Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Puzzling overheating

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cool/Heat: Puzzling overheating

    I flushed out my cooling system in my Champion 6, removed the drain plugs and found very little crud in the system, then installed a new water pump from Studebaker Int'l a couple months ago. The high coolant temps of the past disappeared, running at 180-190 degrees after the job was completed. About 250 miles later though, the gauge reading has steadily climbed to 210, or slightly higher if I've been running at steady highway speeds for even 10 minutes. Such a change in such a short time tells me something is definitely wrong but since I'm seeing no loss of coolant out of the overflow after stopping, I'm wondering if it's possible the sending unit has suddenly failed, resulting in a high reading, or are there other areas I should be looking at? I've never had a thermostat fail in the summer but since this has been a 3 week transition it wouldn't seem like that could be the answer, or could it be?

  • #2
    Check the head gasket.
    Flaps sell a compound that makes your coolant turn color when exhaust gas gets into the cooling system.
    Retorqing the head gasket sometimes works but do not count on it.
    When hot exhaust gasses get into the cooling system, it will overheat!!
    Robert Kapteyn

    Comment


    • #3
      Really want to make sure it is actually at that temperature. Local flaps around here always have an infra-red thermometer behind the counter.

      Other question would be this: Is this high temperature seen only when the car is running down the road? Does it cool down when the car/engine are running at slower speed - say in town or similar?

      My '60 with L6 will run warmer going down the road at 60 mph. When you get off the highway it will come back down to mid-gauge or lower. My Dad said the 1950 Champion my grandparents had would always run at 3/4 on the heat gauge during the Texas summers. He said the instant you got into town it would start creep down. If you stopped at a stop light for a minute it would go back down to normal.

      Good luck

      Comment


      • #4
        Temps going up at highway speeds and not slower speeds can be indicative of a bad lower radiator hose. If the hose's internal spring is rusted away or collapsed the hose will close off under vacuum at higher speeds and restrict coolant flow.

        Check that lower hose and see if it squeezes too easily...if it does, replace it with a new hose and spring.
        Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

        Comment


        • #5
          if you hadn't pulled the expansion plugs to check for gunk in the block, don't trust the drain cocks to tell you what's back upstream. I also had this same problem with a clogged radiator. Ran @ 170 around town, boiled over at 60 mph....gotta check everything..start with radiator temp, sending and dash units.....keep going...GL

          Comment


          • #6
            @ rkapteyn, if exhaust gases are getting into the coolant, wouldn't the inverse be true also that coolant is escaping from a bad gasket? There's been zero loss of coolant so far. @ 62champ, I'll check on that infra-red device, thanks; it runs up near 210 (if the gauge is right) around town also, where 3 weeks ago it was running at 180, a slight increase in temp out on the highway. @ Gunslinger, the lower hose is brand new.

            Comment


            • #7
              If the timing is off, it will cause it to run hot too. Check the vacuum advance, the diaphragm can rupture without any visual clues.
              Bez Auto Alchemy
              573-318-8948
              http://bezautoalchemy.com


              "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

              Comment


              • #8
                Also, any brake drag will cause it to get hot. Once I solved that problem and put a more modern core in the rad, mine's staying cool. Good luck.
                Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Before wasting time and spending money unnecessarily, check the resistance of the sending unit at room temperature. They do go bad by losing resistance, causing the temperature gauge reading to rise. Eventually the gauge will peg and at that point it should be disconnected at the sender, to save the gauge. If that proves not to be the cause, then proceed with the other suggestions from posts 2-8.
                  Disconnect the lead to the sending unit at the sending unit and check the resistance with a simple multimeter from the brass terminal to the engine block. You should read 780-800 ohms at 68-70F for a 12 volt system. If your reading is considerably lower than that, then you have found the problem. Acquire a new sending unit. This should always be the 1st thing to check on a suspected over-heating issue, particularly when no loss of coolant is observed.
                  If your vehicle is 6 volt, then the resistance values may be different, but the same advice applies.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    over heating

                    Originally posted by K Russell View Post
                    I flushed out my cooling system in my Champion 6, removed the drain plugs and found very little crud in the system, then installed a new water pump from Studebaker Int'l a couple months ago. The high coolant temps of the past disappeared, running at 180-190 degrees after the job was completed. About 250 miles later though, the gauge reading has steadily climbed to 210, or slightly higher if I've been running at steady highway speeds for even 10 minutes. Such a change in such a short time tells me something is definitely wrong but since I'm seeing no loss of coolant out of the overflow after stopping, I'm wondering if it's possible the sending unit has suddenly failed, resulting in a high reading, or are there other areas I should be looking at? I've never had a thermostat fail in the summer but since this has been a 3 week transition it wouldn't seem like that could be the answer, or could it be?
                    I experienced the same thing in a 6 pickup I finally traced it to a broken spring in the distributor advance mechanism Dave

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OK, getting a reading on that sending unit that tells me it's probably the culprit. Where to get one? Can't find any online from any sources, nothing at Studebaker Int'l for the 6cyl. engine after 1955, other than the truck engine

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1539876 is the correct Temp. Sender for a '56 or '57 Champion 185 6, you did not say what you have. If you check other Stude. Vendors and or ask at S.I. you can get one.

                        If I remember correctly, this is the Larger one, probably 1/2 inch pipe thread, the later Engines use I believe a 3/8 inch pipe thread smaller unit.
                        StudeRich
                        Second Generation Stude Driver,
                        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 62champ View Post
                          Really want to make sure it is actually at that temperature. Local flaps around here always have an infra-red thermometer behind the counter.

                          Other question would be this: Is this high temperature seen only when the car is running down the road? Does it cool down when the car/engine are running at slower speed - say in town or similar?

                          My '60 with L6 will run warmer going down the road at 60 mph. When you get off the highway it will come back down to mid-gauge or lower. My Dad said the 1950 Champion my grandparents had would always run at 3/4 on the heat gauge during the Texas summers. He said the instant you got into town it would start creep down. If you stopped at a stop light for a minute it would go back down to normal.

                          Good luck
                          That was exactly my experience about 25 years ago, on the interstate, with a 1960 lark, 3 speed, that only had 40,000 miles on in. I tried all I could think of: new radiator, hoses, head gasket, 3.31 rear end, premium gas with octane booster, etc.. Nothing ever changed. If pushed to 65 mph for long, the needle would climb to where it would begin to detonate. Only slowing to 45-50 mph a few miles would help. Around town it was great. After a few thousand miles of limping it along, I sold it, and have never had another six cylinder Stude since. Good luck trying to fix it. I doubt it's broke. Just the nature of that little six.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thank you for that part number. I can't find any other vendors who sell a sending unit for this engine. S.I. doesn't list it either but I'll call and hope.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              try Studebakers West if you haven't already.
                              1951 Custom
                              1958 Packard Hawk < resto project
                              1962 Champ
                              1963 Standard R1 4 speed
                              1963 Avanti R1
                              1963 GT Hawk R2 4 speed
                              2006 Avanti Convertible

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X