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66 283 engine parts

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    I never assume any Studebaker has the original engine, but the 283"s I've pulled out of Studes were identical in every way to the Chevy 283"s, including the rod bolts.

    jack vines

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  • 2moredoors
    replied
    Originally posted by mrjazzmillcreek View Post
    Not all parts are the same,the temperature gage sending units are different.If you use a Chev unit your gage will not work.
    Sorry Ray, I stand corrected. I was only referring to the engine and did not consider parts that linked to the peripherals so you must be correct. I did say that the Chevy replacement fuel pump had a "slight" modification.

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  • Swifster
    replied
    The truck engine is the same as the car engine. It's a standard, 195 HP engine. And according to 'Less Than They Promised', more likely than not, GM brought a few engines in from Flint. It's not a big deal to paint a complete engine. PITA to paint just the valve covers.

    Keep in mind that this was their bread and butter V8. This was the base V8 for the Chevelle, the Impala/Bel Air/Biscayne, the Nova and the Chevy pick up trucks. Add in the Canadian cars...

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by 2moredoors View Post
    The Studebaker 283, I believe derived from the truck motor everything the same.
    It was also true for the Canadian Pontiacs, (Parisienne, Laurentian, Strato Chief)

    Craig

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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    I don't recall where I read it but memory tells me the U.S. built 283's had 5/16ths rod bolts but the McKinnon engines were built with 3/8's. I do not know if the Canadian engine was mainly for trucks or what.

    My 66 has a 327 in it because of me, not the factory engine. That one is on a engine stand here. I helped a guy pull the 327 from his Camaro with my cherry picker & installed an Edelbrock 350 in its place. He gave me the 327 for helping him. I had a 4 speed & bell housing so it was a cheap swap for me. The only expense I had was the clutch assy from NAPA (big mistake there- Chinese bearing lasted less than 2 months) & then replaced those with a Centerforce setup. I do recall however that S.I. got some 4 bbl carb parts that it appears Studebaker was going to offer as an option, but never did.

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  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    Around 1967/8 Chevy migrated from "small journal" rod and main bearings to "large journal" R&M bearings. The journals were about 0.100 inch larger. The 11/32 inch (diameter) rod bolts were replaced by 3/8 inch rod bolts.

    In the early 60s the highperformance engines use better rods ( small journal special rods were painted dark green).
    the only book I found did not indicate if there were better 11/32 bolts used in the green rods, or even available.

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  • Swifster
    replied
    A Chevy 283 is a Chevy 283.

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  • mrjazzmillcreek
    replied
    Not all parts are the same,the temperature gage sending units are different.If you use a Chev unit your gage will not work.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2moredoors
    replied
    Originally posted by warrlaw1 View Post
    Hmmm. had a guy at the cruise in swear his long gone '66 had a 327. I asked from the factory? he said: Ya, special order.
    I grew up in St.Catharines where the engines were made and some of my friends from high school ended up working at the McKinnon (GM plant) but like 41 Frank said there are a lot of falsehoods and myths. One guy even told me they kept the best blocks just for Studebaker, what a crock. Only difference was paint. The Studebaker 283, I believe derived from the truck motor everything the same. I did buy a fuel pump from my local FRAPS (Napa) listed for Chevrolet 283 and had to buy an elbow to configure the outlet line to the carb.

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  • 41 Frank
    replied
    A persons memory fades with time. Just another falsehood. File that piece of misinformation in the same place as the one about the Avanti still being made in Canada.
    Originally posted by warrlaw1 View Post
    Hmmm. had a guy at the cruise in swear his long gone '66 had a 327. I asked from the factory? he said: Ya, special order.

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  • warrlaw1
    replied
    Hmmm. had a guy at the cruise in swear his long gone '66 had a 327. I asked from the factory? he said: Ya, special order.

    Leave a comment:


  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Dick

    From what I can find: Car, Truck, other applications, uses 2020cp rod bearings and 994m main bearings by Sealed Power. So no difference there.

    BTW, did you ever get the interior in.

    Bob

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  • thunderations
    replied
    From what I know, the 283 McKinnon was the GM truck motor built in Canada. If there's any difference it would show up in replacement parts catalogs as "truck only" or have some clarification. The only modification Studebaker opted for was painting the valve covers yellow. That practice didn't last long due to the extra few dollars GM charged for it. Any and all parts I have gotten for my McKinnon have not had any deviations from standard GM 283's. Just wish Studebaker had opted to have the optional 327CI/350HP engine available too. What a hot rod that would have been, just like the Chevy Nova with that option.

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  • junior
    replied
    Originally posted by Dick Clemens View Post
    Can normal chevy 283 parts be used for rebuilding Mckinnon engines? Gaskets, bearings,cams etc.?

    Thanks for any info!


    studedick from the lower Ozarks
    yup...in fact it was kind of cool, recently bought a felpro oil pan gasket and on the box it had applications listed on it...included checker marathon, 65-66 Studebaker, and Avanti. junior.

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  • junior
    replied
    Originally posted by Warren Webb View Post
    The only difference I am aware of is the rod bolts are bigger.
    This is news to me too. What exactly is the difference? I've heard stories that stock 283's had weak(ish) bolts, but there was no use installing larger diameter bolts because there wasn't enough meat surrounding the bolts on the large end of the rod to remain safe. Once again that's what I've heard, may be fact or fiction. I was under the impression that a 283 is a 283 is a 283...lots of urban legends out there though. My particular 283 has been beat on by my Dad, and then both my brother and myself when we were teenagers. Back in the day it had a pretty lumpy cam (350hp hydraulic one from a vette), now it lives with a stock 305 cam, has been rev'd all its life and lived with 4:56 gears in the diff until a couple of years back, and still rocks on. (knock on wood)...bottom line, the stock rods and bolts have led a tough life and have survived. cheers, Junior.

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