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starter solenoid

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  • Electrical: starter solenoid

    The starter solenoid on the '40 clicks and buzzes but won't energize the starter. There is power (6.5 volts)on the battery side. When I ground the center post I have power to the starter side using a test light. Using a 12 volt battery just on the starter will turn over the engine beautifully but hooking up the 6 volt system creates nothing but buzzin' and clickin'. This solenoid is on the firewall I have another that is mounted to a starter but am unsure if it is 12 or 6 volt. Any suggestions? Can I further test the solenoid to find out if it is good or toasted. As always all your help is appreciated.

  • #2
    May be as simple as a corroded cable connection.
    sigpic
    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

    Comment


    • #3
      An undercharged 6 Volt battery? Smaller than 00 Batt. Cables? Aren't all 6 Cyl. Solenoids mounted on the Starter? Make sure it has a good Ground. Last resort, a weak Starter.

      You say it has Power to the Starter side when closed, so it must be working.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

      Comment


      • #4
        I think a few voltage drop tests while cranking would answer some important questions about the condition of the starter circuit.
        - is the battery charged, and in good condition
        - are the battery terminal connections making good contact?
        - Are the battery cable undersized or damaged?
        - Is the solenoid in good working order?
        - Does the starter have an internal problem?
        - Is the starter properly grounded to the block?

        It would take a heap of parts swappin' to answer even a few of those questions, and parts swappin' would //never// answer some of them.

        Basic test here -
        http://www.freeasestudyguides.com/vo...drop-test.html

        More detailed one here -
        http://www.maniacelectricmotors.com/chstsycivote.html

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        • #5
          Since you say the solenoid buzzes when you try to start on 6 volts. It sounds to me that when you try to start on 6 volts the solenoid pulls in resulting in a voltage drop to the battery side of the solenoid which in turn causes the solenoid to disengage.
          Once it disengages the voltage increases to 6 volts and the solenoid engages again. The action keeps repeating itself; resulting in the buzzing sound.
          What wrong is another question. All the items that Ted mentioned could be a cause. You can check the voltage between the positive battery terminal and the battery side of the starter solenoid and or the starter side of the solenoid while trying to start the car.
          Or you could take a good jumper cable and connect from the battery negative terminal to the starter side of the solenoid to see if the starter turns over the motor.
          Let us know the results and we can then come up with other ideas
          Ron

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rstrasser View Post
            Since you say the solenoid buzzes when you try to start on 6 volts. It sounds to me that when you try to start on 6 volts the solenoid pulls in resulting in a voltage drop to the battery side of the solenoid which in turn causes the solenoid to disengage.
            Once it disengages the voltage increases to 6 volts and the solenoid engages again. The action keeps repeating itself; resulting in the buzzing sound.
            What wrong is another question. All the items that Ted mentioned could be a cause. You can check the voltage between the positive battery terminal and the battery side of the starter solenoid and or the starter side of the solenoid while trying to start the car.
            Or you could take a good jumper cable and connect from the battery negative terminal to the starter side of the solenoid to see if the starter turns over the motor.
            Let us know the results and we can then come up with other ideas
            Ron
            I by passed the battery cables using jumper cables and ran an extra ground from the solenoid to the positive ground on the battery same results. I tried another solenoid unsure if it was 12 or 6 volt it produced a much weaker click. The battery is from 2006 and the best I can charge it is to 6.8 volts. Maybe under load the battery can not maintain voltage. I'll charge the battery and try again. I do appreciate all the input.

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            • #7
              I think you are going to need a Battery. At 7 YEARS, that one is way past it's service life!
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by studeluvr View Post
                The starter solenoid on the '40 clicks and buzzes but won't energize the starter. There is power (6.5 volts)on the battery side. When I ground the center post I have power to the starter side using a test light. Using a 12 volt battery just on the starter will turn over the engine beautifully but hooking up the 6 volt system creates nothing but buzzin' and clickin'. This solenoid is on the firewall I have another that is mounted to a starter but am unsure if it is 12 or 6 volt. Any suggestions? Can I further test the solenoid to find out if it is good or toasted. As always all your help is appreciated.
                If You drive Your '40 quite a bit....instead of investing in archaic 6 Volt parts.....this may be a good time to convert to a modern, dependable 12 Volt electrical system!....really a simple job on Your year Studebaker

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                  I think you are going to need a Battery. At 7 YEARS, that one is way past it's service life!
                  I put a volt meter on the battery and yep its junk. I can charge it to 6.8 volts but as soon as it has any draw at all it drops to less than one volt. I also realized that upon cleaning and painting I insulated my ground from body to engine and frame. Progress is two steps forward one step back. Thanks a lot for the help from everyone. I will go over the list of possible issues anyway to save grief in the future.

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                  • #10
                    I'll research the 12 volt system idea since I have such a small amount of change over to worry about. For less than the cost of a six volt alternator I could switch to 12 volt as I have plenty of 12 volt alternators on the shelf to choose from. Just don't tell my spouse she wants everything stock she'll never know the difference.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by studeluvr View Post
                      I'll research the 12 volt system idea since I have such a small amount of change over to worry about. For less than the cost of a six volt alternator I could switch to 12 volt as I have plenty of 12 volt alternators on the shelf to choose from. Just don't tell my spouse she wants everything stock she'll never know the difference.
                      Sorry.....but Your Spouse is BOUND to know the difference when Your '40 begins starting without having to fight with it....and when the car has headlights that actually let You SEE something at night! Good luck

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                      • #12
                        One thing I didn't see mentioned was to install a Ford style starter relay, although I assume that a 40 has a full voltage floor switch to engage the starter not an ignition key switch. The starter relay has great benefit where a circuit goes thru the ignition switch, with potential for lots of voltage drop. Bad contacts in the starter switch and coil can cause problems as well.
                        Norm

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