your Help / Advice

    There are welded tabs that are broken on the rear two bearing caps that are the ones captured by the C-Clamp to the yoke. I can find no corresponding weld points on the yoke.

    1) Front U-Joint has a grease fitting and rear does not?
    2) Rear U-Joint has a previously cut welded tab on the 2 bearing caps that are captured by the c-clamp. What are these welded tabs?
    Thoughts,
    Jim
    Your rear u-joint has never been replaced. It's the one it left South Bend with. Original factory u-joints didn't have a grease fitting. Most aftermarket u-joints do. The light metal strap was used to hold the caps together for the original assembly to the car. The strap had no function once the rear u-joint was bolted in. I still occasionally see an original rear u-joint even after all these years.

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    • #3
      Jim by this statement: "and no spinning under the clips." I am pretty sure that means that your Car has the Spicer Type "U" Joints with the external "C" Clip, Bearing Cup retainers. This would be correct for a 1962, and they are readily available.

      That rear one with no grease fitting has got to be pretty old, but if the mileage is low enough, and the maintenance good enough, it COULD still be useable. Many times we toss parts "just because". So either saving them or replacing them COULD work.
      Don't call me if you blow one down the road though!

      The welded straps were a handy thing when removing the Driveshaft to keep the Bearing Cups and Needles together and not dumping needles all over the ground or road. But as Jerry said, they are not critical.
      Last edited by StudeRich; 03-15-2014, 03:40 PM.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner
      SDC Member Since 1967

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      • #4
        Hi Rich,

        Thanks for the insight. I am an old MGB guy and the U-Joint needle bearings on those cars would seize and then the caps would spin under the retainer clip. Not the case in this GT Hawk. No movement. My question is only the 2 bearings under the U-Clamps at the rear joint.

        So, Not broke don't fix it?

        Maybe just add a little bearing grease in the 2 bearing caps under the rear C-Clamps and then re-assemble?

        Should I go all the way and replace the rear U-Joint with a U-Joint that has a grease fitting?

        Jim
        Last edited by Studebaker1962; 03-15-2014, 04:21 PM.
        Studebaker1962

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        • #5
          I would thoroughly clean the U-joint as best possible. Then lightly smear some lube in there and re-assemble. Make sure there is no galling or obvious discoloration on the needles or cap....hopefully AutoZone has one for you in your trunk for emergency.

          Comment


          • #6
            As long as you have it out, why not just replace it. Your's has been spinning for 50+ years so I'd just put it in now.

            Find out the size you need and by the best one you can find from a local drive train specialty company. They're a couple of bucks more but the good ones are still really good. That's how I buy the ones for my cars, that way it's new and the grease is the new and you can maintain it that way.

            Bob

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            • #7
              I almost never replace a KNOWN GOOD used part with a new one. NEW stands for 'Never Ever Worked' (stolen from Sam Memmelo of Shade Tree Mechanic fame and a personal friend and neighbor. With the quality of new parts now a days, I trust original parts more.

              Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
              As long as you have it out, why not just replace it. Your's has been spinning for 50+ years so I'd just put it in now.

              Find out the size you need and by the best one you can find from a local drive train specialty company. They're a couple of bucks more but the good ones are still really good. That's how I buy the ones for my cars, that way it's new and the grease is the new and you can maintain it that way.

              Bob
              Jerry Forrester
              Forrester's Chrome
              Douglasville, Georgia

              See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
                I almost never replace a KNOWN GOOD used part with a new one. NEW stands for 'Never Ever Worked' (stolen from Sam Memmelo of Shade Tree Mechanic fame and a personal friend and neighbor. With the quality of new parts now a days, I trust original parts more.
                We'll differ on this one when it comes to drive train parts. If it has spun for 50 years (bearings, u-joints, seals, etc) I'm replacing 'em. I won't argue about old vs new quality in many cases but my 71 YO eyes are having trouble defining "KNOWN GOOD" in the old stuff. I still have a few local vendors that handle top notch stuff, if available, will be the key phrase.

                Bob

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
                  NEW stands for 'Never Ever Worked' (stolen from Sam Memmelo of Shade Tree Mechanic fame and a personal friend and neighbor.
                  Wow! Two great quotes in two days. You are on fire, Jerry. I might steal that one, too.
                  RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.


                  10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                  4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                  5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon

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                  • #10
                    I will carefully double check the condition of the needle bearings, put a small smear of fresh grease and call it good. My Ford Explorer has 200k and no grease fittings on the drive shaft. My only goal was to change the pinion seal which leaks like a sieve. So when they stop leaking you know you need to fix it or just add more oil.....

                    If I pull the drive shaft to do the rear u-joint, then might as well do the front u-joint then might as well replace the seal at the back of the transmission then why not do the clutch. If you look for problems you will find them.

                    After typing this I am just doing the pinion seal today.

                    I have been meaning to buy an infrared temperature measurement device. I think this would be a good application for relative U-Joint readings, front to back and to my Ford as a comparison.
                    Last edited by Studebaker1962; 03-17-2014, 03:11 AM.
                    Studebaker1962

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