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  • Engine: Intake and exhaust manifold gaskets

    I have both the steel and fiber intake gaskets for the new 289. Which one to use? Also, should rtv red be used on both materials and on the exhaust manifold gaskets? Having brain freeze today.
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    Bob Shaw
    Rush City, Minnesota
    1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
    "The farther I go, the behinder I get."


  • #2
    I always prefer Steel, but either way no RTV.

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    • #3
      I also think the factory only used metal.

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      • #4
        I use metal only if it is compressible by a thousandth (copper) or so,,,and no RTV

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        • #5
          I would always use the composite gaskets.
          The OEM steel gaskets were great on a new surface/new engine, but the composite works better on rebuilds with mixed and matched heads/blocks/intakes.

          Just an opinion based on a little experience...
          Jeff
          Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 02-28-2013, 05:15 PM.
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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          • #6
            I've had failures with the composition gaskets. I trust the metal gaskets a bunch more than the fiber ones. Be sure that the mating surfaces are clean and flat and use a sealer like Permatex aviation formagasket as an RTV sealant will be attacked by gasoline, the stuff turns to jelly in the presence of gas. Bud

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            • #7
              Guys,
              Please describe your intake gasket failures in detail.
              I would like to know what the failures were, what type of composite gasket they were, what the engine/head/block combo's were.

              I would also like to hear about the steel gasket failures out there, too.
              Jeff
              Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 02-28-2013, 05:16 PM.
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

              Comment


              • #8
                Dave Thibeault tells Me the composite intake gaskets seal better.

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                • #9
                  I have never seen a copper Stude intake or exhaust gasket.
                  Is that what you meant? Or were you talking about the stock stude steel gasket with maybe some copper coat sealant?
                  Just curious.
                  Jeff


                  Originally posted by bosshoss61 View Post
                  I use metal only if it is compressible by a thousandth (copper) or so,,,and no RTV
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My dad and I lightly coated both sides of the composit gaskets with antiseize compound. We also were able to reuse them as even in the late 60's early 70's they were costly.

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                    • #11
                      An old drag racer trick I have succesfully used (copied/stole from others) through the years is to use Permatex Ultra-Copper on the intake side of the gasket, and put some grease on the head side of the gasket...for exactly the reason you state.
                      Reusability.
                      Sometimes you can take the intake on and off a race engine several times without hurting the intake gasket.
                      But the stock steel gasket, as supplied by Studebaker, was designed to be a one time use gasket.
                      Using it again is like Russian roulette with a full chamber.
                      Just sayin'...
                      Jeff


                      Originally posted by StudeRon956 View Post
                      My dad and I lightly coated both sides of the composit gaskets with antiseize compound. We also were able to reuse them as even in the late 60's early 70's they were costly.
                      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                      Jeff


                      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use the composite ones on the Lark and the '55, and not just because they seal better. If I ever needed to take off the intake manifold, which I used to do regularly on the '55, I can get a few more uses out of them, than I could with the steel gaskets. Of course the right thing to do is replace the gaskets altogether, but we ain't made out of intake manifold gaskets around here......

                        That said, I'd run from the composite gaskets that were made out of Teflon. I had those on my Lark R2 with the stock Jet Thrust R2 engine set up; iron intake manifold, iron heads, 289 block, and Paxton supercharger. I don't think they are produced anymore, but they were almost like a smooth white plastic type of gasket. I had those on the Lark for a couple of years, until the engine started having trouble warming up and idling properly. I think it was leaning out pretty badly too. Anyway, everything else looked fine, until I pulled the intake manifold off, and saw that a couple of the ports on the driver's side had distorted and blown out! The heat from the engine had caused the gaskets to lose their rigidity and eventually distorted, and since the engine had a Paxton supercharger, the air from the supercharger caused them to blow out from underneath.
                        1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                        1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                        1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                        1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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                        • #13
                          I remember those, too.
                          Same experience...... They 'looked' good, but sure didn't 'work' good...
                          Jeff


                          Originally posted by PlainBrownR2 View Post
                          <snip>
                          That said, I'd run from the composite gaskets that were made out of Teflon. I had those on my Lark R2 with the stock Jet Thrust R2 engine set up; iron intake manifold, iron heads, 289 block, and Paxton supercharger. I don't think they are produced anymore, but they were almost like a smooth white plastic type of gasket. I had those on the Lark for a couple of years, until the engine started having trouble warming up and idling properly. I think it was leaning out pretty badly too. Anyway, everything else looked fine, until I pulled the intake manifold off, and saw that a couple of the ports on the driver's side had distorted and blown out! The heat from the engine had caused the gaskets to lose their rigidity and eventually distorted, and since the engine had a Paxton supercharger, the air from the supercharger caused them to blow out from underneath.
                          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                          Jeff


                          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I assume that living in Minesota that this is a summer driven only car, you could use the R2 or R3 composite gasket that has a much smaller= restricted heat crossover area in it for a cooler carb and less of a chance of vapor lock. Lou Cote

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dynolou2 View Post
                              I assume that living in Minesota that this is a summer driven only car, you could use the R2 or R3 composite gasket that has a much smaller= restricted heat crossover area in it for a cooler carb and less of a chance of vapor lock. Lou Cote
                              Definately NOT the R3.....would never fit on a non R3 cylinder head or manifold.
                              Bez Auto Alchemy
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