Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

R1 fuel pump rebuild proceedure - w/pics!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • studebakerkid
    replied
    I had to do similar as kenmike2 twenty years ago with the 54 to avoid vapor lock. Now with the transplated bowtie 250 I still have the fuel recirculating. You would be surprised how easy it is to remove the filler neck steel pipe and weld in a fuel tight fitting.

    If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

    65 2dr sedan
    64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
    61 V8 Tcab
    61 Tcab 20R powered
    55 Commander Wagon
    54 Champion Wagon
    46 Gibson Model A
    50 JD MC

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    Might be on one of these threads :

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ms=return,line

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...ms=return,line

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    Wow, this thread took off again. I have been busy with my dad visiting
    from Michigan so I havent been here much. I lost the stock fitting so
    I got the info from someone here I believe. I seem to remember having
    to drill something out. Its been a while.

    Yes, the pump seal IS leaking, and sucks oil into the top of the pump.
    I have a tube into the fitting on the top of the pump to suck the oil
    into the intake and keep it from coating the engine. Not the best way
    to solve the problem, but it allowed me to drive the car home.[xx(]

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • Kenmike2
    replied

    to handle our AZ heat and prevent vapor lock on ALL STUDEBAKER ENGINES here's how I do it. Under the hood, eliminate all heat soak items from the fuel system. Slow moving fuel will absorb gobs of heat if the external temp is very high, and vapor will result. ELIMINATE HEAT SOAK CAPABILITY. I remove the fuel pump and any/all other under hood items that can retain fuel.
    Then I re-route the fule line up the firewall, and over to the carb inlet with a metal cannister fuel filter less than 4 inches from the carb inlet. Get it just as close as the air filter housing will allow. Use a filter with the return branch tube and plumb a return tube all the way back to the tank. DON'T SHORTCUT THIS ITEM. The rETURN FUEL MUST GO ALL THE WAY INTO THE TANK WHERE IT CAN BE RECOOLED BY THE BULK OF THE FUEL IN THE TANK. The tank itself is a huge heat exchanger and will reconvert any vapor back to liquid fuel.
    Next put an electric pump somewhere near the tank to push fuel forwaard to the engine.
    I put icing on the cake by putting "firesleeve" insulator material around the fuel supply tube and the fuel return tube for at least 3 feet down from the filter at the carb.
    This system has withstood PHX heat of 113 degrees and sat idling with A/C on for as much as 30 minutes in 113 heat and has not vapor locked EVER under any circumstances. The water temp went to 240, it lost no water, and the A/C worked great.
    You can cut corners if you like but if you want a system that works with todays fuels this is it.
    See my website under Avanti R4004 for more details and photos.
    Regards
    Ken Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • Kenmike2
    replied
    The higher in the engine compartment AND the closer to the carb fuel inlet the better. Use this as your design criteria and you'll be OK.
    Regards
    Ken Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • nels
    replied
    Don't know if this has been mentioned but I have never been successful at overhauling an R series pump with the new kits. The stem seal always leaks and fills the top of the diaphram with oil. Check yours after you put some miles on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • bams50
    replied
    My question: If someone is building a non-R2 car from scratch and installing an R2 engine, and is concerned with function and not originality, what would be the ideal setup for the return line?

    Robert (Bob) Andrews- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys)
    Parish, central NY 13131






    Leave a comment:


  • Mike
    replied
    The return line comes from a "T" at the fuel pump on early Avanti's. They use a sealed fuel filter on top of the engine, and no sediment bowl. Later Avanti's use the sediment bowl, with its internal filter, and a restricted port for the return line.
    I think all the "Jet Thrust" Larks & Hawks used the sediment bowl.
    I agree, it's better to return fuel from the highest point in the engine compartment.
    Although the Stude manual says the purpose of the return is to cool the pump, considering the .040" restriction, it doesn't flow enough to do that. Similar setups by other manufacturers are called "vapor diverters". An important function is to allow pressure to the carb to bleed off when the engine is shut off.
    Tom measured the restriction in the "T" for the return, on his early setup. Hopefully, he can tell us the size and where, exactly, it was.
    Mike M.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kenmike2
    replied
    Very good job of presenting the process.
    Question: I have worked on a number of R1's over the years and I have one in my shop right now. The return tube that vents all the way back to the tnk comes off the filter/sediment bowl that's plumbed into the fuel line just before the carb.
    In your pictures it appears that the small brass 90 degree fitting stacked on the outlet side of the pump fitting is possibly the return fitting? If so is there a 0.040 orifice inside?
    If it's the return it cannot be real effective in that location. You might want to investigate that part of your system. As vapor formation typically occurs right up on top of the engine where the heat soak is maximized.
    REgards
    Ken Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...TOPIC_ID=22842

    I posted the above thread concerning this issue. AOL closed their FTP
    last October, I needed a new place to store my pictures. Photobucket
    and other free sites are blocked at most peoples Work, including mine,
    and that was not an option. "Emperorjordan" is a domain of a friend of
    mine, and he was nice enough to host all these Studebaker & GM brand
    pictures even though he is a Ford guy! Nice of him huh?

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by r1lark

    I can see all of them.....
    Wow, what is emperorjordan? I thought it was a hacker site, with an aggressive name like that, so I have it blocked! That is what is trying to load, never heard of it. Are these not on PhotoBucket where everyone else's are?
    Well unblocking the Emperor whoever he is, fixed it.

    StudeRich

    Leave a comment:


  • doug
    replied
    Great tutorial. The pictures almost tell it all. Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • r1lark
    replied
    I can see all of them.....

    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The NEW Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Tom; over the several years, something has happened to your Pics! They are just little boxes again, and right clicking and choosing "view image" didn't work either.

    StudeRich

    Leave a comment:


  • WCP
    replied
    If you feel the need for an extra sealant on the diaphragm, Permatex Hylomar HPF would be a better choice. I used it on the pair of air horn gaskets on my R2 to eliminate seepage around the air horn to body interface. After 3200 miles of highway driving this spring, it has been 98% successful. On later disassembly, the Hylomar separates and cleans up quite nicely.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X