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Tough 44 R/A replacement (was to toss or not to toss)

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  • Rear Axle: Tough 44 R/A replacement (was to toss or not to toss)

    I am in the process of transplanting a 289 w/OD & 44 open 3.31 from a 63' Cruiser to a 62' wagon that was 6 cyl and R/A 27 TT 4.56.

    The Cruiser is very rusty and most of the top screws to the R/A cover are rusted beyond socket use. I tried this evening to grab them with the vice grips but to no avail. The R/A has 90K and was turning nicely these past few years. The cover also has a rust hole through it @ 1 o'clock. Any suggestions on removing these rusty rounded screws ? Is it worth it to (chisel them off and) drill out for new screws ? Since there are at least 5-6 that would need refurbishing, I'd like some advise. As stated before I have a good 38K mile model 27 3.73 that I could use or a TT 4.56 (function unknown). Or I could simply try and find a nice 44 w/ TT @ 3.31 oe 3.73...

  • #2
    Can you clean them up and weld a bolt to them? Then you can use a wrench on that bolt.
    Pat Dilling
    Olivehurst, CA
    Custom '53 Starlight aka STU COOL


    LS1 Engine Swap Journal: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/jour...ournalid=33611

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pat Dilling View Post
      Can you clean them up and weld a bolt to them? Then you can use a wrench on that bolt.
      Pat's exactly right, although I'm sure he meant nut. In this case, heat is your friend. Just don't get all muscular with them. Just weld on a nut and try to turn it. If you feel much resistance, heat again and add your choice of penetrate. Lightly work the bolt back and forth until it starts to turn, then back it out. Just keep using heat and penetrate until it let's go.


      Bob

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      • #4
        Take a chisel or punch and try to unscrew the bolt by working it on the edge in a counter clockwise direction. Usually there is enough lubricant under the threads of these bolts that they aren't siezed and just need to be turned a little to come loose. Take your time and work around each bolt head. If this doesn't work you can still weld the nut on and turn it that way.
        Rob

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        • #5
          I think either a nut or bolt would work. I suggested a bolt thinking it would be easier to hold in place while welding to the stuck bolt head. Also, weld material on the sides of a nut could make getting a wrench on it more difficult, a bolt head would be above the weld. Just shows there is more than one way to skin a cat.
          Last edited by Pat Dilling; 01-14-2013, 07:09 AM.
          Pat Dilling
          Olivehurst, CA
          Custom '53 Starlight aka STU COOL


          LS1 Engine Swap Journal: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/jour...ournalid=33611

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Pat Dilling View Post
            I think either a nut or bolt would work. I suggested a bolt thinking it would be easier to hold in place while welding to the stuck bolt head. Also, weld material on the sides of a nut could make getting a wrench on it more difficult, a bolt head would be above the weld. Just shows there is more than one way to skin a cat.
            Pat

            Thanks for correcting my assumption. I was just thinking of the way I've always done 'em. I always use a nut, even if I need to bore the center out some, so I can bury the mig wire as deep and hot as I can in the center to generate maximum heat to the frozen bolt. Certainly no reason, your method wouldn't work as well.

            Bob

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            • #7
              Had not thought of welding through the middle of the nut. Great idea!
              Pat Dilling
              Olivehurst, CA
              Custom '53 Starlight aka STU COOL


              LS1 Engine Swap Journal: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/jour...ournalid=33611

              Comment


              • #8
                ...unfortunately, I'm guessing this to be the last Stude I wrestle with (chuckle, chuckle..)....and I do not own a welder of any sort. But the R/A is out of the car and would be easy to transport to someone with the heat.....I'll try the small chisel method and see what happens.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jackb View Post
                  ...unfortunately, I'm guessing this to be the last Stude I wrestle with (chuckle, chuckle..)....and I do not own a welder of any sort. But the R/A is out of the car and would be easy to transport to someone with the heat.....I'll try the small chisel method and see what happens.
                  Jackb..
                  You could use a cutting wheel and cut across the head of the bolt and use a screw driver to remove.. Used that many times to remove corroded bolts..
                  Ron Husak
                  Ron Husak
                  Conifer, CO
                  Living at 9200 feet and lovin it!
                  63 avanti R2 63R-2648

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                  • #10
                    CASO speaking: brought the R/A to local small shop. He will remove the cover.

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