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Brake drum turning

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  • Brakes: Brake drum turning

    Last month I was doing the brakes on my 41 Champion when the rear drum had a couple of ridges in it. i took it to a machine shop where the guy told me that he could put it on a lade and get them out. I waited for it and as it took a long time to do I got worried. He took it off and it was cleaned up so I put it on my car. A couple of weeks later I finally drove the car and after a while the brake pedtal started to pulsate when I came to a stop. I guess this means the drum is out of round. I talked to him about it and he thinks if I can find someone that can turn the drum on a conventional brake machine it will correct the problem, I think I need another brake drum. I don't know how many times it has been turned so I don't know what does the forum think?
    Studebakers forever!

  • #2
    Take it to an automotive machine shop and have them measure it. They should be good for about .120" oversize. If there is room to machine it within those tolerances you should be fine. We don't drive these car with recklesness at high speeds.
    Nick

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    • #3
      What did the other guy use to turn the drum? Did he use something that was not conventional?

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      • #4
        Did you just do one? Maybe one of the others is warped.
        Oglesby,Il.

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        • #5
          Yes a brake drum can be turned on an engine lathe but, it is generally not practical. A brake lathe is much faster and is designed to hold the drum properly. If not held correctly an egg shape can be introduced in the drum because of the jaws on the lathe chuck. I do have the tools to hold the drum from the center on my engine lathe but, I rarely do it because of the extra steps it takes. Neal

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          • #6
            Max cut by law (DOT) is .060" over stock.
            So if you have 10" drums, the max it can be cut is 10.060" diameter.
            New linings will be needed, and possibly oversized linings to keep full brake shoe contact with the drum.
            Basic drum brake tech 101 stuff.

            Most O'Reilly's auto parts, or older auto parts stores can help you out.
            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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            • #7
              Glad you had that stat, I found a machine shop in my area that has a brake machine. he said that he has done old cars like mine and has the right adapter for my rear drum. I will go in with your info 10.060 I am using new linings as I have only driven the car once. If It does not work I have a drum "nos" coming and will have him press that hub into the new drum, I am so glad I found this guy as the only alernative I had was to take it to White Post rstoration. Thanks for all the info
              Studebakers forever!

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              • #8
                Yes, only one so I know it's that drum
                Studebakers forever!

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                • #9
                  The guy used a engine lathe
                  Originally posted by bosshoss61 View Post
                  What did the other guy use to turn the drum? Did he use something that was not conventional?
                  Studebakers forever!

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                  • #10
                    I found a machine shop less than 5 miles from the house that can turn old drums. They turned the drum and it is very true. It is still with in the tolerances of the metal so I am back on the road. The wheel spins and I have the brakes adjusted. Thanks all.
                    Studebakers forever!

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                    • #11
                      My philosophy about brake drums, based upon over 50 years of maintaining the brakes on my own cars, is to avoid turning drums unless they are out of round or deeply grooved. If they have a few shallow grooves, I don't worry about it as long as they are not worn over spec and the brake shoes are arced for proper contact. Some scuffing with 80 grit paper will remove any glaze on the drum surface. If the drums are out of round or deeply scored, it is time to replace them.

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                      • #12
                        Did they happen to mention if the runout the drum had before they turned it?

                        The success of wheel balancing, brake disc and drum machining, flywheel re-facing and valve and seat grinding all depend heavily on centering, and centering depends on quality and condition of fixtures and arbors, and the operator's understanding and interest in preventing errors. In my experience not checking my work is just inviting mistakes. And even "good" shops' work needs to be double checked every time to avoid expensive and frustrating problems, and excuses and blank stares from behind the shop counter.

                        The common cone centering adapter can be badly fooled by badly machined or damaged chamfers on the part's center hole. An operator who loads the part and walks away will have no indication if the material is being removed uniformly (normal) or heavily from one side ( possibly normal, but more often an indication the part is mounted improperly).
                        "That will be 15$, cash, no personal (or craftsmanship) checks "

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