Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

My chugging Avanti

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fuel System: My chugging Avanti

    Guys - I'm sure someone besides myself has had issues like this...

    I have a 63 Avanti that a previous owner put a Chevy 305/TH350 in. The engine was tired and I replaced it with a 350 (since the mounts were already there and it's a better engine in every way). After 120 miles of driving 'round town, it began chugging and pooping out frequently. In fact, I had to have that pilot mindset of always looking for a place to "set her down" just in case. It never disappointed and I was getting weary of driving an unreliable car, having to build in break-down time. Once it died and I coasted to a stop, if I counted to 100 usually it would restart and take me home.

    I got out the test equipment for my HEI and couldn't find a problem there. I took the top off the carb (Edel 1406) and cleaned what looked like normal crud out of the float bowls and gently blew air thru the works. Got to where it'd run about 30 seconds and die. Took the same carb off my T-Cab's 289 and swapped it with the 350 in the Avanti and included the fuel pressure gauge near the inlet. No difference... still died after 30 sec and the gauge was reading zero lbs.

    I'd changed my fuel filter before the test equipment came out, but now I took compressed air and after pulling the fuel line off the back of the filter, sent 100 lbs of air back to the tank. It fired up and was giving me 8 lbs of steady pressure! Yes!! Drove it to the gym, then the grocery, hardware store and almost got home and it frikkin' died again!

    When I got home (thankfully, I have a 4-post lift) I drained the tank at the bottom spigot and as I expected, the fuel was dripping fast but not running out in a stream.
    Today, it finally finished draining and I took the brass elbow off the bottom of the tank to find it impacted with crud. I mean it was PACKED with crud and I had to scratch my head, wondering how any gas got thru that at all.

    I have been wondering if I can rig up a hose to send down the fill pipe and attach it to my shop vac... maybe send a small hose up the tank from the bottom and try to suck more junk out..? I'm hesitant to pour anything but gas in there to chase more crud out and have done that already. The flow is a stream now. I'm just afraid there might be more stuff in there to clog the line when I'm 500 miles from home! Jeez, I really don't want to pull the tank out. A friend did that with his and he said it was a major pain.

    I know these tanks have baffles, so I'm not likely to get much with the vacuum hose idea down the throat, right?
    What would you do - or what did you do, if you've had a similar experience? Thanks!

  • #2
    Do not put gasoline fumes through your shop vacuum!
    Remove the tank and have it cleaned.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes take the gasoline tank out and find a local radiator shop that also specializes in cleaning and restoring gasoline tanks. They can clean the inside of the tank and make it like new. They can also test and repair any seams that may be seeping. As long as the baffles inside are intact they can recondition it. If not order a reconditioned or new tank from one of the avanti or Studebaker vendors.
      Last edited by okc63avanti; 03-31-2013, 06:31 PM.
      sigpic
      John
      63R-2386
      Resto-Mod by Michael Myer

      Comment


      • #4
        You don't really have a choice, Tom.

        If you want the car to be reliable and you don't want to blow up your house and shop in the process, the gas tank must be removed and professionally cleaned and coated. I've always endorsed GasTankReNu. Expensive, yes, but it works and with a lifetime warranty as long as you own the car.

        The sooner you do it, the sooner you can enjoy the car without worrying about when it's gonna take a dump on you. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Two years ago while the motor was out of my 76 getting rebuilt, I had the tank taken out and a radiator shop cleaned, coated the interior and re-soldered 36 spot welds holding the baffles in place. I also replaced the rubber gasket between the tank top and filler tube, all which helped stop the faint gas odor inside the car when I drove it. Re-doing the tank was about $150. The worst part is getting the tank out of the car. Cleaning the tank out is the only way to get the accumulated crud out of the tank.
          sigpic[SIGPIC]

          Comment


          • #6
            Used supercharger balls dumped in the tank, drain opened and towing down a bumpy road with frequent stops to add more fuel works if you really think it's that hard to pull the tank. We did this on a pickup once that had to be hauled 1000 miles home, but with the drain closed. Knocked all the crud loose. I'm not recommending it though, lol. Remember, that same crud is probably in the lines as well.
            Jim
            Often in error, never in doubt
            http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

            ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              ugh... actually, I relined the brakes and fuel, front to back. But I guess you're telling me something I needed to hear and although the balls-in-the-tank might do the job, if I've gone this far with the car, I might as well yank the tank and git 'er done.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey Tom,

                The crude coming out of the tank, varnish, or rust? If your inclined to DIY, take the tank out. If varnish buy a couple gallons of acetone, seal outlets on the tank, fill it and seal the filler pipe and let sit for a few hours, rotate the tank on its side, top and other side over the course of 6 to 8 hours. It will dissolve the varnish and leave the tank sparkling clean. If rust buy several gallons of muriatic acid (Lowes, Walmart, pool cleaning supply store), or Foz. Let the muriatic acid do as above drain and then use acetone (6 to 8 hrs.) to clean up the tank.

                Bear in mind that these chemicals are to be handled with care. Acetone is flammable and so is gas fumes, so do in a well ventilated area and by all means DO NOT expose to any kind of electrical source. A static spark will make you a crispy critter, homeless and then you'd look like me!

                If your not inclined to do it yourself, take the tank out and to a good radiator shop.
                Last edited by Bo Markham; 04-01-2013, 03:56 AM.
                Bo

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tomnoller View Post
                  ugh... actually, I relined the brakes and fuel, front to back. But I guess you're telling me something I needed to hear and although the balls-in-the-tank might do the job, if I've gone this far with the car, I might as well yank the tank and git 'er done.
                  Because you have a hoist, remember that before you pull the tank you need to remove the 90 deg outlet from the fuel tank before it will come out. Put a pipe plug in to replace the 90 or you'll find out how much liquid remained in the tank when you are cleaning it out of inside of the Avanti.

                  Bob

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks Bo! The crud looked like 50 years worth of accumulated dirt particles - non ferrous grit like stuff.
                    Either way, I will pull the tank today and most likely take it to someone with the right tools to do the job.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Check the tank vent and/or the gas cap.

                      Every once in a while back in the day we'd get a tank vent that was clogged or kinked or a gas cap that wasn't vented on a car without a tank vent.

                      The engine would run until the vacuum in the tank caused by the clogged vent or wrong cap would overcome the suction from the fuel pump and then the car would quit. You could stop for a while, allow pressure to equalize and then restart, but it would keep dying and no amount of fuel pump swapping, fuel filter changing, carburetor cleaning made a difference.

                      I agree, the tank needs to be boiled out and coated but it wouldn't hurt to look at whether you have a vented tank or not or are supposed to have a vented cap and don't have one.
                      Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
                      Kenmore, Washington
                      hausdok@msn.com

                      '58 Packard Hawk
                      '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
                      '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
                      '69 Pontiac Firebird
                      (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bo Markham View Post
                        Hey Tom,

                        The crude coming out of the tank, varnish, or rust? If your inclined to DIY, take the tank out. If varnish buy a couple gallons of acetone, seal outlets on the tank, fill it and seal the filler pipe and let sit for a few hours, rotate the tank on its side, top and other side over the course of 6 to 8 hours. It will dissolve the varnish and leave the tank sparkling clean. If rust buy several gallons of muriatic acid (Lowes, Walmart, pool cleaning supply store), or Foz. Let the muriatic acid do as above drain and then use acetone (6 to 8 hrs.) to clean up the tank.

                        Bear in mind that these chemicals are to be handled with care. Acetone is flammable and so is gas fumes, so do in a well ventilated area and by all means DO NOT expose to any kind of electrical source. A static spark will make you a crispy critter, homeless and then you'd look like me!

                        If your not inclined to do it yourself, take the tank out and to a good radiator shop.
                        No. If you put muriatic in the tank, no matter what else you do, there will be a slight trace left behind, and you will get massive rust. If you must put acid in the tank, use phosphoric, aka Naval Jelly.

                        For the cost of all those chemicals, you can get the tank professionally cleaned.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Tom If you pull and clean your tank dont forget to check the line inside to see if it has a plastic screen and if its pluged. Not sure if a Avanti has one or not but a lot of cars do.

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jnormanh View Post
                              No. If you put muriatic in the tank, no matter what else you do, there will be a slight trace left behind, and you will get massive rust. If you must put acid in the tank, use phosphoric, aka Naval Jelly.

                              For the cost of all those chemicals, you can get the tank professionally cleaned.
                              That my dear fellow is why you then fill it with acetone. Been doing it this way since the 70's and haven't had one rust out, yet. All most $200.00 dollars to have one boiled and sealed down here. Just boiled is $100.00 and 120 mile trip to get it to and from the shop. The cost of these chemicals is less then $75.00.
                              Bo

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X