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  • 224 Street Peformance

    Just bought my first Studebaker as some of you may have seen in the General Topics, it's an early '55 Commander Regal Coupe with a 224 4 Bbl. and 3 Spd. OD and the guys over there made a pretty good case for keeping the 224 and OD. I'm not against it but I'm the kind of guy that has to modify EVERYTHING I get my hands on. So tell me, what can I do with the 224? I'm not wanting to set the streets on fire but what can I do to increase low and mid range TQ for getting around in traffic and passing on the highway? It already has a 4 Bbl.and I'm planning dual exhaust, how about camshafts, raising compression to 8.5 or 9 to 1, etc.? I cut my teeth on Pontiac's and then switched to Chevy and I'm no newbie to performance engines just Studebaker's, I'm here to learn.

    Afterthought............ What might that have for a ring and pinion and was there ever a limited slip available that would fit it?

    Analog man in a digital world.

  • #2
    I like the idea of boosting the HP on the 224. A 9.0 or 9.5 compression should be good, I little bit of an overbore and a cam should wake that engine up some.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tom - Valrico, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1794.98)

    Tom - Bradenton, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

    Comment


    • #3
      Phil Harris can probably help you out with some camshaft upgrades and other parts.If you car is has the stock rear (Dana 44 with 19 spline tapered hub axles) Twin Traction units used in later Stude cars could be used.
      If the rear doesnt have a ratio tag on the cover, you have to pull it and count teeth or look on the ring gear for the ratio expressed as a larger number over a smaller number. IE 44 over 13.
      Phil Harris can be found at
      www.fairbornstudebaker.com


      3E38
      4E2
      4E28
      5E13
      7E7
      8E7
      8E12
      8E28
      4E2
      59 Lark
      etc

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      • #4
        The 224 is a REAL screamer with VERY short stroke and the same bore as it's bigger brothers. You can spin a 224 to 6000 rpm!!

        I have always thought a 224 would be a great motor to mste with some reworked heads with big vales, the biggest cam you can find and a blower pushing as much air as you can stand.

        WHAT FUN!

        Comment


        • #5
          Greetings, Hippie,

          Welcome to Studebaker V8 performance. For all the answers, go to racingstudebakers.com Everything you ever wanted to know is available with a simple search. Months of reading for free.

          The bad news; in any normally-aspirated form, the 224" is a buzzing little anvil. I know - I've driven one for twenty-five years. If you are contrarian enough to want to keep the little devil, turbocharging is the only way to go fast. Good 8.5/1 forged pistons will most likely be a custom-order. Everything else for the good engines will bolt on.

          Even turbocharged, nothing beats cubic inches. Unless you are racing in some specific lower displacement class, go for the inches. Your 224" crankshaft will most likely require regrinding and that will cost more than a 259" crank. With NOS 259" crankshafts available for $65 and pistons much more readily available and less expensive, there is no logicial reason to build a 224".

          Any 259" with decent cam and valve springs will turn more than 6,000 RPMs. Piston speed is not the limiting factor until we start talking about going above 7,500.

          Welcome aboard

          jack vines

          PackardV8
          PackardV8

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          • #6
            So should I just "Pass GO" and go directly to a 289 IF I can find one? Or do I commit the cardinal sin and build one of the umpteen SBC's in my garage? I want decent performance and mileage which I know I can pull out of one of my Bowties but ANYBODY could do it that way and I REALLY would like to keep my Studebaker all Studebaker.

            BTW, about how much does my '55 weigh in full street trim?

            Thanks again.

            Analog man in a digital world.

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by Hippie

              So should I just "Pass GO" and go directly to a 289 IF I can find one? Or do I commit the cardinal sin and build one of the umpteen SBC's in my garage? I want decent performance and mileage which I know I can pull out of one of my Bowties but ANYBODY could do it that way and I REALLY would like to keep my Studebaker all Studebaker.

              BTW, about how much does my '55 weigh in full street trim?

              Thanks again.

              Analog man in a digital world.
              Depending on how much work you want to do yourself, you can build a stong Studebaker V8 for about $2500-$4000. This would include all new stainless valves, hardened seats, boring, alingn honing, turning the crank .010, new pistons, new cam and lifters, new bearings, etc. If you haven't built up a Studebaker V8, get some help here on line--if you build it like a Chevy it will never last . . .

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              • #8
                You can get a 289 crank and it will interchange with the 224 crank you have now. There is a piston interchange with the Ford 300 CI 6 engine, and an R2 cam. Rebuild the block you have, it should be easy. Have your rods shot peened and polished. Port and polish your heads (think you probably have 555 heads). Gasket match your intake manifold and your exhaust manifolds, and you should be good.

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by Allan Songer

                  If you haven't built up a Studebaker V8, get some help here on line--if you build it like a Chevy it will never last . . .

                  What if I build it like a Pontiac? I was pretty handy with those back in the day. J/K, if I thought I had a clue about building a Studebaker I'd just plow on ahead and let the shrapnel fly! You guys will probably get sick of my questions before it's over.

                  Thanks for all the great input so far guys. SOOOO how hard IS a 289 crank to come by?

                  Analog man in a digital world.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Thanks for all the great input so far guys. SOOOO how hard IS a 289 crank to come by?
                    Good luck... [)]

                    I was talking to a guy a while back who said he scored a NOS one. He was more than happy to pay the $500.00 price for it.

                    Matthew Burnette
                    '59 Scotsman
                    '63 Daytona
                    Hazlehurst, GA


                    Cruising the Proving Ground Test Track

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a good used 289 crank, Lionel Stone is advertising one in turning wheels with bearings. Ask around, they are not that hard to come by. $500.00 sounds like a lot to me, unless it is all turned and ready to go. It seems there is one for sale on the unofficial swap page also.

                      http://www.studebakerswap.com/studebaker.shtml

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by whacker

                        I have a good used 289 crank, Lionel Stone is advertising one in turning wheels with bearings. Ask around, they are not that hard to come by. $500.00 sounds like a lot to me, unless it is all turned and ready to go. It seems there is one for sale on the unofficial swap page also.

                        http://www.studebakerswap.com/studebaker.shtml
                        Big thanks for that lead, there is a guy in there just a couple hours from me with a low mile 289 crank plus a complete running 289. [8D] Have e-mailed him.

                        Analog man in a digital world.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          $500 in a Stude box is the going price. Stones $350 with bearings are .020"-.020"'s or 30-30's

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                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by Alan

                            $500 in a Stude box is the going price. Stones $350 with bearings are .020"-.020"'s or 30-30's
                            So $500 for a complete car with a running 289 would be good provided there are no rods hammering? I may have found one.

                            Analog man in a digital world.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In a word, YES. Once you have the engine, it actually costs less to build a 289" than a 224" as the pistons are more readily available and less expensive. Save the 224" crankshaft, as they are rare and someone may want to build a small-displacement Bonneville engine some day. A 224" crank in a 232" block would be 201". Then, fully ported heads would almost be enough when assisted by a turbo.

                              Engines are air pumps. If you have build strong Ponchos, a Studebaker V8 will be no problem. There are a few little odd features, such as the thrust bearing adjustment, but really, good science is the same for any engine. I haven't come across anything which would make more power on a Chevy which would not do the same on a Studebaker. The good news is the Studebaker block is much stronger. They rarely need to be align-honed.

                              Thnx, jv.

                              PackardV8
                              PackardV8

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