Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Exhaust studs & freeze plugs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Exhaust studs & freeze plugs

    I have broken off 1 of 4 original exhaust to pipe studs...Its amazing how no threads will hold things on...Anyway, should I fart around with
    trying to twist them out or drill and tap ? Best way to pull freeze plugs ? Last time I did it I damaged the inner rim of block....

  • #2
    On getting the exh studs out, heat is your friend. Heat the area surrounding the stud cherry red, let cool and use and extractor if there isn't enough of the stud remaining to grip with vise grips or similiar tool
    Removing the plugs, I drill a hole in them and use a large sheetmetal screw, screw the screw in and then using leverage pry on the screw with a claw hammer, or prybar. IF the screw pulls out without the freeze plug drill chisel or punch in the middle of the freeze plug, stay away from the outer edge, thats when you could break off a portion of the block casting.
    Have fun, two of the worst jobs if your motor is still in the chassis.
    Russ
    quote:Originally posted by jackb

    I have broken off 1 of 4 original exhaust to pipe studs...Its amazing how no threads will hold things on...Anyway, should I fart around with
    trying to twist them out or drill and tap ? Best way to pull freeze plugs ? Last time I did it I damaged the inner rim of block....
    Russ Shop Foreman "Rusty Nut Garage"
    57 SH (project)
    60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

    Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
    53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
    57 SH (project)
    60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

    Comment


    • #3
      I tried and failed to remove broken exhaust flange studs from my manifolds. Finally wound up having to drill them all the way out and re-tap the threads... yuck.


      [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

      Clark in San Diego
      '63 F2/Lark Standard
      http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
      www.studebakersandiego.com

      Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I've found the word "screw extractor" to be a real oxymoron because more than likely they're not going to extract anything. Every so often I forget my previous experience, try using one and end up having it broken off. My advice? Drill it out, tap new threads and forget the screw extractor. Unless I'm mistaken, I think one of the studs could be drilled out and a bolt used with the nut on the top, negating the need for tapping threads.

        Comment


        • #5
          Here's a little trick that has worked well for me many times..
          Heat it up like you suggest, and then hold a candle against the stud.
          It will cool the stud off and wick up the parafin into the thread area.
          I have a stud removal tool that I really like.
          Partly because you can use an impact wrench on it to 'shock' the stud loose.
          If your stud is already broken, then it's drill and tap time.
          Jeff[8D]



          quote:Originally posted by rusty nut garage

          On getting the exh studs out, heat is your friend. Heat the area surrounding the stud cherry red, let cool and use and extractor if there isn't enough of the stud remaining to grip with vise grips or similiar tool
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

          Comment


          • #6
            I've had 50/50 success with the type of stud extractor where you pass the stud through a hole in a big round metal piece and attach a breaker bar to a hardened metal cam to turn the stud. A pipe wrench can work too if you have room for it. Jeff's trick is a good one I have used it before. Heat is a definite must in any case. I have very rarely successfully used an EZ-out on a stud or bolt that's corroded into its hole; they only seem to work well on fasteners with clean threads that have broken due to overloading. Also once an EZ-out gets hot and turns blue, it's worthless, just get another one otherwise it's going to break the next time you use it and that opens up a whole 'nother world of badness.

            nate

            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel
            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by N8N

              I've had 50/50 success with the type of stud extractor where you pass the stud through a hole in a big round metal piece and attach a breaker bar to a hardened metal cam to turn the stud.
              Ah, yes - that's the tool I used to break off my studs! [B)]


              [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

              Clark in San Diego
              '63 F2/Lark Standard
              http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
              www.studebakersandiego.com

              Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

              Comment


              • #8
                I fixed the broken stud in my exhaust the old school way, file the
                screw flat, center punch the screw dead center by eye, and then drill
                the screw all the way through. Keep going up a size until you reach
                the minor diameter, and unscrew the threads left with a screwdriver.

                End result:



                What I removed :







                Use these type of nuts when you reassemble :



                For the core plugs, I punch a hole into them with a LARGE screwdriver
                and then use a tire iron to hook the cup and pop it out. Its harder
                to do with the flat ones, but still works well.

                Tom

                '63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: 97 Z28 T-56 6-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires
                '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                Comment


                • #9
                  For the freeze plugs, I modified a tool that I made using a 3 1/2 inch or longer bolt a 1 1/2 by 2 inch long piece of round stock as the slide weight. And a 3/8 wood screw welded to a long or connecter nut in 3/8 size. To use drill about a 5/16 hole in the freeze plug, thread nut section in a ways attach bolt with slide, a few pulls --freeze plug out. Works good on incar removal where space is limited. You can use a wire brush on a 90 degree drill to clean out pocket where soft plug seats. If you want to use something other than the flat type of plug 302 Ford used same diameter shallow cup plug, so get a block plug kit in brass is often cheaper than buying six seperatly. Lou Cote

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've done the job....Sawed off all the studs flat and drilled and tapped. 3 of 4 went great. One went in off center but tight. I don't expect any pipe mounting trouble. On the freeze plugs...I tried the screw and claw method.....no go. Screw pulled right out. I ended up poking the cups through enough to tilt them, then popped them out. Found everything quite plugged up as expected. Finally I poked and flushed out roughly a quart+ of black sooty oatmeal. Got it running clear......new radiator, hoses etc...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Glad it worked for you, when you have one go off center, thats when it
                      helps to start small. You can carefully use a dremel tool with a port
                      bit or small grinding bit to grind on the "thick" side. Another trick
                      is to simply bare down on the drill bit in the hole and oblong the hole
                      toward the thick side. Sometimes when the material gets thin enough
                      and the heat of the drilling, the thread lock will weaken. Then you
                      can grab whats left of the bolt with a screwdriver and back it out.

                      Tom

                      quote:Originally posted by jackb
                      Sawed off all the studs flat and drilled and tapped. 3 of 4 went great. One went in off center but tight. I ended up poking the cups through enough to tilt them, then popped them out.
                      '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                      Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                      http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                      I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Freeze plugs have been covered. The best way to remove a broken off stud is with your welder. Simply add enough weld to the stud so you can grip it with your vise grips. The heat from the welder will also brake the stud lose.

                        Comment


                        • #13


                          This manifold had the stud broken off below the surface. We built it up with weld.



                          Then weld a larger nut to it through the hole in the nut. Now a wrench will back it out. For exhaust manifolds (I owned a muffler shop for 25 years) I always let the weld on the stud/nut cool and then heat the cast iron around it to cherry red trying to keep the stud from getting red. I've never had any luck with easy-outs. They just snap off and make things worse.

                          After running a tap through the above hole to clean out the dirt it was as good as new. It's easier on the larger manifold studs.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Keep in mind guys, that not EVERYONE has a welder, or knows how to weld
                            or - is comfortable with flames. People that can weld, tend to charge
                            for their services, most people have a center punch and drill.

                            Tom
                            '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                            Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                            http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                            I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X