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  • #16
    Tom (sbca) -

    Justa thought...also noted by one or two others.
    By your airplane statement..it shows without a doubt, how much you only "think" you know!

    Mike

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    • #17
      Good one Mike! Put downs are what you excel at! I explained what I
      was refering too, and the assumption I made about airplane parts. The
      fact remains that the material I chose is perfectly fine, the FEA is
      posted, & why you feel the need to constantly make jabs is beyond me.

      I made my point, and I posted facts to back it up.

      Tom

      quote:Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten
      By your airplane statement..it shows without a doubt, how much you only "think" you know! Mike
      '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
      Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
      http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
      I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

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      • #18
        First off, you folks know more about different grades of metals than I ever will. I agree with Mike that what's important is the loads those materials have to work under. However, when it comes to brakes, motorcycles have used aluminum calipers, mounting brackets and stainless discs riveted to aluminum centers for ages. Sure, there's less weight to a motorcycle than a car, but throw in the top speed advantage the average motorcycle has for years had over the average car and the distance they can stop in, designed correctly, aluminum works. Considering how lawsuit happy the world is anymore, if it didn't work, they wouldn't use it.

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        • #19
          quote:Originally posted by John Kirchhoff

          First off, you folks know more about different grades of metals than I ever will. I agree with Mike that what's important is the loads those materials have to work under. However, when it comes to brakes, motorcycles have used aluminum calipers, mounting brackets and stainless discs riveted to aluminum centers for ages. Sure, there's less weight to a motorcycle than a car, but throw in the top speed advantage the average motorcycle has for years had over the average car and the distance they can stop in, designed correctly, aluminum works. Considering how lawsuit happy the world is anymore, if it didn't work, they wouldn't use it.
          True enough, but those superbikes with the aluminum caliper brackets are built by big corporations with lots of money for R&D work, not to mention a posse of lawyers to throw into the fray if one of those parts does break unexpectedly. Same could be said of the Corvette. For folks like ourselves, doing "one-off" modifications like this, I personally believe we are better off using tried and true materials for crucial structural and braking parts.

          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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          • #20
            quote:
            The Aloha 737 became a convertible because of the procedure used to treat the metal prior to assembly. All the aircraft built during this time frame had to go under extensive sheetmetal repair. The crown on the fuselage top were removed and the metal was inspected and corrosion treated the reinstalled. Very manhour extensive. So it not the aluminum thats the problem its the corrosion that weakened the aluminum.
            I'll give you that. I am also well aware of the 737 as my father saw the plane from the tarmac as he flew in for an alternative energy project they were working on, which is why I brought it up. Most to all materials are subject to nature, if it wasnt, I wouldnt have rust from the salt in the Commander. But the plane also was used as a local flight for islanders to hop from island to island. The planes would ascend to a certain ceiling and then descend from the ceiling. At the same time the plane would pressurize and then depressurize. This was not the average transcontinental flight were the metal was at a particular ceiling for a long time. This was more of a quick deflate-inflate-deflate, which was done quite regularly. Well, at some point the metal has gotta give, and of course the marine air doesn't help this situation at all. We gotta remember metal can become brittle if forces and heat or stress are applied enough. I've done it plenty when breaking thin brass and steel sheetmetal by folding it back an forth. Add in a plane with a very long service record with minimal upkeep with something to accelerate the corrosion from the marine air, and you have a potential problem in the midst.

            I don't doubt Tom's project on the brakes. More than anything, it was some unique circumstances that added a "convertable top" to the 737. But, considering my background with science, there is always an exception(s), and usually there aren't any or many absolutes. Like I said, aluminum is a great material, thats why heatsinks are made from it. Considering what that FEA showed from way back, I'll take his word for it, it works . Also, I assume its going on the average road vehicle, not a vehicle meant for the brutal punishment of a circle track, so hopefully I'm not excepting a brief functionality, followed by a catastrophic brake disaster.



            1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
            1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
            [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
            [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
            [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
            [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]
            1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
            1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
            1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
            1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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