Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sticky Steering G.T. Hawk

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Steering: Sticky Steering G.T. Hawk

    I took the Hawk on a 275 mile trip this past Thursday and noticed that when turning right or making minor corrections while driving the steering wanted to be "sticky" and hard to make corrections to the right. When I got home, I noticed the power steering pump reservoir was empty. I filled it up and thought things were fine. Today I took it on a 200 mile trip and noticed the same thing again. Check the power steering pump reservoir and it was still full. Also noticed that when I stopped and turned the steering completely from right to left, that the steering loosened up and was fine. When I got on the interstate, after say 10 miles, the steering started getting "sticky" again and continued until again it was pretty hard to make corrections to the left. I have a new power steering pump and a rebuilt control valve I got from Bob Helm all less than 6 months ago. It seems to work fine when you first drive the car. But after driving for a while on the highway, it starts getting sticky again. Any ideas??
    Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

  • #2
    Check the lube in the steering box. I had the same problem last year and the box was dry. We added some CV joint grease with a turkey baster and it solved the problem.
    Jamie McLeod
    Hope Mills, NC

    1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
    1958 Commander "Christine"
    1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
    1955 Commander Sedan
    1964 Champ
    1960 Lark

    Comment


    • #3
      My 60 Lark is doing something similar to that also. I suspect the steering box, but would like some more opinions.
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

      Comment


      • #4
        The gears in the steering gear box are designed to mesh slightly tighter when the car is pointed straight ahead. There is an adjustment on the steering box that may need to be loosened. The procedure in the shop manual makes it sound complicated, but you can try loosening it 1/4 turn with a wrench and screwdriver and see if it helps. Could be a bad sector gear too, but try adjusting it first, doesn't cost anything.....

        Comment


        • #5
          When we drove my son's 58 to the mountains last year, the steering go so tight that it took two of us to get it working again. We figured that while we were driving in mostly a straight line without turning too much, what grease in the steering box would drain to the bottom of the box. Once we moved the steering wheel lock to lock a couple of times, the steering effort would ease up, until we drove in a straight line for a while, then it would get real tight. The next day, we went to a local Napa store and bought the CV joint grease. It is heavy enough to stay in the steering box and not leak all over the place and really improved the steering effort. We first noticed the problem about six months earlier on the first long trip in the car. After extended driving on the interstate, the steering would get sticky in one spot, close to center and it would take a slght pull on the wheel to get it loosened up.
          Jamie McLeod
          Hope Mills, NC

          1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
          1958 Commander "Christine"
          1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
          1955 Commander Sedan
          1964 Champ
          1960 Lark

          Comment


          • #6
            I wonder about heating up some STP, then using a turkey baster to fill the box with it. That stuff is slicker'n snot on a door knob

            Comment


            • #7
              Two things...be careful using grease in a steering box. It needs to be a "flow-able" lubricant. Grease will "pack-away" from the parts you want to lubricate and before you know it, the tapered gears that operate in the worm gear will flat spot and be ruined.

              One other possibility is to check the orientation of the adjusting bolts on your tie rods. I had a shop leave mine in a position that would allow them to rub my oil pan. It was inconsistent and puzzling to me and I didn't find it until after a couple of trips. While moving the wheels doing a grease job under the car...I discovered the problem. Those pinch bolts on the tie rod ends need to be turned away from rub points. Jack the car up and turn the wheels lock to lock. Be aware that the clearances will be different with the car jacked up, but if it is too close, it might just rub with the weight of the car on the ground.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                I wonder about heating up some STP, then using a turkey baster to fill the box with it. That stuff is slicker'n snot on a door knob
                i know it's common practice to add some type of grease to these boxes but I'm a firm believer in rebuilding these steering boxes. New bushings and a fresh seal at a minimum then topped off with the correct oil.

                Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
                53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
                57 SH (project)
                60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by starliner62 View Post
                  When we drove my son's 58 to the mountains last year, the steering go so tight that it took two of us to get it working again. We figured that while we were driving in mostly a straight line without turning too much, what grease in the steering box would drain to the bottom of the box. Once we moved the steering wheel lock to lock a couple of times, the steering effort would ease up, until we drove in a straight line for a while, then it would get real tight. The next day, we went to a local Napa store and bought the CV joint grease. It is heavy enough to stay in the steering box and not leak all over the place and really improved the steering effort. We first noticed the problem about six months earlier on the first long trip in the car. After extended driving on the interstate, the steering would get sticky in one spot, close to center and it would take a slght pull on the wheel to get it loosened up.
                  This sounds exactly like the problem I'm having!! Having never really gotten the car on a long stretch of highway, I have never noticed the problem. It also clears up when I move the steering from lock to lock... but only for a short while.

                  Can anyone recommend a "flowable" grease I can get at a local parts house?
                  Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    ask for a tube of CV joint grease. It might take two tubes they're small.
                    After the addittion of the grease if it doesn't help Mark the adjusting screw with paint and back it off just a small amount less thn 1/8 inch at a time.


                    Originally posted by mjeansonne View Post
                    This sounds exactly like the problem I'm having!! Having never really gotten the car on a long stretch of highway, I have never noticed the problem. It also clears up when I move the steering from lock to lock... but only for a short while.

                    Can anyone recommend a "flowable" grease I can get at a local parts house?

                    Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
                    53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
                    57 SH (project)
                    60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't forget the king pins and center pivot, either. Never hurts to give the entire front end a thorough grease job. Many shops will entirely miss the center pivot, because with few exceptions, brand X cars don't have one.
                      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Buy the correct steering box fluid from S.I. Studebaker International Product #801651

                        Robert Kapteyn

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gordr View Post
                          Don't forget the king pins and center pivot, either. Never hurts to give the entire front end a thorough grease job. Many shops will entirely miss the center pivot, because with few exceptions, brand X cars don't have one.
                          I grease the front end (all 20 or so zerts) every 5,000 miles, and hit the u'joints every 10,000. As for missing the center pivot zert, on our 63 GT, someone had welded a bracketed plate over it, in order to limit right steer. The steering limit was needed due to a fabricated driver side header pipe that would jam against the steering control valve when steered too far to the right. The problem was compounded due to the auto-transmission mounts installed backwards, which set the engine to the rear an extra 1/2-3/4", and the header pipe even closer to the control valve. Sort of a hip bone connected to the leg bone situation; in order to fix any of those SNAFUs, they all had to be fixed. I suppose who ever welded over the center pivot zerk was not aware it even existed. Anyway, I agree its important to grease Studes, but not every 1000 miles like the earlier Lube Orders stated.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I did get some "semi-fluid" grease and put it in the steering gear box(Ross Unit) on the Hawk. Had to use about a cup and a half!! Apparently, it was dry. But all works well now. Took it for a drive on the interstate for several miles and the stickyness was gone.

                            Couldn't find any of the suggested grease, so I went to the local John Deere dealer and talked to them in the parts department. Happened that one of the mechanics was there and joined in the crowd that had gathered when I told them I needed it for a Studebaker!! He suggested one of their products: "Multi-Luber", Part No. AN11100. He said if the seals and bearings were bad, this stuff wouldn't be as prone to leak. It looks like "STP", but maybe a little thicker and greasier with "clumps of grease" in it. Pours well into a plastic ketchup bottle dispenser or haircolor squeeze bottle you can get at Sallie's Beauty Supply.

                            So far, so good. Will report on whether it leaks out or not.
                            Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rkapteyn View Post
                              Buy the correct steering box fluid from S.I. Studebaker International Product #801651

                              Robert Kapteyn
                              I understand this is the correct fluid to use in the Ross steering box used on the Hawks,
                              but what is considered correct on the 1961-64 Larks?

                              Joe
                              sigpic

                              1962 Daytona
                              1964 Cruiser
                              And a few others

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X