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58 PH Super Charger box question

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  • Fuel System: 58 PH Super Charger box question

    I have a question for you, the 58 PH that I am working on has a very small tube that runs from the SC carb box floor, down to the
    timing cover and is held in place with a clip. It has a very very small hole on the carb box floor that the flare tube fitting goes into.
    I can not find but one reference to it in the parts book and that is only in the notes section (page 75 of the 55-58 Studebaker and 57-58 Packard parts manual)
    Note 15 --- when replacing base on model 57H-K7 before engine number PS 2,375, also order 1 ea #1543107 pipe, 1543108 nipple and 643335 clip
    I can find no other reference to this, doesn't show in SC illustration and I don't see the part numbers actually listed.
    Is that tube actually used on the 58 PH super charger -carb box ?
    64 Champ long bed V8
    55/53 Studebaker President S/R
    53 Hudson Super Wasp Coupe

  • #2
    Yes all '57 and '58 Supercharged Studes. and Packards used a "Fuel Drain" Tube in the bottom of the pressure box so small as not to lose much pressure, it is sometimes not still routed properly as yours is.

    Also be sure you have the "Fuel reference Line" spelled "equalizer" line, from the S/C to the top of the Fuel Pump.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      I've got one too, on my GH.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Steven Ayres View Post
        I've got one too, on my GH.
        My friend Jerry, who's had his 57 GH since the late 60's does not have that line on his car. His is a late 57 GH.
        64 Champ long bed V8
        55/53 Studebaker President S/R
        53 Hudson Super Wasp Coupe

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        • #5
          Hi Kerry,

          There was an S-P service bulletin about that line. I used to have that bulletion but it was lost with some other stuff I lost when I recently picked up a virus. You can get a copy of that bulletin over on the PackardInfo.com in their 1958 documents section. I'd get it for you but after picking up three different viruses during three different visits to that site, and losing days of work and a lot of data, I'm not willing to go over there and take a chance again.
          Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
          Kenmore, Washington
          hausdok@msn.com

          '58 Packard Hawk
          '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
          '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
          '69 Pontiac Firebird
          (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

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          • #6
            Robert Kapteyn sent me over to Bob Johnson's Avanti site and the info is --
            http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/fuelpressure.html
            When you regulate fuel pressure, with a boost signal (from the supercharger output volute), it impacts the engine operation significantly. Because the blower drive ratio varies through the VS series front pulley and internal planetary drive gear, the opening and closing could cover a wide range of pressures. This was more critical in the early McCulloch (53-58) because the split pulley would open in a heartbeat, increasing the boost almost immediately, also raising the fuel pressure pressure considerably (and immediately). The slower increase of engine rpm can't use the maximum fuel pressure it's receiving right away, so what happens is a drawback of supercharging in this manner.
            To see the way the McCulloch engineers solved the problem, you have to look at the rear bottom of the airbox. You'll find a small diameter drain tube, which dropped down to the valley over and ran forward to the drivers side (on my car) of the intake manifold, turned downward and ended. This tube was designed to vacate raw, excess fuel which puddled on the inside floor of the airbox when the fuel pressure spike exceeded demand and blew gasoline out the top vent of the carb. The drain would dump the raw gasoline onto the front of the engine, where the fan turbulence and heat would dissipate it quickly.
            If you ever watch a departing Golden Hawk, Packard Hawk or Sedan, whose driver has his foot in it, there will always be twin trails of black smoke coming from the exhaust, due to the very rich mixture, resulting from the larger jetting and the overload of fuel, in the airbox. It worked better in a passing situation, as the engine rpm was much higher to begin with, but was still evident.
            There was also a flapper valve on the airbox to open when the engine was stopped, to allow evaporating, undrained fuel to vent out of the air box.
            64 Champ long bed V8
            55/53 Studebaker President S/R
            53 Hudson Super Wasp Coupe

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