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  • Engine: Schooler Camshaft

    I just picked up a "Schooler" camshaft and would like to know if someone could tell me how to check it's profile, overlap, lift, duration etc... It was ground as a cam to in the realm of a R2+ but with Schooler they had certain tricks that made them the cam of choice for stock cars around the Florida area in the 60's and early 70's, like more exhaust lift than intake to help evacuate the cylinder faster. It was intended for racing but is supposed to be streetable. Many Studebakers back then that ran this cam were competitive and won races. Any help would be appreciated. A link to an article would be fine. Just need to know how to tell exactly what I have as the guy I bought it from used this profile when he was racing back in the day. Len.

  • #2
    Google 'Schooler Camshaft' and some stuff shows up.

    Read inside this link. Some history, with names and numbers show up.

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...d.php?t=426240
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      Len -

      Just go to most any of the current cam manufacturers catalogs. Normally in the back of the cat., they give instructions on degreeing a cam.
      This "degreeing" information is much the information I think you are looking for. You'll find the lift(s), the duration(s), the open closing point(s). Then you'll have to do a little math to figure out the duration.

      You'll need a "cam degreeing" set of tools. This includes a large degree wheel (larger the better), a mag based dial indicator or a special tool that Looks sort of like a giant lifter that a dial indicator slips into, and a piston stop to obtain the actual, "exact" top dead center.

      You'll probably also need an adapter to locate the degree wheel to the crank...so you can turn the crankshaft both directions...without disturbing the degree wheels location on the crank.

      Mike

      P.S. -
      Also, don't expect too much out of the exhaust flow trick these days. Beside being (I hate the term..) "old school" technology, it's not done much today. It has been retried a few years back by the turbo guys, but I think most have gone back to more normal lifts and duration. After all...power is made by the burning of the air.
      Plus, the exhaust ports in the Stude heads flow pretty well. When I port Stude heads, I don't have to do much reshaping to get them to flow better thAn the intake..."percentage" wise.
      Last edited by Mike Van Veghten; 11-03-2012, 09:14 AM.

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      • #4
        FWIW, in SoCal there are several shops with computer cam reading machines. Cam Doctor was one of the earliest, but there are several better now. Try taking your cam into Iskenderian and asking Timmy to give you a readout on it and ask how it compares to the Isky E4 (same as R1-R2) and their ST5 (same as Harbit/Fairborn R2+).

        It will be an interesting project, so be sure to let us know what specs you find. As Mike says, there isn't any magic in the fifty year old cam grinds. If we had a core with enough meat on the lobes, the current CompCams Xtreme Energy grinds would run rings around the old stuff. That is if modern valve springs and pushrods were also used.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Skybolt View Post
          I just picked up a "Schooler" camshaft and would like to know if someone could tell me how to check it's profile, overlap, lift, duration etc... It was ground as a cam to in the realm of a R2+ but with Schooler they had certain tricks that made them the cam of choice for stock cars around the Florida area in the 60's and early 70's, like more exhaust lift than intake to help evacuate the cylinder faster. It was intended for racing but is supposed to be streetable. Many Studebakers back then that ran this cam were competitive and won races. Any help would be appreciated. A link to an article would be fine. Just need to know how to tell exactly what I have as the guy I bought it from used this profile when he was racing back in the day. Len.
          If you want to send it to me, I can check it for you. When I was in the parts business, I set up a dummy block to modify small block Mopar fuel pumps for the R 1, 2, 3 and 4 engines and also to check camshafts.

          I can give you the intake & exhaust opening and closing points, the lobe lift on each, the duration at .050" lifter clearance, intake lobe center, lobe separation, etc. Cannot tell you what the lash should be but you should have a tech card from the grinder to tell you that but most likely you don't have one. Best suggestion is to set them at .020" to start with and go from there. Seems a lot of reground cams are set at .020".

          Ted

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          • #6
            Deepnhock, I did that before I posted here and was looking for any more info. I found a couple of mentions on a few sites and some images of decals on early stock cars but nothing that great. I did see a catalog but could get to see inside it.

            Mike, I will check out some of the cam info site and see what I can come up with. I do have a few dial indicators, some more sensitive and accurate than others but don't have a degree wheel. So I'll see what happens.

            Jack, I don't know about taking it to Iskenderian as there was some animosity between Schooler and Iskenderian. I might try some other place.

            I will let you all know what it is when it is known.
            This is the page that mentions Schoolers dislike for Ed Iskandarian, he said
            it is a fact that Ed Iskiderian (Isky Cams) did copy a Schooler cam in the production of the 5 Cycle cam.

            This is what I have found:
            Just do a "ctrl F" and type in Schooler when on any one of the following pages.

            This one talks about his combining a European and US style cam grind.

            http://www.locostusa.com/forums/view...t=157&start=30

            Most of the way down the page it mentions a Schooler cam in a Studebaker.
            The middle link has many details of what he did.

            http://www.midstateantiquestockcarcl...book_2011.html
            http://midstateantiquestockcarclub.com/flat_heads4.html
            http://midstateantiquestockcarclub.com/flat_heads9.html

            http://midstateantiquestockcarclub.c...p_wg_emmr.html


            One of these is what Deepnhock mentioned:
            The second one mentions Schoolers dislike for Ed Iskandarian, he said it is a fact that Ed Iskiderian (Isky Cams) did copy a Schooler cam in the production of the 5 Cycle cam.

            www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/Fshowthread.php?t=333273

            http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...d.php?t=426240


            This is the catalog:

            http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedi...arts-159086459

            A mention:

            http://www.harveycrane.com/founders.htm
            http://jaxhalloffame.forumotion.com/...n-w-nichols-sr
            http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/...s/message/6302

            Len.
            Last edited by ; 11-03-2012, 04:52 PM.

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            • #7
              Once I just set a cam on my desk and zeroed out the indicator on some assessable portion of the base circle. Then I rotated the cam to get the lift (plus the rocker ratio). It was quite accurate. A degree wheel can be fashioned from many things. I once borrowed one from my neighbor and Zeroxed it. Other times I have used protractors. While not 100% accurate it helps when curious (and cheap).

              Tom
              '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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