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  • fitting the doors

    I did not know this before however it is alot to putting these hawks together. Welded the floor in and the area at the door bottom and now the the door is hitting at the floor. I don't know how this happened because there was a little bit of the floor still there, we welded the floor at the same height, it must be bowed. The doors were removed while we did it and sent out for glass,channel,wisker replacement.One of the doors had to be sent back because the window kept coming up at an angle and cracking it. I bought a nos window bracket and gave it to them I think this will fix it. It's the bracket that bolts to the inside of the door so the window can ride in it's channel has felt in it. has anyone ever had these problem?

    Studebakers forever!
    Studebakers forever!

  • #2
    too late now,but any time you do structural repair to a body shell,you have to have the doors on and aligned,and opening and closing easily. [And this is not just Studebakers]-.
    Align those doors with the front and rear fenders,and top of door opening. Then sit down and study what can be done to 'move' or adjust your floor and/or rocker panels.
    [make sure the car is on a LEVEL solid surface] [concrete floor] set on jackstands placed so that the weight of car is supported as it would be if it were on all 4 wheels.
    Hopefully you can save the job without a lot of rework!

    LaSalle,Il
    61Hawk
    Oglesby,Il.

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    • #3
      Don't get me started on this one! The 62 ragtop I recently sold, the previous owner welded the floors in with out fitting the doors, fenders or quarter panels. I guess he thought the channel for the weatherstrip was not needed, so to make his door gap, he filled the channel with "bondo" (no not Billy) <G>
      I ended up cutting the floors and using a comalong to pull it all back together. The doors probably fit better then what Studebaker ever built. <G>
      To solve your problem, you might "try" 2x4 and a BFH (big freaking hammer) and tap, (beat it) down for clearance. BUT, remember, you still have a sill and carpet that goes in between the door and sill.
      You "might" need to cut the floor loose and re weld in in while fitting the door, There should be abour 1/2" clearence between them.
      Weld a few inches at a time, and check the fit.

      Jim
      "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

      We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


      Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

      As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
      their Memorials!

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      • #4
        After looking at it again, It's the door bottoms that are not right the floor is as it should be, It's going to be interesting to see what he does[B)] he has 15 days to finish the job so I will wait and see.

        Studebakers forever!
        Studebakers forever!

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        • #5
          With the doors aleigned, tacking a "x" brace in the opening, with a bar across the top for good measure, ensures that the body does not move. Of course, it is tough getting into the car to work on it, but at least the body won't rack on you.

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          • #6
            A number of years ago when I had the body shop, a friend brought me a Camaro he was restoring at home. Bought new factory quarters, carefully stripped the old ones, and welded in the new ones- took him a couple months working nights and weekends. Cut in the doors, jambs, and fenders; then hung them.

            He was surprized to find out that the doors would not come close to closing! The inner edge of the door wouldn't fit into the body, even with the hinges slotted and all the way forward into the fenders... so here he comes dragging it in, telling me to fix it- and if I can't, run over it with the payloader!

            I solved it by grinding out the leading outer edge on the quarter, tapping the striker pillar back, then re-welding and shaping the edge.

            I learned long ago to keep a close eye on fit during welding, same as when straightening... of course, by redoing screw-ups[:I]

            Of course, in this area, the 60s and 70s cars offered PLENTY of practice in rusted panel replacement...[xx(]

            Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
            Parish, central NY 13131
            http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

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            • #7
              We usually fit everything in place, use either sheet metal screws, or "cleko" fasteners, and check all the gaps etc. It's really hard to "adjust" a welded panel after it's welded in!
              Before we send a vehicle to the paint shop, we fit everything, including headlamps and bumpers. Also makes so NO surprises at the end.

              Jim
              "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

              We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


              Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

              As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
              their Memorials!

              Comment

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