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Ford Aerostar front end under a Stude car?

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  • Front Axle / Front Suspension: Ford Aerostar front end under a Stude car?

    I just read and posted under another thread concerning a stude car front suspension swap under a Stude pickup.

    I wonder how bad it would be to slip an Aerostar front suspension module under a 1951-66 car or for that matter, a 1947-50 model? Why I wonder is decent steering/brakes and parts availability is very good plus the common 5 on 4.5" bolt pattern hub pattern. Yeah; I know about the 1950 Champion with its 4 luggers but, a matching 5 on 4.5" rear end would solve that riddle.
    --------------------------------------

    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

  • #2
    Try a forum search, I know it`s been done before on Studes.
    sigpic
    1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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    • #3
      Wasn't the Aerostar built on the Ranger pick-up frame? Early rangers used the twin I Beam that is difficult to modify for ride height without using dropped spindles or dropped I Beams. As far as 4 lugs for pre 51 cars, Mustang used the same 4 lug pattern and some of those rotors will probably interchange with Ranger or you can get any lug pattern on any rotor with aftermarket hot rod items.
      sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
      1950 Champion Convertible
      1950 Champion 4Dr
      1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
      1957 Thunderbird

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      • #4
        Maybe it was`t the Aerostar, but what ever it was it was a small rwd Ford van that was not a twin-I beam set up, we`re talking complete coilsprung unequal length a-arm `module` that you removed from the Ford and welded onto the Stude frame...over simplifing here, but that was the basics of it...perhaps not on this forum, maybe the HAMB?
        Last edited by junior; 03-03-2013, 07:12 PM.
        sigpic
        1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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        • #5
          Information can be found here ....http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/.../aerosusp.html
          Bez Auto Alchemy
          573-318-8948
          http://bezautoalchemy.com


          "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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          • #6
            Originally posted by thunderations View Post
            Wasn't the Aerostar built on the Ranger pick-up frame? Early rangers used the twin I Beam that is difficult to modify for ride height without using dropped spindles or dropped I Beams. As far as 4 lugs for pre 51 cars, Mustang used the same 4 lug pattern and some of those rotors will probably interchange with Ranger or you can get any lug pattern on any rotor with aftermarket hot rod items.
            Originally posted by junior View Post
            Maybe it was`t the Aerostar, but what ever it was it was a small rwd Ford van that was not a twin-I beam set up, we`re talking complete coilsprung unegual lenght a-arm `module` that you removed from the Ford and welded onto the Stude frame...over simplifing here, but that was the basics of it...perhaps not on this forum, maybe the HAMB?
            No Aerostar had the Ford Twin I Beam; they used the SLA (Short Long Arm) front suspension and rack & pinion steering.........
            --------------------------------------

            Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

            Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
              yup, that'd be the one I was thinking about....and yes, I wonder if anyone has tried this on a post war stude before?? thanks for posting this. regards, Junior
              sigpic
              1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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              • #8
                I am installing the Aerostar crossmember setup in my 2R5 right now. I didn't take out the drivers side diagonal support. I found a way to leave it mostly intact. I think that this will end up being a great setup. If anyone wants more details, let me know.
                Norm

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                • #9
                  I would think the Aerostar front end, given that it's a good fit in Stude pickups, would be too wide for Stude cars.
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gordr View Post
                    I would think the Aerostar front end, given that it's a good fit in Stude pickups, would be too wide for Stude cars.
                    That's what concerns me, I suspected such would be the case.
                    --------------------------------------

                    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Areostar track width or hub-to-hub dimension is almost identical to the 63 1/2" of the stock pickup (at least 2R5). I have seen a pickup with the Volare setup welded in. The track width was too narrow for the pickup and looked funny. It needed spacing adapters for the wheels. For the cars, refurbishing the suspension components may give you just a good a result. I suspect there is a way to put a power rack and pinion unit on the stock suspension setup. This would be the best improvement. They make a rack and pinion setup for C-1 Corvettes which might even be sort of applicable since it is similar suspension and steering linkage.
                      Norm

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                      • #12
                        I just remembered that Ford also produced an all wheel drive Aerostar. I'm not sure what the front differential ratio is on it or how strong it is. That could be interesting.
                        http://repairguide.autozone.com/znet...528006e077.gif
                        Attached Files

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                        • #13
                          If I recall the kit an exforum member was selling years ago was a couple of steel box members that had been drilled to accept the aerostar front suspension and bolt to the truck frame rails. If someone has figured out a easier way to use the aerostar parts....

                          What would be the ballpark salvage cost of the aerostar parts and what years vintage?
                          \"I\'m getting nowhere as fast as I can\"
                          The Replacements.

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                          • #14
                            He has some of the box tube adapters on Ebay right now. When I bought, he included a rack adapter but that doesn't show in the Ebay listing. The Aerostar years are 86 thru 94. The cost will vary greatly depending on what you want to do. If you find a good one with good ball joints, bushings,tie rod ends, brakes, bearings and rack that you are willing to use without replacement, it would be worth paying more. Complete running vans sell in the $500 to $1000 range depending on condition. People seem to keep them. You can also find them in wrecking yards. Cost will vary with what you find and how much work you do. I also took the spare tire and mount off the van I bought before I sent it to the scrap yard. I think it will mount nicely under the pickup bed. One real advanage of this Aerostar setup is that you can do it without welding to the frame. I put in more frame mounting bolts than the two that are on the adapters. I also figured out how to not cut out the drivers side diagonal engine support frame member to clear the rack input shaft. You will also have to install a power steering pump. I'm using one from a Lark. That involves installing the second pulley on the crankshaft (another case where I'm not doing it the conventional way).

                            As with any project, there are a lot of details to consider.
                            Norm

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                            • #15
                              I have a Ford Aerostar front-end under my '49 pick-up. The biggest problem was getting the height of the front down. Ended up cutting springs which gives a rough ride.

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