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1951 2R5 Starting problem

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  • Ignition: 1951 2R5 Starting problem

    Hello. I am new to the group as I have aquired a 51 2R5. It was neglected for the last 30 years. Before it was parked the owner bought a new motor but never started it. He wanted to restore it but lost interest.

    I pulled the drain plug and there was no oil in it. I turned the motor over by hand so it seems to be free. I removed the oil cap to put oil in it and discovered where the dip stick was. This truck is 6 volt and I dont have a problem keeping it that way. Just keep all terminals clean. I bought a fresh battery attached it to the starter, positive ground, and it didnt move. Disassembled it, cleaned all surfaces to like new, reinstalled it and now the motor is turning over very nice.

    Since everything on this truck was disassembled I am not sure that all these parts actually came with it. The motor is a 51 with a B type Autolite distributor. I discovered the distributor turns counter clockwise so I put the wires on according to the shop manual. I have it at top dead center with the mark and valves closed. All the wiring is gone, but the coil says dist and batt on it so that makes the wire from the distributor easy. Since this is positive ground I figured I would attach the batt wire to the negetive post to complete the circuit. Number one lined up, starting fluid, nothing. Took the distributor appart, cleaned the points, checked everything with an ohm meter to make sure that everything flows, put it back in, still nothing. I am now getting a little spark at my jumper wire when the points open.

    The coil is original and may be suspect. The question finally is, a modern 6 volt coil has plus and minus on it, how does it attach? + to positive or negitive?

  • #2
    I attached the dist wire to the positive side of the coil. Negitive to the batt or negitive side of the new coil. Still doesnt have spark but the points spark. Checked wires for resistance, turned out bad plug wires. Fired right up. Very cool

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    • #3
      Persistence paid off in this case. Always tough to know what the previous owner did. Welcome to the Forum, hope you like it here. Hope you will enjoy your truck once you have all the issues fixed.
      Frank van Doorn
      Omaha, Ne.
      1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
      1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
      1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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      • #4
        If you have questions or need parts for your truck try the Studebaker Truck Farmer's Site. A lot of knowledge over there. Join now!
        http://www.network54.com/Forum/23885/

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        • #5
          Check out the San Diego Chapter, lots of active Studebaker people down that way.

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          • #6
            You did a nice job of getting the ignition ready. There is one other procedure I recommend and here is why. Some of these motors have had the oil pump shaft out. The distributor shaft is connected to the oil pump shaft. When the mechanic reinstalled the oil pump shaft out, he didn't likely put it back into the same camshaft teeth that it had been meshed with. That changes the distributor rotor but not the timing mark. You want to be sure the distributor rotor is pointing to the #1 plug wire connection when the #1 piston is at TDC of the compression stroke.
            Take the #1 spark plug out and crank the motor with your thumb over the plug hole. You'll be able to tell when the piston is traveling up on the compression stroke. Stop cranking when you think the piston is at TDC and then verify by looking down the plug hole. The timing mark should be at or close to the pointer. Install the distributor cap and put the #1 plug wire into the distributor terminal that is above the rotor. That will cause the electric impulse to travel to the correct spark plug.
            Good luck!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by 41 Frank View Post
              Persistence paid off in this case. Always tough to know what the previous owner did. Welcome to the Forum, hope you like it here. Hope you will enjoy your truck once you have all the issues fixed.
              Originally posted by doublepaddle View Post
              If you have questions or need parts for your truck try the Studebaker Truck Farmer's Site. A lot of knowledge over there. Join now!
              http://www.network54.com/Forum/23885/
              Originally posted by doug View Post
              Check out the San Diego Chapter, lots of active Studebaker people down that way.
              Thanks for the link I will check that out. I heard there is a good group here so I will look for them., and thanks for the welcome.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Pentax645 View Post
                You did a nice job of getting the ignition ready. There is one other procedure I recommend and here is why. Some of these motors have had the oil pump shaft out. The distributor shaft is connected to the oil pump shaft. When the mechanic reinstalled the oil pump shaft out, he didn't likely put it back into the same camshaft teeth that it had been meshed with. That changes the distributor rotor but not the timing mark. You want to be sure the distributor rotor is pointing to the #1 plug wire connection when the #1 piston is at TDC of the compression stroke.
                Take the #1 spark plug out and crank the motor with your thumb over the plug hole. You'll be able to tell when the piston is traveling up on the compression stroke. Stop cranking when you think the piston is at TDC and then verify by looking down the plug hole. The timing mark should be at or close to the pointer. Install the distributor cap and put the #1 plug wire into the distributor terminal that is above the rotor. That will cause the electric impulse to travel to the correct spark plug.
                Good luck!
                Thanks for completeting what I neglected to write out in my original post. You are absolutely right! You never know what anyone has done before and even then they may not remember what work had been done. Looking forward to driving it.

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                • #9
                  Be aware that the battery cables used with 6V are much thicker than those used with 12V

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WinM1895 View Post
                    Be aware that the battery cables used with 6V are much thicker than those used with 12V
                    Thanks for the reminder. I am on the hunt for #1 or #2 cables.

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