Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Engine miss diagnosis

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by sactorandy View Post
    UPDATE: I've eliminated the problem as being fuel related. I am convinced that it is an electrical glinch so replaced the coil and condenser as someone suggested. While replacing the coil I discovered the ground wire, black wire from the + side of the coil to the distributor, to be frayed so I replaced it. Then while changing the condenser I discovered the 2" ground wire inside the distributor had been wrapped in electrical tape and fell apart when I touched it. I'm thinking that was the problem from the start. This wire goes from the condenser/points ground to a bolt that goes through the distributor housing and is connected to the ground wire to the coil. I replaced it and now don't get any spark when I try to start the car. What now? Is the pole/bolt that goes to through the distributor housing isolated from the housing? It doesn't look like it but does go through what looks like a little fabric pad that I can't explain. Thanks for the help everyone.
    If it isn't, it jolly well better be if the engine is to ever have a prayer of starting.

    (Yes, seriously; it must be isolated "through" the distributor housing. It very much sounds like you correctly identified the problem..) BP

    Leave a comment:


  • tbredehoft
    replied
    Verify that the wire from the distributor to the coil is hooked to the + terminal. That's assuming you still have 6 volt positive ground. if its been converted to 12 volt, it probably is Negative ground and it should be - terminal to distributor.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by sactorandy View Post
    UPDATE: I've eliminated the problem as being fuel related. I am convinced that it is an electrical glinch so replaced the coil and condenser as someone suggested. While replacing the coil I discovered the ground wire, black wire from the + side of the coil to the distributor, to be frayed so I replaced it. Then while changing the condenser I discovered the 2" ground wire inside the distributor had been wrapped in electrical tape and fell apart when I touched it. I'm thinking that was the problem from the start. This wire goes from the condenser/points ground to a bolt that goes through the distributor housing and is connected to the ground wire to the coil. I replaced it and now don't get any spark when I try to start the car. What now? Is the pole/bolt that goes to through the distributor housing isolated from the housing? It doesn't look like it but does go through what looks like a little fabric pad that I can't explain. Thanks for the help everyone.
    I hate to say it, but it sounds like the motor is shot. You are gonna need to drop a SBC in it.

    Leave a comment:


  • rstrasser
    replied
    Since your car is 6 volts positive ground the wire that goes from the + terminal on the coil to the distributor and then to the fixed contact on the points can not come in contact to the distributor housing. The bolt through the side of the distributor housing must be insulated from the distributor.
    The wire that you found that goes from the plate that the points and condenser is mounted on to the distributor housing is there to ensure a good path for the electricity to travel from the + terminal on the coil through the points and back to the battery via the engine and the frame of the car. If that wire is defective it could have caused the problem you were having.

    Ron

    Leave a comment:


  • sactorandy
    replied
    UPDATE: I've eliminated the problem as being fuel related. I am convinced that it is an electrical glinch so replaced the coil and condenser as someone suggested. While replacing the coil I discovered the ground wire, black wire from the + side of the coil to the distributor, to be frayed so I replaced it. Then while changing the condenser I discovered the 2" ground wire inside the distributor had been wrapped in electrical tape and fell apart when I touched it. I'm thinking that was the problem from the start. This wire goes from the condenser/points ground to a bolt that goes through the distributor housing and is connected to the ground wire to the coil. I replaced it and now don't get any spark when I try to start the car. What now? Is the pole/bolt that goes to through the distributor housing isolated from the housing? It doesn't look like it but does go through what looks like a little fabric pad that I can't explain. Thanks for the help everyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwain G.
    replied
    You must be looking at a later wiring diagram. Unless your car has been changed to 12 Volt system, it does not use a resistor in the ignition wiring.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by sactorandy View Post
    This sounds like something I should do. Is the resistance wire for the ignition the wire from the distributor to the coil? Do I just run a new wire from the distributor to a resistor and from the resistor to the coil? What gauge wire and what ceramic resistor? Are ceramic resistors all the same?

    NO! That wire is the Ground wire to the points. Follow Steven A's advice, except: Resistance wires are PINK.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steven Ayres
    replied
    Originally posted by sactorandy View Post
    This sounds like something I should do. Is the resistance wire for the ignition the wire from the distributor to the coil? Do I just run a new wire from the distributor to a resistor and from the resistor to the coil? What gauge wire and what ceramic resistor? Are ceramic resistors all the same?
    It's been too long for me to remember specs, but the tipoff was in the wiring diagram, showing a resistance symbol on what appeared to be a plain black wire. The resistor goes between the positive side of the coil and the ignition switch, and you'll see it standard on eights. I compared it with a later-model diagram for the same engine and bought a resistor to suit that spec, but I rather doubt they vary much.

    Steven Ayres, Prescott AZ
    58H-K7 660

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    I have not had any "bad" coils or condensors yet.
    I would not really expect them to cause an engine to "run and quit running over and over in rapid succession." I would expect that once the parts are warm the poor running would not clear, and then run OK for a mile or 2.
    If statistics, even compiled by Tom McCahill, indicate that electrical ignition components are "the problem" 90% of the time, the corollary is 10% of the time "the problem" is something else, maybe fuel related.

    I have to think repairs based on probability over diagnostics "probably" is going to fail badly sometimes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    A condensor is cheap and easy to replace..!

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • sactorandy
    replied
    This sounds like something I should do. Is the resistance wire for the ignition the wire from the distributor to the coil? Do I just run a new wire from the distributor to a resistor and from the resistor to the coil? What gauge wire and what ceramic resistor? Are ceramic resistors all the same?

    Leave a comment:


  • Steven Ayres
    replied
    I agree with the 90%-electrical rule. I had a similar problem with my '59 Silver Hawk with the 170. I got a great deal on the car because despite a complete and very pretty restoration the previous owner couldn't get it to run right. None of the standard tune-up procedures had any effect. Eventually I figured out that the resistance wire for the ignition system had lost its resistance. I replaced it with a ceramic resistor and she ran like a top.

    Steven Ayres, Prescott AZ
    58H-K7 660

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    I try to aim before firing the shotgun.
    Pretty early on I'd check for blue spark when cranking with new plug with widened gap.
    Among the first things I'd do is disconnect fuel line near the carb, ground the coil wire, and crank the engine to squirt an inch or 2 of gas into a clean glass jar or pyrex measuring cup.
    The purpose is to visually inspect the gasoline being fed to the carb. It should be crystal clear, and clean. A blob rolling around the bottom of the jar is even more serious. Even if I think it's OK I usually splash in some isopropyl drygas. If after the swirling stops it is noticeably clearer there was some water dispersed in the gas. I'll add 1 or 2 bottles of drygas to gasahol even though it is raising the alcohol content

    A cup of Massachusetts 10% ethanol will become murky if left out on a humid day. I believe that it is pulling the moisture right out of the air. The surface to volume ratio is lower/better when the gas is in the tank, but the process of water absorption is still going on.

    Leave a comment:


  • mapman
    replied
    The easiest place to start looking is to pull the plugs and check them. Replacing the points and condenser is easy too and relatively cheap. Also check the coil as suggested.
    Sometimes a little piece of junk will start roving around in the carb bowl and intermitently plug jets. One way to test this is: if you are driving and it starts to miss can you pump the gas to get it to run better momentarily? If yes, open and clean the carb out. Sometimes you can clear it up by removing the mixture screw and blowing compressed air into the carb hole to dislodge the culprit. If this works the particle is still in the carb and must be removed or it will happen again. I also think replacing the filters is also a first priority. It would be nice to find the problem by eliminating symptoms before tearing everything out and replacing stuff.
    rob

    Leave a comment:


  • r1lark
    replied
    Originally posted by 63t-cab View Post
    If you're gonna drain the tank " I'd go as far as dropping it and cleaning it out completely" BTDT.
    I agree with Joe. After getting stuck with my '54 4-door soon after getting it, I found that there was 'trash' (actually red RTV that some past owner or so-called mechanic had glopped under the fuel level sender) floating around in the tank. It would get sucked up against the pickup, and the car would start running terrible and then quit. After a while it would start again, and repeat the cycle all over again. The gas tank from my Snapper riding mower tied under the hood with bungie cords got me home. Used a couple of coffe cans full of nuts and bolts inside the tank and a couple of gallons of MEK (only do this outside, kids!) and a couple of hours of sloshing around and the tank came out really clean. No problems since.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X