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Enlighten me on the specifics of OD, and show me a wiring diagram.

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  • Transmission / Overdrive: Enlighten me on the specifics of OD, and show me a wiring diagram.

    I'll be honest while I'm currently planning on swapping in an OD trans into my car, I don't know a great deal about them. I understand a regular tranny just fine, but know very little about the way a Borg Warner OD functions. I wanted to know if someone could one, give me a wiring diagram for the tranny, and maybe a custom wirng diagram that would work in a hot rod setup. and two just explain how it all works, or lead me to something will explain it all. I plant otswap one in but I get the feeling that it'll be alot more complicated than a standard tranny swap, I'm what the best way to install it is, and the best way to wire it. My ears are wide open so someone please teach me about these tranny's, so I know what I'm up against.

  • #2
    You need to look on Bob Johnstones tech pages. This and a lot other info you are seeking is there.

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    • #3
      Bob Johnstone is the man. This site is my number one place to hang out. His site is my number one place to find valuable info.

      http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/...orgWarner.html
      '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

      "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

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      • #4
        Also Dozens of Overdrive posts here, of people tying to find out how they work, if they are working properly, how to fix them etc. All with good answers and references to other sites. Try the Search function.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          The Studebaker Shop Manual is your friend. Have you ordered one yet?
          PackardV8

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          • #6
            Ditto to all the above. As far as the Studebaker types in the 50s-60s, there is the T96 which was used with the sixes, the T86 which was used with the low power V8s, and the T85 which was used in 56-57-58 in the Packard 352 engined 56 and supercharged 289 57-58 Golden Hawks and also in the Packards. T96 is very light duty, and T86 medium duty, and T85 heavy duty so if you have a hotter engine in the 53 than a 232, 224, or 259, or 289 2 barrel ie above about 200 hp or so then a T86 might be marginal. ie, 289 4 barrel, or R1 or R2.

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            • #7
              An engaged overdrive is used primarily on the open road rather than around town driving.
              If you keep the overdrive cable pulled out, your transmission operates as the normal standard shift you are familiar with.
              If the cable is pushed in, overdrive is allowed. It can not be engaged until your speed exceeds 25-30 mph. You will also be free-wheeling, meaning there will be no engine compression to slow you down if you back off the throttle. You will regret this most when you are descending a mountain and your brakes overheat and lose all function. Simply disable OD before cresting a mountain.
              With overdrive enabled, once you attain sufficient speed, you simply let off the throttle and the overdrive engages, decreasing engine rpm by 30%, maintaining forward motion with greater fuel economy.
              If you start ascending a hill or want to pass, you simply put the throttle down, grounding the kickdown switch and reverting to a direct third gear.
              Overdrive can also be attained in second gear once the requisite speed is attained. This is ideal for entering a highway from the ramp where you want to quickly attain a merging speed.
              Many flatlanders drive with their overdrive engaged all the time. It is a fuel saver that can also extract its toll on the brakes.

              I've lived with it and without it. I prefer with it.
              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
              '33 Rockne 10,
              '51 Commander Starlight,
              '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
              '56 Sky Hawk

              Comment


              • #8
                OD

                Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
                An engaged overdrive is used primarily on the open road rather than around town driving.
                If you keep the overdrive cable pulled out, your transmission operates as the normal standard shift you are familiar with.
                If the cable is pushed in, overdrive is allowed. It can not be engaged until your speed exceeds 25-30 mph. You will also be free-wheeling, meaning there will be no engine compression to slow you down if you back off the throttle. You will regret this most when you are descending a mountain and your brakes overheat and lose all function. Simply disable OD before cresting a mountain.
                With overdrive enabled, once you attain sufficient speed, you simply let off the throttle and the overdrive engages, decreasing engine rpm by 30%, maintaining forward motion with greater fuel economy.
                If you start ascending a hill or want to pass, you simply put the throttle down, grounding the kickdown switch and reverting to a direct third gear.
                Overdrive can also be attained in second gear once the requisite speed is attained. This is ideal for entering a highway from the ramp where you want to quickly attain a merging speed.
                Many flatlanders drive with their overdrive engaged all the time. It is a fuel saver that can also extract its toll on the brakes.

                I've lived with it and without it. I prefer with it.
                I have somewhat of a curious question, if you were engagge in OD decending a long grade and the engine was under continuous compression and you slowed down to less than 30 MPH while still under compression would the OD continue engaged?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by altair View Post
                  I have somewhat of a curious question, if you were engagge in OD decending a long grade and the engine was under continuous compression and you slowed down to less than 30 MPH while still under compression would the OD continue engaged?
                  I believe when the governor opens, it drops out of OD, because sometimes I can hear the governor click as it simultaneously drops out. However, at that point, the car has slowed to where there is not much engine braking occurring. It also drops out at a higher braking speed when in 2nd OD than when in 3rd OD. Not sure why, but since there is more engine braking going on in 2nd OD at a given speed, than in 3rd OD at the same given speed, that would indicate it is the governor that controls drop out.

                  Still, not sure if it would remain engaged under compression, at higher speed, if the governor were to fail and open.

                  I also know it is possible to raise or lower the OD kick in/out, by playing with the spring in the governor. But that's another issue.

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                  • #10
                    Overdrive can also be attained in second gear once the requisite speed is attained.
                    Overdrive can be attained in first gear of a Flight Hawk and a Champion 6-cyl and a 4.56 rear gear if you are seventeen.

                    I have somewhat of a curious question, if you were engagge in OD decending a long grade and the engine was under continuous compression and you slowed down to less than 30 MPH while still under compression would the OD continue engaged?
                    No, OD will disengage and freewheel.

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

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                    • #11
                      Ahhh....I remember first gear overdrive...'57 Silver Hawk with a 3.92 rear end...and I was also about seventeen years old! (We are not recommending this, however.)

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                      • #12
                        Everything to answer your questions are in the service manual.
                        Tom - Bradenton, FL

                        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                        1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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                        • #13
                          I just finished (finally) getting the OD in my 1949 2R5 truck working. I found this article on Borg Warner overdrives to be extremely helpful: http://www.fordification.com/tech/overdrive.htm

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