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Power Brakes

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  • Power Brakes

    I am in the process of installing the Turner Disc Brake Kit. I have been reading many posts and pulled information off the web.

    I am not sure I read or understood something and need a bit of help. I think I saw a set up where a Studebaker owner used ONE hydrovac to power all four wheels. Looked like a plumbing nightmare but I think he ran the output of the hydrovac to a special "proportioning" valve that took the bosted fluid pressure divided it in half and then transferred the two outputs to a dual MC.

    Does this make any sense to anyone, or did I mis read stuff again?

    CRS

  • #2
    It's the OUTPUT of the MC that goes to the Hydovac,then out to the wheel cylinders, don't see how it would work.

    JDP/Maryland
    64 Daytona HT/R2 clone
    64 GT R2
    63 Lark 2 door
    58 Scotsman
    52 & 53 Starliner
    51 Commander
    39 Coupe express
    39 Coupe express (rod)

    JDP Maryland

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    • #3
      As noted many times here, the Hydrovac used in Studebakers only works with single cylinder master cylinders, as John notes it basically energizes the Hydrovac system, but will still function as non-power brakes if for some reason the power unit fails. If you are trying to use a Turner dual cylinder MC it will not work properly, at least as designed, so either no-power and dual MC, or power and no dual MC. There have been reports of only boosting the front disks with this setup but that I feel would not be wise. I wish Turner would note this issue on his website and when he sells his kits to those that want to use the Hydrovac system. It seems this issue comes up several times a year.

      There are dual Hydrovac setups on the market and some where used with large trucks over the years. Here is a link to one that is available for the street rod and modified folks:

      http://ecihotrodbrakes.com/remote_booster.html


      Dan White
      64 R1 GT
      64 R2 GT
      Dan White
      64 R1 GT
      64 R2 GT
      58 C Cab
      57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

      Comment


      • #4
        Bill, don't you have a dual circuit MC? would be MUCH easier to put the Hydrovac in a box and get a manual brake pedal. I don't think there's any way to use the Hydrovac without defeating the purpose of the dual MC.

        The only exception would be if you only used the power section on the front brakes, but that would make me real nervous because it would seem that the proportioning would be all off.

        nate

        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel
        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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        • #5
          I was not trying to add a PB unit to the Turner kit. I found a post, cannot remember where, but the owner used the output (now from the hydrovac) sent it to some sort of brass gizmo, where the pressure was divided and sent to both sets of brakes. It looked like a plumbing nightmare. N8N yes I have the dual MC with a Jeep MC which works well. We are just adding discs to the front, as I can't see using drums any more. I got my self into a bit of trouble a few years ago by buying 11" finned drims from a vendor that the studs could not be swedged (spelling) in. This will start another thread, but without asbestos based riveted shoes the car does not stop really great with "bonded" modern brake shoes. To add further confusion I found another post where someone was going to boost the fronts, and leave the rears as is.

          BG

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by bondobilly
            ...but without asbestos based riveted shoes the car does not stop really great with "bonded" modern brake shoes.
            My '54 (with completely stock Studebaker brakes) has non asbestos bonded shoes and I believe will stop with a disc braked Hawk with similar sized tires. All parts were new (30,000 miles ago) from Ted Harbit (what is now Phil Harris, Fairborn Studebaker). '54 and up Stude drum brakes are pretty good. If yours don't stop the car properly, they need attention. They should. If you've switched to a different MC, you may want to check bore size against a stock one to insure it is the same. If it is smaller, it will require more pedal pressure for the same braking action as stock.


            The advantage of disc brakes (IMHO) is that they work better than drum brakes when wet, and don't fade as quickly, and are easier to maintain.

            I made about 10 stops at Osceola from over 90 mph in rather quick succession with just a shade of noticeable fade toward the last couple of stops. If you do this often, or drive down fairly steep mountain sides where you have to use the brakes constantly, or drive through axle deep water, discs will work better than drums.

            Discs don't need adjustment and it is easier to replace the pads when the time comes.

            As far as stopping ability, however, if the brakes will slide the tires (and stock '54 and up Stude brakes will...as long as you don't go to some crazy sized tire), then stopping distance difference between discs and drums becomes the drivers' ability to modulate the brake force to be just prior to lock up.


            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

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            • #7
              Bondo,
              I vaguely recall reading the article you mention, but also recall someone else replying that restricting the flow to the (power assisted) front brakes to equalize the pressure to the rears defeats the purpose of having power assist in the first place.

              Joe H

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              • #8
                I found on the web an underfloor dual MC with booster. Neat setup and would have worked well on a Studebaker if the frame was straight and no crossmember holding up the door pillar.

                BG

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                • #9
                  Yep those have been around quite a while, but as you learned they don't work on a Stude, Bummer! I looked at these about 10 or so years ago and thought wow this would be great, NOT!

                  Dan White
                  64 R1 GT
                  64 R2 GT
                  Dan White
                  64 R1 GT
                  64 R2 GT
                  58 C Cab
                  57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

                  Comment

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