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1963 avanti r2 purchase

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  • Other: 1963 avanti r2 purchase

    im not sure if im posting this in the wrong section but, I have found a 1963 Studebaker Avanti r2 around the neighborhood I live in and I am very interested I making him an offer. I have got in touch with the owner and he said he might be willing to sell this car. he claims he is the original owner and bought it back in 1963. I am 22 and it is a project that I am willing to take on myself over a course of time seeing as I am buying this car for myself to keep for a long time. I realize I will spend a lot more on this car than id ever get back. I am just wondering if I can maybe get a estimate of what I should offer to purchase this car for. sorry I don't have much info or any pictures. this will be my very first Studebaker and I am very determined to get this car and join the clubClick image for larger version

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  • #2
    Before anyone can give you a decent figure, you need to get under the car and check out the frame and torque boxes (aka "hog troughs"). If they're bad, about all you have is a parts car unless willing to repair them which isn't cheap. Also...is the exterior chrome present and what condition? Original wheels? Automatic or 4-speed? Interior condition?

    Lots of things need known. It may well be the basis of a fine restoration or a money pit of unimaginable magnitude. If you can get photos of the entire car...interior, exterior, underneath and under the hood it will go a long way towards coming up with a reasonable asking price. The serial number would help as well as far as determining if some items or original or retrofitted.

    Avantis are worth owning and restoring but one needs to be educated on them first...that can help keep you from spending too much and getting buried financially.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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    • #3
      Welcome

      The most important things to look at are under the car. The frame and steel boxes that stiffen the body and tie it to the frame (hog Troughs) should be in good shape or will add significant cost to the build. Hog troughs are $1500/pr and $3000 or so to install. The frame can usually be repaired but it pays to pull the body off of the frame to do it.

      Others parts missing - bumpers can be very expensive and hard to find. The interior, if repair is necessary, will cost about what any other car will. A paint job probably starts at $5000 and goes up to whatever you want to pay.

      The engine and blower are a bit pricey to rebuild and you need to find someone to do the rebuild that either knows what to do or can read a manual carefully.

      You'll find that if you farm out the work, it's much cheaper to buy a fully rebuilt/restored one.

      Now, with that out of the way, if you do your own work and want the pride of doing it yourself, I'd say you are looking at a few thousand dollars depending on the frame and hog trough needs. The suspension is fairly straight forward and a complete rebuild is about $1000.

      Going for true stock will still require a fair amount of outlay if you do it yourself. Doing a modified version, my area, can be handled at a lower cost.

      You'll get a ton of info with this post so pay attention and however you go, you will have one of the best looking rides in town.

      Again Welcome and keep asking. Bob

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      • #4
        thank you both for your replies now I know what kinds of things to look for. I will be scheduling a breakfast with this guy one of these days and talk with him about it. I will post all the details and get a much better look at it and let you guys know the condition.

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        • #5
          Look at the underside and also determine if everything, like trim and bumpers, comes with the car.

          Many Florida cars started life in the rust belt and retired to Florida with their owners.

          I remember driving to central Florida to buy a 1963 Avanti. The car looked great inside and out. The first thing that I did was to get down on the floor and look under the car. I could tell by the seller's face that he knew that the sale was done then. The torque boxes were rusted completely away. I later determined that that Avanti had spent most of its years in the Cleveland, Ohio area and only recently had retired to Florida.
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Gunslinger View Post
            Before anyone can give you a decent figure, you need to get under the car and check out the frame and torque boxes (aka "hog troughs"). If they're bad, about all you have is a parts car unless willing to repair them which isn't cheap. Also...is the exterior chrome present and what condition? Original wheels? Automatic or 4-speed? Interior condition?

            Lots of things need known. It may well be the basis of a fine restoration or a money pit of unimaginable magnitude. If you can get photos of the entire car...interior, exterior, underneath and under the hood it will go a long way towards coming up with a reasonable asking price. The serial number would help as well as far as determining if some items or original or retrofitted.

            Avantis are worth owning and restoring but one needs to be educated on them first...that can help keep you from spending too much and getting buried financially.
            [/I]
            I had the hog troughs changed on mine and had it repainted and last year the supercharger rebuilt. I would do it again in a hearbeat. Wonderfull piece of art and automotive engineering history combined.
            Someday, they wil trully appreciate up where they belong. In the meantime it is a lot of fun and enjoyment. i only waited 40 years to get one...

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            • #7
              It's usually affordable to get an Avanti running and have fun driving it. Few cars will get more looks, questions and 'thumb's-up.' On that basis, it's a fun way to go. Most times, a Stude V8 can be awakened from years of slumber and drive on for many more years. It will smoke, because it needs valve stem seals, but that can be ignored. However, if there are serious problems then, that's a different story.

              The brakes and front suspension will usually need rebuilding. This can be done in steps and for relatively little money if you can do the work yourself.

              Where it gets expensive is:

              As mentioned, if the torque boxes and frame are too far gone, they are major bucks, time and labor.

              If one decides to do an accurate and original restoration. The interior is expensive. The chrome is expensive. Should the supercharger bits be missing or if the supercharger needs a full rebuild, that's expensive.

              Once one gets inside the engine, there's the slippery slope to do it as good as it can be done. Most of us are no longer satisfied with the CASO way - grind the old valves, dingleball hone the cylinders, new rings, gaskets and hope to get another few thousand miles out of the engine before rust kills the body/frame. A really right engine rebuild begins at $3000 and goes up from there.

              Bottom line - the Studebakers still offer about the most fun for the buck in the old car hobby, as long as one does it for fun, without looking to ever get back the money. That's why so many of us have been owning and driving them since they could still be bought new.

              jack vines
              PackardV8

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              • #8
                Hey Noodle,you have a "heck of a way "to join the Studebaker Drivers Cub at 22 yrs. old and trying to"jump on this R2 Avanti. I think this proves to all of us,more "senior"Studebaker folks that you "share with us" your love of Studebakers. If you follow the," follow the info provided above", you should be able to make a "very good decision on this car. Good Luck with the Avanti! Let us know how it turns out, and welcome to the club. Mike..
                Last edited by hawk58man; 02-11-2014, 04:05 PM.

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                • #9
                  Noodlef2002, Welcome to the Studebaker group. You also have a very active Avanti owner's group in FL that I'm sure would lend a hand to look over the car. The contact for the club is Tom Pinnel, president of the John Ebstein Avanti Owners club in FL. His email contact listed in the AOAI International web site is tom.pinnel@yahoo.com Some members may live in your area and might even know the car. Drop Tom a line and explain your situation. I'm sure they would like to help as they are a great group of guys, having met many of them at the International Meets. Avanti's are addicting. I bought my first one at age 17 in the 60's (a 64) and went 42 years before getting another one (76), added another one (89),this past December. Good Luck!
                  sigpic[SIGPIC]

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